Lions Perspective - Campus Event /tags/campus-event en Student Success Fair: A Fair Impact on Students /campus-life/volume-3-issue-1/student-success-fair-fair-impact-students <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Shea Huffman</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/campus-life" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Campus Life</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/campus-life/242-2015emccstudentsuccessfairphotocourtesyofemcc.jpg?itok=Mp6d0MEf"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/campus-life/242-2015emccstudentsuccessfairphotocourtesyofemcc.jpg?itok=Mp6d0MEf" width="480" height="320" alt="2015 Student Success Fair" title="The thrid annual Student Success Fair took place March 25-26, 2015" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-add-images field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/medium/public/robert_jenkins_at_emcc_ssf_photo_credit_shea_huffman.jpg?itok=_hmJxGOe" width="165" height="220" alt="Robert Jenkins" title="Robert Jenkins demonstrates CPR at the Student Success Fair" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>On March 25 and 26, 2015, during the spring semester, Estrella Mountain Community College held its third annual Student Success Fair, an open house fair that is free to students and the public. The fair was conceived in the hopes that it would promote student success here on campus and beyond, such as at a university or on the student’s career path. This was the third year that EMCC hosted the fair, and students raved that this was the best one yet. Not only was it entertaining and helpful to those students who needed it, but it also had a large impact on them as well.</p> <p>“There were a lot of people! There was music playing and all of the people at the booths really pushed to get people involved,” sophomore student Kaitlin Neises recalls the event. “They even stopped us to talk, and showed us all about the little stamp booklet-the ‘graduation passport’—and where you can go around to get stamps. They also showed us how to snag free popcorn and even possibly a free tee-shirt. All of the booths had a lot of information and the people running them were all very friendly.” However, the fair’s “bells and whistles” could not compare to what some students took from it.</p> <p>Robert Jenkins, also a sophomore at EMCC, says that he happened upon the fair by accident. He and his friends were just getting some coffee at the café when they bumped into the fair and had to stop to check it out: “One of the fire science professors came up to me and asked if I could demonstrate how to do CPR on an adult, because he knew I was CPR certified. I learned different ways on how to see if a patient is conscious or not breathing. I also learned a new way to check a patient’s pulse, which I thought was really cool.” But that was not what really set the fair apart for Jenkins. What really made the Student Success Fair stand out to him was the help they gave to him shortly after: “They told me that I had to take the EMT and fire-science course to get started with my career. They also mentioned that once I finished the EMT course, a faster way to becoming a firefighter would be to join the Goodyear Firefighter Cadet Program. They explained that if I did that, I should be able to be employed and pay for my schooling to becoming a paramedic firefighter. After talking to the fire science professors, I felt a lot more comfortable on what I want to do as a career, and I am very grateful that they were there to give me all of that advice.”</p> <p>This was not the only successful student encounter at the fair. EMCC Student Morgan Grant raved about the benefits of attending the Student Success Fair, and how it certainly fulfilled its mission to help students: “My experience at the Student Success Fair was great. I was pleasantly surprised that the fair had so much to offer to any passing student. I learned about things that were available that I previously didn’t even know existed. I felt like my success was cared about on a personal level from the minute I started talking with the people at the welcome table. It was more than just a fair. It was all about offering opportunities and help to many students that may not have been brave enough to ask.” All in all, the student success fair was-indeed-a success.</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-achievement" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Achievement</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/campus-event" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Campus Event</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-engagement" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Engagement</a></div></div></div> Mon, 27 Apr 2015 20:34:38 +0000 MARDH70971 242 at Black History Month Art Display /campus-life/volume-3-issue-1/black-history-month-art-display <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Kayt Ludi</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/campus-life" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Campus Life</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/campus-life/190-blackhistorymonth.jpg?itok=khJhoyU2"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/campus-life/190-blackhistorymonth.jpg?itok=khJhoyU2" width="480" height="320" alt="Black History Month" title="EMCC Black History Month Celebration" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>To celebrate Black History Month, Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC) presented an art exhibit entitled “Civil Rights in America” at the beginning of the year.  The exhibit featured seven photos and nine photomontages by Stephen Marc.</p> <p> The images encompassed important events, figures, and landmarks in the context of Black history and the civil rights movement in the United States. Some of Marc’s pieces depicted President Obama on the campaign trail, the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial, activist Angela Davis, and a montage of different sites involved in the tragedy of Emmett Till.</p> <p> Another montage showed marchers here in Phoenix commemorating the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington and Martin Luther King Jr.’s birthday, with the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D. C. as a backdrop. And hovering in the ‘sky’ of the montage was an image from an 1864 issue of Harper’s Weekly, entitled “Emancipated Slaves, White and Colored.”</p> <p> According to Austin Shepard, Director of Academic Enrichment at EMCC and who was instrumental in organizing the display, “Stephen Marc was a great choice for the Black History Month Art Display because of his strong interest in Black History and student success.”</p> <p> Stephen Marc is a professor of art in the Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts at Arizona State University. Marc describes himself as “a photographer/digital montage artist engaged in weaving together, and bringing to life, the places and remnants of the African Diaspora, with an emphasis on United States history.” Marc describes his work as “an interpretative relocation of, and commentary on the limited representations and accounts of the black experience, into the early years of the 20th century, that were usually defined from outside the community.”</p> <p> To learn more about the artist and see samples of his work, please visit: <a href="http://ihr.asu.edu/origins-art/marc" rel="nofollow">http://ihr.asu.edu/origins-art/marc</a></p> <p> </p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/campus-event" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Campus Event</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/emcc-campus" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">EMCC Campus</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/cultural-celebration" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Cultural Celebration</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/educating-community" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Educating the Community</a></div></div></div> Tue, 04 Nov 2014 22:06:47 +0000 MARDH70971 190 at One Billion Rising at EMCC /campus-life/volume-3-issue-1/one-billion-rising-emcc <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Ernesto Oliva</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/campus-life" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Campus Life</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/campus-life/189-onebillionrisingcopy.jpg?itok=8R9ltfUi"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/campus-life/189-onebillionrisingcopy.jpg?itok=8R9ltfUi" width="480" height="320" alt="One Billion Rising" title="EMCC Students Dancing at the One Billion Rising Event" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>On February 2014, Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC) participated in the global “One Billion Rising” dance campaign to raise awareness and to end violence against women and young girls. </p> <p>The “One Billion Rising” campaign created a choreographed dance to “break the chain.” The purpose of the dance is for women to figuratively “break off the chain” their abuser has on them.</p> <p>Worldwide, violence against women happens often. One of the event coordinators, Dr. Sandy Zetlan stated, “One out of three women in the world are beaten or raped one time in their life.”</p> <p>The dance is all about a woman owning her space and not being scared to dance in public. Sociology professor, Dr. Olga Tsoudis led the dance for faculty and students as she demonstrated each new move that had its own meaning.</p> <p>During the event, various women took the stage and shared their story on how they survived the consistent abuse suffered earlier in their lives. Student Andrew Tran stated, “Being surrounded by all of these women who have survived being mistreated by men is inspiring. It’s also great that Estrella Mountain Community College is shining some light on this subject.”</p> <p>The outside courtyard of Estrella Hall was decorated with inspirational T-shirts that promoted encouragement with such phrases like “battered but not broken” and “break the silence.”</p> <p>Student Jemimah Garcia said, “I’m glad that I attend a college where these types of issues about women are important. It makes me feel like I am making a difference for others.”</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-engagement" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Engagement</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/educating-community" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Educating the Community</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/campus-event" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Campus Event</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/activism" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Activism</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/active-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Active Learning</a></div></div></div> Tue, 04 Nov 2014 22:04:01 +0000 MARDH70971 189 at Student Success Fair at EMCC /campus-life/volume-3-issue-1/student-success-fair-emcc <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Ernesto Oliva </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/campus-life" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Campus Life</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/campus-life/186-studentsuccessfair.jpg?itok=2mL0qzI5"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/campus-life/186-studentsuccessfair.jpg?itok=2mL0qzI5" width="480" height="320" alt="Student Success Fair" title="EMCC&#039;s Student Success Fair" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>“It is the perfect weather to be out here today! So many great opportunities and a positive vibe,” said student Analise Soto at the Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC) Student Success Fair held this past March.</p> <p>The purpose of the fair, according to Christina Izaguirre, one of the organizers, is “to celebrate students’ success and help them achieve their personal and academic goals.” “Overall, I am excited to see the constant flow of interaction between students, faculty and staff here at the Student Success Fair,” said Izaguirre. Students received a tri-fold graduation passport that encouraged them to learn about their campus and resources while knowing how to prepare for their individual graduation date.</p> <p>The passport cover contained room for a date, which the students filled out after they visited the zones and determined their graduation date. The passport also contained a map of the campus and key zones the students needed to visit for their passport stamps. There were four zones, which consisted of the green enroll zone, blue discover zone, red learn zone, and purple lead zone. The passport was completed with a black stamp when students took a picture with Rory, the school’s mascot.  </p> <p>Once students completed their graduation passport they received a free EMCC T-shirt that could be personalized with their graduation date. In addition, the fair gave students the opportunity to learn more about the different clubs and organizations at EMCC. “The students who opened up to me about their goals in life were really amazing. It felt like I was making a difference in their lives,” said Ursula Jackson from the Culinary Club.   </p> <p>Jackson shared the story on how she found her calling in culinary arts and wanted to do the same for others. By sharing her story with students, she felt it would inspire them to seek opportunities for themselves. Another highlight for many students was all of the food being handed out. “I think it is really neat that EMCC is offering all of this free food. I mean, who doesn’t love free food?” said student Sam Roybal. Roybal explained that she previously attended Glendale Community College and was surprised at how EMCC showed so much care for their students.  “I feel proud and privileged to attend EMCC because the school puts on so many events to help me with my educational goals”.</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-achievement" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Achievement</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-support" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Support</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/campus-event" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Campus Event</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/emcc-campus" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">EMCC Campus</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/emcc-programs" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">EMCC Programs</a></div></div></div> Tue, 04 Nov 2014 21:44:57 +0000 MARDH70971 186 at EMCC is Celebrating and Educating About Black History Month /campus-life/volume-2-issue-1/emcc-celebrating-and-educating-about-black-history-month <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Jessica Stewart</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/campus-life" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Campus Life</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/campus-life/139-blackhistorymonth.jpg?itok=J8hidlyQ"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/campus-life/139-blackhistorymonth.jpg?itok=J8hidlyQ" width="480" height="331" alt="Black History Month Celebrations on Campus" title="Black History Month Celebrations on Campus" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> </p> <p>In February, students and faculty of Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC) showed their appreciation for American history by celebrating Black History Month.</p> <p>All month long the college was hosting events to celebrate and educate the community on the achievements and contributions African Americans have made to American culture. Events featured cultural exploration, commemoration of prominent leaders, and various educational workshops and lectures.</p> <p>Among the proceedings was the second annual Black History Conference, a program focused on educating college and high school students in depth about the different aspects of black history. Director of Student Life and Leadership/Athletics, Herschel Jackson has been involved in coordinating this event since its debut last year, and was ecstatic about the turnout of over 400 students, 35 of which were still in high school.</p> <p>For Jackson, the purpose lay heavily in educating about the deep impact African Americans have had on American history. He stated, “History books teach us about Martin Luther King and Rosa Parks, but there is a rich history neglected. It’s a shame it’s not taught to children from very early on.”</p> <p>An article about Black History Month entitled “The Debate Rages On” expresses the notion that with all the accomplishments in racial equality, some feel Black History Month is unnecessary or even racist. Jackson disagreed, expressing a need for change in educational representation, “Ideally, history books would have a comprehensive outline of all immigrant development. American history is a melting pot, but currently history books only focus on the dominant elements, while glossing over minority contributions.”     </p> <p>Honors Program Director and English Professor, Alexander Andrews, echoed a desire for better education about black history. “My biggest grievance is that history books, particularly K-12, teach slavery as a side note, when actually it was a major event in our country. The economic benefits of slavery propelled us to becoming the richest and most powerful nation.” This fact is confirmed in an article entitled “Agriculture in History”, which states that agricultural slavery was highly profitable for the U.S. In 1860, cotton exports alone accounted for nearly 60 percent of the nation’s total exports.</p> <p>EMCC student Christopher Poole felt that black history is essentially American history, and should be celebrated year round. When discussing the struggles of African Americans today he said, “There are still barriers before us. Stereotypes are still prevalent, and racism still exists, just slightly subdued.” Poole cited poor portrayal of African Americans and other minority cultures in the media as a factor and said we needed to follow Dr. King’s dream and unite.</p> <p>From students to administration, the message was clear: Black History Month is not only a time to celebrate and honor African Americans, African American culture and contributions to our society, but also to focus on what we can do to better our future in becoming the best and most culturally inclusive nation in the world.</p> <p> </p> <p> </p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/educating-community" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Educating the Community</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/ethnicity" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Ethnicity</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/campus-event" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Campus Event</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/cultural-celebration" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Cultural Celebration</a></div></div></div> Thu, 26 Sep 2013 03:48:35 +0000 SELCB60601 139 at Earth Week: Make Your Voice Heard /campus-life/volume-2-issue-1/earth-week-make-your-voice-heard <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Chelsey Petersen</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/campus-life" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Campus Life</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/campus-life/137-earthweek.jpg?itok=huGjRSfn"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/campus-life/137-earthweek.jpg?itok=huGjRSfn" width="320" height="480" alt="Earth Week: Make Your Voice Heard" title="Art Creaded From Recycled Goods" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>Earth Week attracted students who wanted to get into the “green” spirit with activities and movies.  </p> <p>People may think that all they need to do to contribute to Earth Week is to recycle their plastic soda bottle or pick up a piece of trash on the side walk.  Certainly recycling and collecting trash is helpful, but there is a larger goal behind living green.</p> <p>EMCC Sustainability Team Co-Chair, Nadine Johnson, believes that “Earth Week represents a time to celebrate environmental conservation and responsibility.” Earth Week is about taking control of situations that can be controlled if we put our minds to it. Additionally, EMCC student Kaitlyn Thompson is “glad that there are people who care”.</p> <p>During the Earth Week festivities, a couple of movies were presented that expanded on the idea of what Earth Week and caring for the environment is really about. One of the films was “Sharkwater”, a documentary that followed Rob Stewart on his quest to save sharks being illegally fished and killed for their fins. Stewart ventured to Costa Rica with Paul Watson, a long-time defender of sharks. Stewart explained that sharks are not as dangerous as everyone believes. After spending many hours amongst sharks, his research shows that “It doesn’t want to hurt you and it’s the most beautiful thing you’ve ever seen.” Stewart also goes on to say that the reason sharks have been depicted as such frightening creatures is because “The media […] loves to have a monster.”</p> <p>Stewart and Watson went on a grueling journey, complete with danger and legal issues, discovered the scope of the undercover shark fin industry. They eventually had to flee Costa Rica to avoid being arrested on the charges of attempted murder after they ran into an illegal fishing boat.</p> <p>Another film, “Otter 501”, followed Katie, a young woman striving to become a marine biologist. While vacationing in Monterey at her uncle’s house for six months, Katie comes to terms with the positive and negative aspects of being a marine biologist, after she finds a baby sea otter abandoned on the beach. This event pushed her to connect with members of the Monterey Bay Aquarium who are conducting studies on sea otters. Katie helps the animals by surveying them and recording information about what they are doing and when they are doing it. Katie creates a special bond with the otter she rescued, and in turn begins to love all of the otters and wants to help them.</p> <p>The three main characters of these documentaries reveal the larger meaning of Earth Week: Make your voice heard. Do not be afraid to speak up about issues that are bothering you about the environment. Stewart, Watson, and Katie decided to speak up and be heard.</p> <p>.</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/campus-event" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Campus Event</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/emcc-campus" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">EMCC Campus</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/activism" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Activism</a></div></div></div> Mon, 23 Sep 2013 19:28:02 +0000 MAN2026125 137 at Audrey Hepburn at Her Finest /campus-life/volume-2-issue-1/audrey-hepburn-her-finest <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Britni Delgado</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/campus-life" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Campus Life</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/campus-life/120-audreyhepburn.jpg?itok=CtaXP0a3"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/campus-life/120-audreyhepburn.jpg?itok=CtaXP0a3" width="480" height="390" alt="Monica Nguyen, artist" title="Monica Nguyen, artist" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>The Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC) Juried Art Show caught students’ attention as they passed through the Estrella Hall south entrance. One piece in particular, created by 19 year old student artist Monica Nguyen, was striking.</p> <p>Her portrait titled “Audrey Hepburn” was created with fabrics: cotton, silk, and ribbons, and depicted the famous movie star. “I created this piece mainly for my art professor. He said ‘look for a person to do it on’ and I did Hepburn because she is classy and pretty,” said Nguyen. Audrey Hepburn was a British actress and humanitarian who had been recognized for her talent at a very young age. Her beautiful and classy look also put her in the spotlight, as a famous icon in both film and fashion.</p> <p>Nguyen then began talking about the budget for this project and the fact that it was difficult finding the materials. To find many of these materials she had had to go to Wal-Mart, Michael’s, and Joann’s. The amount of money she spent on this portrait was $200.</p> <p>Current EMCC student, Wanda McClendon, adores Nguyen’s work. McClendon was so fascinated by the piece that she stood and observed it for about 15 minutes. After the interview with Nguyen was finished, McClendon praised her for the amazing talent. When McClendon was asked what she thought about the portrait she said, “It is just incredible. I am speechless.”</p> <p>McClendon really enjoys artwork and she enjoyed this portrait in particular because it is nothing like she has ever seen before. She said this piece reminded her of the film “Breakfast at Tiffany’s”, a film that came out in 1961 in which Hepburn played the main character, Holly Golightly. When asked to rate the Audrey Hepburn piece on a scale from 1-10, McClendon responded, “To rate this piece, I would give it a 10 plus!”</p> <p> </p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/art" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Art</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-engagement" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Engagement</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-achievement" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Achievement</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/campus-event" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Campus Event</a></div></div></div> Mon, 23 Sep 2013 17:56:39 +0000 SELCB60601 120 at Changing Women’s Lives with Slam Poetry /campus-life/volume-2-issue-1/changing-womens-lives-slam-poetry <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Britni Delgado </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/campus-life" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Campus Life</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/campus-life/118-slampoetry.jpg?itok=zOkI1m3S"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/campus-life/118-slampoetry.jpg?itok=zOkI1m3S" width="360" height="480" alt="Poet Azteca" title="Poet Azteca" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC) invited artistic expression during Women’s History Month. Students could attend short events to watch artists demonstrate what Women’s History is all about.</p> <p>One event that stood out was the performance of slam poetry. Marc Smith created this form of poetry in a Chicago lounge during the early 1980s. Slam poetry as a deep expression of emotion spoken out loud. The concept of each poem depends on what the artist is trying to convey. Some try to inspire the audience, while others compete against their peers.</p> <p>One performer to take the stage at EMCC was Azteca.  She has always expressed herself through art, but it was in the fifth grade that she wrote her first poem and fell in love with the art form. “I am focused on reaching somebody. If I reach at least one person, that is enough for me,” said Azteca. She loves language and wrote all of her poems about her life experiences.</p> <p>“Female empowerment is huge. I love our women, the culture, being a Latina, and I love the Hispanic culture,” said Azteca. For years she has written poems about self-respect, empowerment of women, and the survival of many obstacles, including cancer.</p> <p>One of her favorite poems is “Chile in My Spit.” She said that this poem is a perfect introduction to her. The poem contains a lot of Spanglish, but a listener can still understand her point, even if s/he does not speak Spanish.</p> <p>As Azteca stepped on stage, she started to perform her slam poetry in front of many students at EMCC. There was a good vibe and the people listening to her were engaged. She performed “Chile In My Spit” and “August 9th, 2005,” a poem written exactly one year after she survived Hodgkin’s disease.</p> <p>In between poems, she also motivated the crowd with a few words. In her short speech she targeted women. “From woman to woman: a lot of the time we find ourselves in competition with each other instead of uniting with each other, which we should be able to do. We should be able to give another woman a compliment without decreasing the value of ourselves,” said Azteca.</p> <p>After her set on stage, EMCC student Karla Urquiz commented on Azteca’s performance. “I like how Azteca is not afraid to speak both English and Spanish because that is her culture and I really liked her cancer survival poem. I can relate to that,” said Urquiz. She also mentioned that she came out to this because she has never seen slam poetry before, but that she has always been interested in poetry.</p> <p>Azteca’s friend Divine also performed and just like Azteca, Divine’s work focused on female empowerment. Both not only talk about it in their poetry, but also have taken practical steps to empower women. Divine has established a company called Encore as well as a workshop space where women can go and lounge while talking about their lives. Divine also hosts a focus group in which members discuss how domestic violence has touched their lives. In the same building, Azteca runs a hair salon. Both women are trying to make a difference in the lives of women.</p> <p> </p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/activism" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Activism</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/cultural-celebration" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Cultural Celebration</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/educating-community" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Educating the Community</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/ethnicity" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Ethnicity</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/campus-event" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Campus Event</a></div></div></div> Mon, 23 Sep 2013 17:53:38 +0000 SELCB60601 118 at The Humannequin Project: Rethinking Gender in a Global World /campus-life/volume-2-issue-1/humannequin-project-rethinking-gender-global-world <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Kaitlyn Thompson</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/campus-life" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Campus Life</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/campus-life/116-humannequins.jpg?itok=fXeFjpy0"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/campus-life/116-humannequins.jpg?itok=fXeFjpy0" width="480" height="270" alt="Humannequin Displays on Campus" title="Humannequin Displays on Campus" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>Women’s History Month provides a time to remember the strides women have made while acknowledging that women still have a long way to go before reaching equality. The Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC) campus celebrated Women’s History Month with a variety of events, including a poetry slam, mask making, the second annual Women’s Conference, a showing of the film series “Stop Calling me Girl”, a performance of “The Vagina Monologues”, and a political art display of “humannequins.”</p> <p>“The Humannequin Project is a representation of the Woman’s Right’s Movement,” commented student Angelique Martinez. The Humannequins are designed and created by EMCC students after intensive research on their assigned topics. “There is a different theme for the humannequins every year, and various classes participate in the project. Students have to do a lot of research to create posters and design their political art,” said Dr. Olga Tsoudis, originator of the Humannequin project.</p> <p>“I came up with the idea that mannequins could be used to represent social structures for people, after seeing displayed mannequin art at First Fridays,” commented Tsoudis. </p> <p>Angelique Martinez talks about the process: “We had to do a lot of research and create posters about our topics before we could begin the actual creation of the humannequins.  I learned a lot about gay rights that I was not aware of before. It was really informative.”</p> <p>Each humannequin is very different. “We all had various topics to do with woman’s rights; mine specifically was on gay families. I discussed the disadvantages of being a gay parent and how many states have laws and legislations against gay couples, making it difficult for them to adopt,” Martinez commented. The range of topics for the Humannequin Project made it so that the students viewing the political art had the opportunity to learn about multiple issues regarding gender, politics and the law as related to women.</p> <p>The actual creation of the humannequins allowed the students working on the project to be creative with their visual arguments. The students were given blank humannequins, which they were allowed to decorate in any form they wished. Martinez created her humannequin with the intention of bringing realism to the project. “I created my humannequin to look like a mother, and not like a typical stereotype. I wanted her to be seen as someone who could be a real person.”</p> <p>The students reuse the humannequins every year by painting over the previous students’ alterations. This year’s humannequin theme focused on gender, politics and the law.  Past topics included women’s rights across the globe, women’s rights in the United States, and gender issues in relation to family.</p> <p>Tsoudis is glad that Women’s History Month provides an opportunity to enlighten the minds of EMCC students through political art. “Women’s History Month is about more than just celebrating accomplishments; it’s about recognizing that there is still a lot of work that needs to be done,” stated Tsoudis.</p> <p>The display of humannequins attracts the attention of many students. While some humannequins are dressed as mothers, military officers or brides, others are more symbolically dressed in dresses made of condoms, portrayed as both female and male, or wearing a chained infant attached to an ankle.</p> <p>The Humannequin Project display lasted throughout the month of March, giving EMCC students the opportunity to engage with the art and research. “I enjoyed working on this project. It opened my eyes to a lot of gender related issues, and that women have to work really hard to get what they want,” said Martinez.</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/activism" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Activism</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/educating-community" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Educating the Community</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/campus-event" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Campus Event</a></div></div></div> Mon, 23 Sep 2013 17:39:21 +0000 MAN2026125 116 at Student Conference Allows Students to Shine /campus-life/volume-2-issue-1/student-conference-allows-students-shine <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Manuel Guerrero</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/campus-life" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Campus Life</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/campus-life/114-student-conference.jpg?itok=oUPsz0m2"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/campus-life/114-student-conference.jpg?itok=oUPsz0m2" width="480" height="320" alt="Students&#039; Poster Displays" title="Students&#039; Poster Displays" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>At the end of the spring semester, Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC) hosted the 2013 Student Conference, which featured 60 students from five different Maricopa community colleges.</p> <p>According to Heather Ortiz, the event coordinator, the total number of student participants increased significantly from last year.  “The student conference gives the students a chance to learn how to do effective research using multiple methods,” said Ortiz.</p> <p>Students were able to choose the topics and were required to document five credible sources from where they gathered their research. “This gives students a chance to show off what they learned and go through the entire research process, which will help them, moving forward,” said Ortiz. “Students were responsible to put their whole project together.”</p> <p>Overall, the students produced 17 oral presentations and 13 poster presentations. They were required to conduct rigorous research for the projects under the guidance of a faculty mentor.</p> <p>Jake Dull, a participant, did his oral presentation on the advantages to a battery-operated car compared to a gas-operated one. He did this by reading about the process of transforming a gas-powered car into an energy-efficient, battery- operated vehicle on a $5000 budget. He presented his research in a 10-minute PowerPoint presentation.</p> <p>“My real passion is in energy. I am going to be an electrical engineer,” said Dull, who started attending Arizona State University this fall. “I think this was a great idea to practice some of the things I am interested in and also better understand how electrical systems operate.”</p> <p>At the end of the day, three oral and three poster presentations were chosen for prizes. EMCC students swept the oral presentations awards: Ariel Cluckey, Aimee Graves, Rachel Shauger and Perla Palamino’s presentation entitled, “Measuring College Student Awareness on Education’s Title IX,” earned the top spot for the category. Adiam Yeghin, Marc Solace and Alexander Sciury’s group presentation “Student Views on Pro-Life Reproductive Rights” earned second place and Andrea Grana’s solo presentation, “Shedding Light and Saving Lives” earned third place in the same category.</p> <p>The three poster presentation winners were students from Gateway Community College, Glendale Community College and Phoenix College. All winners of the competition received scholarship money. First place winners earned up to $5,000. The well-earned money will help students achieve their educational goals, mostly at the university level.</p> <p>For more information on our annual Student Conference, please visit: <a href="http://www.estrellamountain.edu/conferences/student-conference" rel="nofollow">http://www.estrellamountain.edu/conferences/student-conference</a></p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-engagement" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Engagement</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-achievement" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Achievement</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/awards" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Awards</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/district-events" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">District Events</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/campus-event" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Campus Event</a></div></div></div> Mon, 23 Sep 2013 17:22:46 +0000 SELCB60601 114 at