Lions Perspective - Student Support /tags/student-support en How To Thrive in an Online Class /focus-learning/volume-3-issue-1/how-thrive-online-class <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Shea Huffman</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/focus-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Focus on Learning</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/focus-learning/217-areyoureadyforelearning.png?itok=stypmqCF"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/focus-learning/217-areyoureadyforelearning.png?itok=stypmqCF" width="480" height="374" alt="R U ready for eLearning?" title="before signing up for an online class, make sure you are ready" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>Almost everyone enrolled in college is going to have to take at least one online class in their lifetime. While it may seem like cakewalk work, in reality it is far from it. The workload can verge on extensive, due-dates loom overhead like a rain cloud, and the face-to-face aspect of most classes is dashed. <br /> If you are considering an online class, you may be wondering how you’re ever going to have the ability to juggle so many responsibilities. A good place to start is Estrella Mountain Community College’s own eLearning webpage<a href="http://www.estrellamountain.edu/academics/classes/orientation" rel="nofollow">— take the eLearning Orientation</a> and determine if eLearning is right for you.</p> <p>If you’ve taken the plunge and are ready for an online class, this guide is for you.</p> <p><strong>1. Have a Reliable Computer</strong><br /> A specific rule-of-thumb for online classes is to always make sure you have a reliable computer at home, booted with the capability of reliable internet access. You never want to be faced with a situation where your computer isn’t working or you don’t have internet access. Remember, in an online class or even hybrid, the main means of communication with your teacher and getting homework turned in on time is through the computer, so a reliable computer with trustworthy internet is key. However, say your computer stops working—crashes all of a sudden at 11p.m. when you’re trying to submit that midterm essay and you nearly have a heart-attack, right? You may be wondering what to do if this unfortunate turn of events decides to roll your way. Well, step two has you covered.</p> <p><strong>2.  The Back-Up Plan(s)</strong><br /> It’s always important to keep a back-up plan under your sleeve in case of emergencies. Just like fire hydrants are used for emergencies, you can use your back-up plan(s) to help act as a safeguard when you need it. If your computer decides that the day to shut down is in the middle of an important assignment that you were trying to turn in, one that will possibly cost you half of your grade, use that lifeline to get your help. A back-up plan for online classes should be something along the lines of using a computer down at the library, knowing a friend that could let you borrow their computer or, in the event Canvas is malfunctions, being ready to submit the assignment in a different way, say by emailing it to your instructor. A flash drive is a must-have to backup all data, just in case your files get deleted from your computer.  With back-up plans, you will always have something to fall back on.</p> <p><strong>3. Be Technologically Savvy</strong><br /> Speaking of falling back on things, it will always be beneficial to you in an online class to be technologically savvy. Nowadays, it is pertinent that one be able to easily operate and navigate a computer, and for online classes, to be proficient operating the class’s eBook or other required materials. In addition, one must be able to surf the web and use whatever Learning Management System the school has for their classes; in EMCC’s case, Canvas. If you do not know how to use Canvas or are a little rusty on the subject, you can always go to the Computer Commons in Estrella Hall on campus to receive help with it.</p> <p><strong>4.  Remember, the Teacher is Your Friend</strong><br /> Your teacher is someone you can fall back on. If you ever need help or assistance, they are always there to mentor and guide. Alternatively, remember you can always use the <a href="http://www.estrellamountain.edu/students/tutoring" rel="nofollow">Tutoring service</a> (free, available at Estrella Hall South). Check and see if there are specific tutoring hours for your discipline. It’s always advisable to schedule an appointment.<br /> If you are having technical problems, don’t forget to try <a href="http://www.estrellamountain.edu/students/computer-commons" rel="nofollow">Computer Commons</a> or customer service first, because the teachers are not the ones who run Canvas, nor can they always help you troubleshoot. However, any help you need pertaining to an assignment or question about the class would be something in their wheel-house, and they will gladly assist.</p> <p>So now that you know all the steps toward passing an online class, you can now confidently sign up for that class you need. Just remember--you should always try to stay ahead of the game and keep up on your work, and never let yourself fall behind, or else you may get left in the dust. Keep a reliable internet, be technologically prepared, and never be afraid to ask for help.</p> <p>With drive and determination (and tips like these) you will not fail!</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/elearning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">eLearning</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-support" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Support</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-challenges" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Challenges</a></div></div></div> Thu, 12 Feb 2015 21:04:10 +0000 MARDH70971 217 at EMCC’s Computer Commons /focus-learning/volume-3-issue-1/emccs-computer-commons <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"> By Karla Villarreal</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/focus-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Focus on Learning</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/focus-learning/200-computer.jpg?itok=tWQJ9698"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/focus-learning/200-computer.jpg?itok=tWQJ9698" width="480" height="341" alt="student working on computer" title="Student working in Computer Commons, photo: J. Henriquez " /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>College can be very overwhelming, especially when you have a busy schedule. Sometimes finding a quiet place to study or getting individual help can be very difficult. Many students in college experience stress, but Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC) has several resources designed to aid in student success.</p> <p>EMCC’s Computer Commons, remodeled in the spring of 2013, is one of these resources. This department includes computers, work areas, vending machines, and a scenic view of the campus through glass windows.<br /> Leeoni Long is a 19-year-old college student. She just finished her first year at EMCC and has always loved the assistance at the Commons. She also likes the calm environment. When she is in a hurry she feels it is a great spot to be.</p> <p>“The EMCC support staff is always helpful and makes you feel welcomed by offering one-on-one assistance. One thing that I enjoy here is that there are study rooms which we can reserve twice a week for two hours and actually spend time doing homework. Not to mention, the computers are always updated with the latest software,” said Long.</p> <p>Long feels that the Computer Commons is very helpful to people who cannot afford computers or cannot get fast access to the Internet. She also believes the fact that the Computer Commons staff offers help with computer courses makes it even better.</p> <p>Jerry Happ and Daniel Morales, are both computer lab technicians at the Computer Commons and have assisted students here for many years. Happ feels the Commons is a very useful resource. He said, “It is better than a public library because of the free help offered with class assignments.”</p> <p>“About 25 percent of the people who come to the Commons stay over an hour logged on to the computers working on school work. There are a total of 800 unique loggings each day. Not including the study rooms computers, there are 120 computers,” said Happ.</p> <p>Morales expressed that “Students are not numbers, they’re individuals. Real help is offered to students and they don’t just occupy a chair. A really cool thing that we offer is 11 study rooms with a two-hour time limit twice a week. You can fit up to about 7 people in the rooms and work on school-related assignments as a team,” said Morales.</p> <p>For more information, please go to http://<a href="http://www.estrellamountain.edu/students/computer-common" rel="nofollow">www.estrellamountain.edu/students/computer-common</a>s.<br />  </p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/emcc-campus" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">EMCC Campus</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/employees" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Employees</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-support" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Support</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/technology" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Technology</a></div></div></div> Tue, 04 Nov 2014 22:44:18 +0000 MARDH70971 200 at What Makes a Good Math Teacher? /focus-learning/volume-3-issue-1/what-makes-good-math-teacher <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Kayt Ludi</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/focus-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Focus on Learning</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/focus-learning/199-mathteacher.jpg?itok=7FKWAfPT"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/focus-learning/199-mathteacher.jpg?itok=7FKWAfPT" width="480" height="320" alt="Math Book" title="Math classes represent a challenge for many students at EMCC." /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>Math can be hard. Students will complain about it. People long out of school will sometimes seem to have a shiver run up their spines thinking back to their last brush with it. So, how does a person teach it well?</p> <p>Above all, math is cumulative. If you cannot remember the basics, it is very hard to move on to the complex. And according to About.com, if students eked out a C in their last class, they are really moving on to the next class having only “absorbed and understood about half of what they should.”</p> <p>Rebecca Baranowski, the division chair for Math, Physics and Engineering at Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC) said, “I do know, from experience, that students who got a C don't typically do well in the next math class.  For example, students who got Cs in MAT151/182 tend to not pass Calculus I. It is a high percentage (above 50 percent), based on my experience.”</p> <p>How can math instructors help students absorb more? Baranowski said effective math teachers who have the ability to adapt to the students in their course, are continually assessing themselves to see what is working, and are continually assessing the students, though not just through formal exams. She added that they have a good working “knowledge of [the] material and how it is used,” as well as an “ability to explain concepts in a way that students can understand.”</p> <p>In addition Baranowski listed a few characteristics as important: being strict yet fair, having good classroom management skills, and having fun and enjoy[ing] the teaching.</p> <p>According to Valeria Flores, a Journalism major in her sophomore year at EMCC, “If the teacher teaches straight out of the book or uses the slides that are provided to them, then it becomes a little challenging.”</p> <p>Baranowski explained that, “Some students need instructors to do a lot of hands-on activities to help them truly understand the why behind the math. Some students need to work with other students in class. Others need a lecturer type instructor and students who have a fear of math need a nurturing type of instructor who is also their personal coach.”</p> <p>Baranowski continued to say that students should ask themselves, “Does the instructor teach to all the different learning styles? Is the instructor patient with students? Does the instructor push the students within reason? Does the instructor expect too much or too little of the students?” Baranowski points out that these things could have a huge impact on the success of a student in class. </p> <p>Flores described a good math teacher as, “Someone who actually takes the time out of his/her day to answer the student’s questions and who doesn't limit his/her time.” While she said a bad instructor gets frustrated over being asked questions.</p> <p>So, what can you do if you have a math teacher you either love or hate? Baranowski listed some options. First of all there is always “word of mouth— tell other students.” Secondly, she suggested reporting it on the evaluations that faculty give out. Furthermore, “let the division chair know, especially if it is good. Most information given to the division chair is about bad experiences, so having good feedback is great.” And finally, Baranowski suggested reporting it on <a href="http://ratemyprofessor.com" rel="nofollow">ratemyprofessor.com</a></p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/students" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Students</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-challenges" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Challenges</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/learning-styles" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Learning Styles</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-support" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Support</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/math" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Math</a></div></div></div> Tue, 04 Nov 2014 22:41:44 +0000 MARDH70971 199 at Options for Women Writers /issues-higher-education/volume-3-issue-1/options-women-writers <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Kayt Ludi</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/higher-education" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Issues in Higher Education</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/issues-higher-education/193-writer.jpg?itok=nhioE6qv"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/issues-higher-education/193-writer.jpg?itok=nhioE6qv" width="480" height="324" alt="freelance writer" title="Women Freelance Writers, photo: S. Jones" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>We all write on a daily basis. Whether it is an email, a Tweet, a paper for school, or an article for a magazine, we all write, maybe now more than ever. So, how does one move from being a person who writes to being a writer?</p> <p> Writers come in a myriad of variations. There are freelance writers, novelists, journalists, screenwriters, playwrights, technical writers, poets, and more. Being an English major, I know I want to find a way to make a living by writing, but what are my best options? Will being a woman have an effect on those options? And what really are my chances of making my dream a reality?</p> <p> Melody Warnick is a freelance writer who has been published in O: The Oprah Magazine, Redbook, Reader’s Digest, and Woman’s Day, just to name some publications. </p> <p> In a personal interview, Warnick explained, “I'd always imagined myself as a writer and did all the normal writerly things, like spending four years on the high school newspaper, majoring in English at college, and reading a ton. But it wasn't until after my first baby was born that I started looking at magazines and realizing that, hey, those were freelancers doing most of the stories, not people on staff.”</p> <p> Valeria Flores, a sophomore at Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC) plans to become a journalist. She described journalism as “such a competitive field.”  As Flores explained it, “You have to know a lot of different things in order to be a good journalist.”</p> <p> Working.com backs up this statement by saying, “Both print and broadcast reporters need detailed knowledge of the geography, history, economy, politics, media law and social life of the communities and countries in which they work. For writing critical reviews and analyses, they also need specialized knowledge in a particular area such as art or politics.”<br /> So how does a person get a foot in the door?</p> <p> Warnick got her start by sending an idea to a small local magazine. They paid her $0.10 a word. “I got paid a whopping $200!” Warnick said.</p> <p> However, it was a start she could build on; pitching ideas to successively bigger and better publications. According to Warnick, “It took me less than a year until I'd gotten my first assignment for a national magazine.” Now Warnick makes between $45,000 and $50,000 per year (pre-taxes). “But I'm definitely part-time,” she added.</p> <p> Flores did an internship at EMCC’s student magazine, The Lion’s Perspective, to get some more experience. She said she occasionally does research about job availability in journalism. She added, “Honestly, I am concerned,” referring to future job prospects in her chosen field. According to a Forbes article published in April of 2012, “Journalist came in fifth on the worst jobs list”, but the same article also cited a Georgetown University study which said “The unemployment rate for recent [journalism] college grads was 7.7 percent, a half a point below the national rate of 8.2 percent.”</p> <p> Has being a woman affected Warnick’s career? “In good and bad ways,” she said. “On the upside, I've written a lot for parenting and women's magazines over the years; being the target demographic and a regular reader of those magazines helped me pitch stories they wanted to publish. However, the downside, Warnick continued, “is that I sometimes lack confidence to pitch publications that I see as more male-centric, like, say, GQ or Outside. There ends up being a bit of a women's magazine ghetto where female writers get stuck.”</p> <p> Flores said she thinks being a woman will probably affect her career somehow, but she said she thinks being Hispanic is something that will have an even bigger impact. “Because I'm bilingual, it's going to help a lot.” stated Flores. “Instead of paying two people to do one job, they can have just one person.”</p> <p> Warnick would advise college students who want to become writers to “Think broadly. I've stuck largely with very traditional magazine writing, and that's probably to my detriment. The most successful freelance writers I know have learned to find work in all kinds of places: writing web content for a local business, writing catalog copy, writing white papers or brochures, writing educational content, writing marketing or ad copy, writing blog posts or books or speeches.”<br /> Warnick continued, “One of the hardest parts about starting out is that everyone wants to see samples of your work, but you’re just starting out and you don't have those samples. It's frustrating.</p> <p> If I were a current college student, I'd get an internship at a newspaper or magazine or work on the college paper—anything that lets me write and rack up a few published samples of my writing. The other alternative: start a blog. I think editors are more willing than ever to look at blog posts as samples of how you write.”</p> <p> Whichever sort of writer I end up becoming, the key, it seems, is to let my writing become its own foot in the door. Whether it is through a job, an internship, a blog, or even papers I’ve written for a class, all of them can be considered samples. The consensus seems to be to create and select your best samples, and then use them to demonstrate what you can do. So that is what I plan to do.<br />  </p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-engagement" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Engagement</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-support" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Support</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/carreers" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Carreers</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/emcc-classes" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">EMCC Classes</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/emcc-programs" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">EMCC Programs</a></div></div></div> Tue, 04 Nov 2014 22:17:02 +0000 MARDH70971 193 at Student Success Fair at EMCC /campus-life/volume-3-issue-1/student-success-fair-emcc <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Ernesto Oliva </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/campus-life" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Campus Life</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/campus-life/186-studentsuccessfair.jpg?itok=2mL0qzI5"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/campus-life/186-studentsuccessfair.jpg?itok=2mL0qzI5" width="480" height="320" alt="Student Success Fair" title="EMCC&#039;s Student Success Fair" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>“It is the perfect weather to be out here today! So many great opportunities and a positive vibe,” said student Analise Soto at the Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC) Student Success Fair held this past March.</p> <p>The purpose of the fair, according to Christina Izaguirre, one of the organizers, is “to celebrate students’ success and help them achieve their personal and academic goals.” “Overall, I am excited to see the constant flow of interaction between students, faculty and staff here at the Student Success Fair,” said Izaguirre. Students received a tri-fold graduation passport that encouraged them to learn about their campus and resources while knowing how to prepare for their individual graduation date.</p> <p>The passport cover contained room for a date, which the students filled out after they visited the zones and determined their graduation date. The passport also contained a map of the campus and key zones the students needed to visit for their passport stamps. There were four zones, which consisted of the green enroll zone, blue discover zone, red learn zone, and purple lead zone. The passport was completed with a black stamp when students took a picture with Rory, the school’s mascot.  </p> <p>Once students completed their graduation passport they received a free EMCC T-shirt that could be personalized with their graduation date. In addition, the fair gave students the opportunity to learn more about the different clubs and organizations at EMCC. “The students who opened up to me about their goals in life were really amazing. It felt like I was making a difference in their lives,” said Ursula Jackson from the Culinary Club.   </p> <p>Jackson shared the story on how she found her calling in culinary arts and wanted to do the same for others. By sharing her story with students, she felt it would inspire them to seek opportunities for themselves. Another highlight for many students was all of the food being handed out. “I think it is really neat that EMCC is offering all of this free food. I mean, who doesn’t love free food?” said student Sam Roybal. Roybal explained that she previously attended Glendale Community College and was surprised at how EMCC showed so much care for their students.  “I feel proud and privileged to attend EMCC because the school puts on so many events to help me with my educational goals”.</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-achievement" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Achievement</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-support" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Support</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/campus-event" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Campus Event</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/emcc-campus" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">EMCC Campus</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/emcc-programs" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">EMCC Programs</a></div></div></div> Tue, 04 Nov 2014 21:44:57 +0000 MARDH70971 186 at Loving to Help Others /profiles/volume-2-issue-2/loving-help-others <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Regina Gonzalez </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/profile" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Profiles</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/profiles/175-seantingle.jpg?itok=T04iGGPS"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/profiles/175-seantingle.jpg?itok=T04iGGPS" width="480" height="320" alt="Writing Center Tutor Sean Tingle" title="Writing Center Tutor Sean Tingle" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>It can be easy to feel intimidated by the idea of seeking out tutoring, but students should not feel that way. Sean Tingle is a tutor at the Writing Center in Estrella Hall at Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC). Tingle has a lot of patience with his students.</p> <p>Tingle grew up in an inconsistent home; he would move to different states since the age of one.  His father was in the Air Force and his family moved constantly. He lived in California, Texas, Washington, D.C., Mississippi and finally Arizona by the age of 13. He resided in Glendale, Ariz. until the age of 17 and graduated from Mountain Ridge High School.</p> <p>He attended Glendale Community College (GCC) while still in high school and then transferred his credits to Northern Arizona University. There he received a bachelor's degree in Humanities and later a master's degree in English. </p> <p>He found his passion for helping others when he was attending GCC.</p> <p>When Tingle was a baby, his father would carry him around, point to things all over, tell him what they were called, and explain what they were. This sparked a lifelong desire to learn and help others.</p> <p>Tingle's parents would help him a lot and it lead him to helping others. He would help his little brother and cousins with schoolwork.  He also worked at Paradise Education Center where he helped students after school.  Tingle said, “Working with the children at Paradise Education Center was a wonderful and rewarding experience.”</p> <p>Tingle taught English in Japan during the 2012/13 school year. As a result of his journey to Japan he learned the Japanese language. He taught at EMCC for one year before leaving to Japan, and then returned to EMCC the day after coming home. He loved his experience there, but he was excited to return to EMCC.</p> <p>His passion for helping others grew because he thinks learning is very important.  Tingle said, “All students are capable of success. I want to help them achieve their goals”.  In the future he wants to continue teaching and helping students. He hopes to eventually earn a doctorate degree.</p> <p>He is now a tutor and professor at EMCC. Many students call him “Mr. Sean”. He teaches English 081, 091 and 101. He recently received an award from EMCC’s Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society for being an exceptional mentor.</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/learning-styles" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Learning Styles</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-achievement" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Achievement</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-challenges" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Challenges</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-support" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Support</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/employees" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Employees</a></div></div></div> Mon, 03 Mar 2014 20:37:55 +0000 ERIXL33951 175 at How the Honors Program Honors its Students /focus-learning/volume-2-issue-2/how-honors-program-honors-its-students <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Eva Ziegler</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/focus-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Focus on Learning</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/focus-learning/171-hvillalpandohonors.png?itok=h_Xh0SJf"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/focus-learning/171-hvillalpandohonors.png?itok=h_Xh0SJf" width="431" height="452" alt="Honors Student Villalpando" title="Honors Student Villalpando" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>All students, upon enrolling in Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC), have had to take that nerve-wracking test that determines what level of classes they are assigned. One student, Hyacinth Villalpando, still remembers that day she took the EMCC placement test.</p> <p>Walking into that dim room with its tiny computers, she did not have the highest expectations, except to make classes at the one hundred level. However, to her surprise, that was the day she discovered that she had made it into Honors.</p> <p>Villalpando says, “I remember thinking, why would I want to be in Honors? It just sounds like more unnecessary work than college has to be.” To her surprise, the Honors Program offered her things such as a loving staff, scholarships, events and a taste of the culture of competition - this year's Honors study topic.</p> <p>In fact, a lot of students have this same negative view at first. When given the prospect of joining the Honors Program, many students might automatically assume that it means lengthy homework, difficult classes and strict teachers. Those same students would be correct, but not in the way that they think. Villalpando herself used to be one of those skeptical students. However, being in the Honors Program has changed her mind completely.</p> <p>She said, “Yes, the Honors Program gives lengthy work because it is made to challenge the students. The classes are difficult, but only to prepare students for their future. Finally, while the instructors may be strict, they are the most caring and encouraging people I have ever encountered.”</p> <p>Besides these benefits, the Honors Program offers many rewards students are unaware of. So what exactly are those perks and how can students gain access to the program?</p> <p>The first pathway into the program is the Presidents’ Scholarship, which can be obtained by either testing into Honors, or by being in the top 15 percent of one’s high school graduating class and receiving high placement test scores. This two-year scholarship covers tuition for up to 15 credits every semester.</p> <p>However, students who have not met these qualifications should not fret. There is also the Honors Achievement Award given to current EMCC students. Students who obtain a cumulative G.P.A of a 3.25 qualify for this scholarship and are rewarded at the end of every semester for their hard work. Even if students do not qualify for Honors at enrollment, they are still presented with an opportunity to join every semester.</p> <p>Villalpando says, “Not only is the program helping me to adjust to a more challenging learning experience to prepare me for a university, but it’s ensuring that it’s more affordable and possible.”</p> <p>Having tuition covered is just one of several pluses. Alexander Andrews, Honors Program Director, went over some of the other Honors Program goodies. Andrews said, "Being a part of the Honors Program enables students to maximize their academic success.  Students who graduate with Honors or Honors Distinction are more likely to receive future scholarships at the University level."</p> <p>In fact, upon admittance to Honors, students are automatically invited to join Phi Theta Kappa. Phi Theta Kappa is the international Honor society of two-year colleges and academic programs. It offers scholarships for several Arizona universities including University of Arizona, Arizona State University, and Northern Arizona University. Phi Theta Kappa also offers an entire website that allows students to search and apply for multiple scholarships and being an Honors student gives them an edge for each one.</p> <p>Andrews says, “Along with scholarships, Honors makes students more eligible for internships and future jobs.” There are even specific scholarships that students can only get if they are in Honors. Andrews says, “Students prove to be hardworking and dedicated in their professional life if they mention that they are in Honors."</p> <p>Honors graduates are actually more likely to obtain a higher paying job. In a statistical study done by Arizona State University, researchers found that students who graduated in Honors with a G.P.A of 3.5 or higher, received a higher annual salary overall than those who did not. Students can also present scholarly research at the Honors Expo every Fall semester.</p> <p>When students are not in an Honors only cohort class, they must complete an Honors project and this is what they present. If a student's presentation ranks in the top categories, students are able to attend the Western Regional Honors Conference, which builds confidence and helps develop leadership skills.</p> <p>This event is also favorable to University Honors programs for students planning to transfer. It is also another way that the program is always looking to help their students achieve more because it allows students to put on display the hard work they have been striving for, regardless if they win or not.</p> <p>Andrews said, “In a way, we are building a community for the students. There are exclusive things that they get to go to, such as the symphony. They learn to be in a group together and obtain a better global perspective.” Villalpando herself raved about the symphony.</p> <p>She said, “I just recently went to the symphony. It was a beautiful experience that I did not expect. I think it’s something that everyone would enjoy, if given the chance. The Honors office gives me the tickets for free so I will definitely be going again!”</p> <p>Besides listening to the soothing music of the symphony, students can attend the Honors Forum lectures. These lectures always have an inspirational message to offer and are an intellectually stimulating experience for the students. At this year’s forum, Dr. Luis Fernandez gave a speech about the ideologies of a free market, while bestselling author Victor Villasenor gave a speech about dedication to family, education, and the harmony of the written word.</p> <p>The teachers in the program also revel in their jobs and find it rewarding to teach the Honors students. When asked why she enjoyed teaching Honors, Communications teacher Roselyn Turner said, "I love teaching Honors because students come with highly responsible behavior.  I like to build on that foundation for future opportunities such as Service Learning projects, and encourage and support the students."</p> <p>Because staff members like Turner enjoy the experience, it makes the classes all the more enjoyable for the students. In fact, in a study conducted by Palm Beach State University, they found that on average, Honors professors rated a 4.28 for overall quality and helpfulness while normal professors rated a 3.57.</p> <p>Turner teaches some of the Honors Only cohort classes. These classes consist entirely of Honors students. While the classes may seem intimidating at first, they actually do not contain as much rigorous work as students fear.</p> <p>Turner says of the classes, "Yes, there is a lot of work.  The work is not necessarily more difficult, it is just different.  It's not about writing a longer paper, but a more advanced paper or speech.  It's about the content that reflects their learning from the Service Learning project." Turner is just one of the many teachers in the Honors program at EMCC. However, it seems as if every staff member involved wants to keep Honors students on the right track.</p> <p>Sitting in the waiting room in the Honors office, one can find many encouraging posters and pictures of Honors students' achievements and essays framed for their excellence. Colorful encouragements serve as a reminder to students that they are the ones setting their limits.</p> <p>Turner says, "The Honors personnel are good people.  They keep close tabs on each student because they want every student to be successful."</p> <p>It seemed as if Villalpando had the same view, “Felipa is perhaps the most helpful person I have ever encountered while on campus. Alex is very organized and always willing to help and encourage me.”</p> <p>This year’s theme of the Honors Program is The Culture of Competition. The idea of this theme is that students will recognize what it means to be competitive. It doesn’t mean that they race to the top of the chart, or beat the other student’s grade point averages, but it is what they do to challenge themselves. Only when students are achieving their own personal goals, do they become a part of the competitive culture. This is why the Honors Program encourages students not to be afraid.</p> <p>Joining might be scary and intimidating, but to stand up to this fear and go beyond expectations is what makes a true Honors student.</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-achievement" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Achievement</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-engagement" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Engagement</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-support" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Support</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/emcc-programs" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">EMCC Programs</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/honors" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Honors</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/music" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Music</a></div></div></div> Mon, 03 Mar 2014 20:26:00 +0000 ERIXL33951 171 at Help Along the Way /focus-learning/volume-2-issue-2/help-along-way <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Valeria Flores</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/focus-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Focus on Learning</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/focus-learning/169-tutoringservicesrw.jpg?itok=ssS5qCoS"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/focus-learning/169-tutoringservicesrw.jpg?itok=ssS5qCoS" width="480" height="320" alt="Student Success Center at EMCC" title="Student Success Center at EMCC" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>“Help,” according to dictionary.com is defined as “to provide what is necessary to accomplish a task or satisfy a need.”  It is good to ask for help. At school, tutors are there to help you make your life that much easier.</p> <p>At Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC), tutoring comes in various forms and many subjects. There is tutoring for math, biology, writing, as well as chemistry and other subjects. For students Samantha Sunderland, Lacey Holstein, and Elaina Pettit, tutoring is an effective tool that they use whenever they need help.</p> <p>Samantha Sunderland is a 20-year-old college student. She said she goes to tutoring for math.<br /> “Well, actually, my boyfriend helps me almost every day so he is kind of like my personal tutor,” Sunderland said.</p> <p>Sunderland said that she always gains something when she goes to tutoring. If she could choose a personal tutor over a public tutor, she would pick a personal one.</p> <p>Elaina Pettit on the other hand, does not use the math success part of tutoring, but she uses the Writing Success Center to help her with her papers. She said that the class she has to write the most papers in is English.</p> <p>“The Writing Center has helped me with making my papers better and I realize what I do wrong with my writing. They also do not judge me when I go there and, therefore, I do not feel bad in seeking their help,” Pettit said.</p> <p>EMCC hosts up to 15,000 students annually. Not all students are always on campus, but when there are a lot of students present, the Writing Center can get set back.</p> <p>“Each time I have been to the Writing Center, they helped me right away, but I have heard of times where students wait a long time before being helped,” Pettit said.</p> <p>Tutors need to have advanced degrees in their area of expertise to be hired by the Success Center. “Each tutor that has helped me out has gotten straight to the problem of my paper and told me what I needed. The tutors also help me find what is wrong with my paper. They teach me in that sense,” Pettit concluded.</p> <p>Lacey Holstein has used tutoring for her chemistry class. “Tutoring has helped me understand some areas that I had trouble with,” Holstein said.</p> <p>The atmosphere that is created in all of the tutoring areas is one that is approachable. Being comfortable in an area is very important because it allows for a student to keep going back to it. “I do feel comfortable going there if I find myself in a tricky situation in class,” Holstein said.</p> <p>Being the tutor is completely different from being the person getting help. It takes a person with patience and good people skills as well as a good sense of knowledge to be able to do this. Tom Domek, tutor at the Writing Center, is the type of person who makes you feel comfortable while he helps you.</p> <p>“Helping the students get comfortable is important because it all depends on how you speak to people. I have worked with people before and it takes practice in how you talk to them. It is also easier to get the students to talk about what their context is about in the paper,” Domek said.</p> <p>That is not all. Domek has a journalism degree as well as being a published author and being a lecturer. Although tutoring is only a part-time job, Domek has a background that allows him to go into different paths. “I have a degree in journalism as well as in creative writing. I would want to become a full-time teacher at Estrella and the paths that I would be able to follow are because of my background is journalism, creative writing and literature,” he said.</p> <p>It seems that when you are a tutor, you have to worry about a lot of things. Not only do they have to worry about making the student comfortable in the subject that they are in but also do they have to help them understand what it is they were doing. Writing does not come easily to some people, but others have the gift of writing.</p> <p>“I always enjoyed writing and it felt natural. I have no anxiety when I write but when you help a student get less anxiety when writing, then that means that we have helped them,” Domek said.</p> <p>In comparison, Catherine Luse is a full-time tutor for the Writing Center. She does not want to teach classes and prefers the one-on-one tutoring. “There are different rules that apply to different paper types so it is almost like knowing a different range of subjects,” Luse said.</p> <p>There are different formats of papers that the Writing Success Center helps to edit, including the American Psychological Association (APA), Modern Language Association (MLA), American Chemical Society (ACS), and the Associated Press (AP) styles.</p> <p>Luse has been a tutor for five weeks. “When you tutor someone, you really understand the person and it is easier to help them,” Luse said.</p> <p>EMCC also has the online Writing Center. That is where the students can turn in their papers online and the tutors edit those papers. There is a downside to online editing though.</p> <p>“Online, we can’t spend a lot of time editing a paper. We have to give edits in a short amount of words so that the student can understand us in order to be clear about what needs to be done. When we do the one-on-one tutoring, we are allowed to give more feedback and if the students have a question, they can ask us,” Luse said.</p> <p>For some reason, sometimes students do not learn crucial things in high school. “Students are able to learn here and sometimes we teach them things that they didn’t know before. It makes classwork that much easier,” Luse said.</p> <p>Chelsey Peterson is an EMCC student. Peterson goes to the Writing Success Center. “I don’t go there very often, but when I have a big paper to write, I go there for help,” Peterson said.</p> <p>It takes practice to become good at something. “Personal tutors are a little more, well, personal, but school tutors seem to have a little more experience depending on the environment,” Peterson said.  “They help me improve my writing and how to think about structures I can use for my next work,” she added.</p> <p>The Writing Success Center is one of the few places that students can go to when they need help editing a paper but it is not the only resource that they have at their disposal. The Math Success and the Science Success Centers are available as well to help students with their homework.</p> <p>For more information, please go to <a href="http://www.estrellamountain.edu/students/tutoring" rel="nofollow">http://www.estrellamountain.edu/students/tutoring</a>.</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/active-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Active Learning</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/emcc-campus" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">EMCC Campus</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/learning-styles" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Learning Styles</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-achievement" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Achievement</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-challenges" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Challenges</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-engagement" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Engagement</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-support" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Support</a></div></div></div> Mon, 03 Mar 2014 20:16:00 +0000 ERIXL33951 169 at Whatever You Need Is Right Around the Corner /editorials/volume-2-issue-2/whatever-you-need-right-around-corner <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Antonica Hernandez</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/editorial" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Editorials</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/editorials/161-editorialhernandez-everythingatfingertipsrw.jpg?itok=x5RBU3AR"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/editorials/161-editorialhernandez-everythingatfingertipsrw.jpg?itok=x5RBU3AR" width="480" height="320" alt="EMCC&#039;s new Estrella Hall North" title="EMCC&#039;s new Estrella Hall North" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>Perhaps the best thing about community college is that it offers all of the same resources to students at a more affordable price than say, a university. Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC) is the perfect example of a student’s cheaper alternative.</p> <p>There is just about everything you can think of on campus - a bookstore, an advisement and enrollment center, a café, a tutoring and learning center, and a beautiful library that was remodeled to accommodate students’ needs.</p> <p>Along with all of the wonderful resources that are offered, are even more wonderful people that are always willing and happy to assist with whatever one may need. Do you need help choosing classes that are the best fit for next semester? One of the many advisors in the enrollment center is likely to put you on the right track.</p> <p>I myself had a great experience with one of the advisors; she was so kind to me and took the time to listen to what I needed, and then proceeded to help me figure out what classes I needed to take in order to stay on track for my associate’s degree. The advisors make the process to transfer to a university much easier than it would be without guidance.</p> <p>Along with centers for assistance, it is awesome having a place to grab a meal in between classes without actually having to leave campus and giving up your parking spot, which makes the cafeteria/café so convenient. They offer a variety of food choices; healthy food and then enough of a selection to satisfy that little junk craving.</p> <p>The Starbucks on site is also extremely beneficial and much appreciated, especially to those such as myself who have early morning classes but are not willing to sacrifice that extra ten minutes of sleep to get our coffee fix.</p> <p>Having a bookstore on campus serves as a major advantage as well. Rather than ordering books from an online website that may not be trustworthy, it is easy to pop right in before, after, or in between classes and purchase what you need. They also offer the option to rent your textbooks instead to save money.</p> <p>Books that are required for just about each course stock the shelves along with writing utensils, notebooks, note cards, and basically anything else you might find you need at some time during the semester.</p> <p>The newly renovated library is excellent for some down time. It is nice, quiet, and provides an opportunity to complete homework assignments uninterrupted or study for exams. EMCC student Sydney Jones said, “The new library is super nice! The librarians are very helpful both when a student needs to find a book, and also with all of the online resources (which are also really helpful!).”</p> <p>Knowing that there are so many resources and so many people to turn to should one need help with anything is extremely reassuring. It is comforting to know that there is a person to speak to for anything, and everything.</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-support" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Support</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/emcc-campus" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">EMCC Campus</a></div></div></div> Mon, 03 Mar 2014 19:22:03 +0000 ERIXL33951 161 at Searching for the Perfect Internship /editorials/volume-2-issue-2/searching-perfect-internship <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Valeria Flores</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/editorial" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Editorials</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/editorials/159-interning.jpg?itok=M9epDd6a"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/editorials/159-interning.jpg?itok=M9epDd6a" width="480" height="320" alt="Intern" title="Ryan Wright, photo intern with &quot;The Lion&#039;s Perspective&quot; working with Journalism instructor, Selina Schuh." /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>Interning is hard. You have to get a resume, a cover letter and more experience so that the internship is yours. You are a nervous wreck while waiting for the response of whether or not you got the internship. If you do end up getting the internship, you do not know how you are going to get treated.  There are so many things to do to prepare, which makes it hard to know where to start.</p> <p>That was me up until a month ago. I didn’t have a resume or a cover letter and I wanted to apply to an internship that could help me out in my career. There was so much preparation that I had to do in order to get those things ready for the application and ultimately, the internship.</p> <p>Lauren Berger from the internqueen.com blog, talks about a few myths about internships that I surely didn’t know about and that I originally believed.</p> <p>Internships provide novices with an opportunity for work experience so that they can get an even better shot at gaining the job that they want to get. Then there are the internships in the movies that have you getting coffee all day.</p> <p>Berger said that, “many companies hire interns to work on actual projects alongside full-time staff.”</p> <p>Honestly, that was something that I was scared of but now, I’m not sure that I am.</p> <p>Another one of the myths attached to the internships is that the best internships are with the best companies out there. Regardless of whether or not that is true, large companies may not spend as much time on hands-on-training with their interns since they tend to be busier.</p> <p>I remember hearing from a classmate that one of her friends had gotten an internship with a well-known artist and ended up not really liking it because the artist was just telling him to go fetch coffee. He then moved on to another internship with another artist that was not as well known and her friend ended up liking the work because this new artist was so hands on.</p> <p>Berger said that, “Experience at smaller companies is just as valuable. Most of the time, smaller companies have more responsibilities and more opportunities to be hands-on.”</p> <p>The hardest part is also finding the internship. There are so many out there that have a lot of guidelines that a student has to meet and sometimes you do not end up meeting them. There is nothing wrong with trying, and you’d be surprised about how much you would gain as a company’s intern.</p> <p>These opportunities may help you hone professional skills and self-confidence, or build your resume at the very least. Again, nothing is wrong with trying to gather insight into a particular industry or organizational culture. Internships are also essential to establishing connections and building a network of contacts early, which in turn becomes a great asset for your career.</p> <p>“Rather than giving up on getting any experience, look for opportunities outside your industry that provide similar experiences,” Berger said.</p> <p>At the moment, I don’t have a lot of experience outside of journalism but in the near future I will get more experience outside of this field.</p> <p>Internships should be something that everyone should take advantage of because it’s something that is going to help you in the long run. Experience is key to any job and although sometimes it’s easier to learn on the job, interning is learning on the job.</p> <p>“If you are interested in interning,” Landis Elliot, the Manager of Internships at Estrella Mountain Community College said, “please stop by my office in the Career and Transfer Center so we can talk about potential opportunities and how to get started.”</p> <p>To contact the Career and Transfer Center for help, visit <a href="http://www.estrellamountain.edu/students/career-services" rel="nofollow">http://www.estrellamountain.edu/students/career-services</a></p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/internships" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Internships</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-support" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Support</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/active-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Active Learning</a></div></div></div> Mon, 03 Mar 2014 19:17:35 +0000 ERIXL33951 159 at