Lions Perspective - Student Engagement /tags/student-engagement en Free Perks & Discounts for EMCC students /beyond-campus/volume-3-issue-1/free-perks-discounts-emcc-students <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Lindsey Minton</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/beyond-campus" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Beyond Campus</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/beyond-campus/244-studentdiscounts.jpg?itok=_8iCv7ed"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/beyond-campus/244-studentdiscounts.jpg?itok=_8iCv7ed" width="480" height="320" alt="Special discounts for MCCD students" title="There are special discounts for MCCD students" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>Being a Maricopa Community College student gets you many services for a discounted fee. One in particular is free!! Yes, free.</p> <p>As a Maricopa Community College student you<strong><a href="https://login.microsoftonline.com/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"> get Microsoft Office 365 free of charge</a></strong>. Office 365 is the latest version of Microsoft’s productivity suite and includes Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Access, OneNote, and more. It is available for offline and online use to best prepare you for class. As long as you are currently a student at one of the Maricopa Community Colleges, you’ll be able to use this software for free. You may benefit from this because you are able to install this service on up to five compatible computers as well as on five mobile devices, such as an iPad.</p> <p>To download and access your Microsoft Office, follow the appropriate steps. Note you will need your Maricopa student email account to sign in. You should verify that your MEID account is working and that you can log in to your Online Student Center or student Gmail account before you attempt to download the software.</p> <p>For new students who have just created their MEID (or for those who have reactivated it) there is a delay which can last from one to three hours after the MEID is activated before they can use it to download Office 365.</p> <p>Another advantage of being an Estrella Mountain Community College student is that you are able to get discounts at the YMCA.<a href="http://www.estrellamountain.edu/fitness-wellness/students-employees" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><strong> There are four different membership types to choose from:</strong></a></p> <p>1. Adult: for a fee of $70 per semester. This membership only includes one adult student.</p> <p>2. Couple: for a fee of $85 per semester. The couple membership includes an adult student and an adult living in the same household.</p> <p>3. Family I: for a fee of $100 per semester. This membership includes a student plus a child younger than 18 years of age living in the same household.</p> <p>4. Family II: for a fee of $150 per semester. This membership includes an adult student, plus another adult, and a child under the age of 18 living in the same household.</p> <p>Some other YMCA discounts/ benefits include:<br /> • $100 joining fee waived for Estrella Mountain Community College students.</p> <p>• Reduced rates for child care/youth sports.</p> <p>• Membership valid at all 16 YMCA branches.</p> <p>• Must sign up at the Southwest Valley Family YMCA (2919 N. Litchfield Rd., Goodyear, AZ 623-935-5193)</p> <p>• Present photo ID and a copy of your current class schedule</p> <p>If you are a big coffee or tea drinker you may be interested to know that at the ECO Café in Mariposa Hall, you play less for a refill if you bring your own cup or tumbler!</p> <p>Lastly, if you bring your student ID to the movie theaters you get to buy your ticket at a discounted price.</p> <p>Being a college student gets you some extra advantages, so don’t be afraid to ask around, and save some money!</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/emcc-campus" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">EMCC Campus</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-engagement" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Engagement</a></div></div></div> Mon, 27 Apr 2015 21:37:38 +0000 MARDH70971 244 at Student Success Fair: A Fair Impact on Students /campus-life/volume-3-issue-1/student-success-fair-fair-impact-students <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Shea Huffman</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/campus-life" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Campus Life</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/campus-life/242-2015emccstudentsuccessfairphotocourtesyofemcc.jpg?itok=Mp6d0MEf"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/campus-life/242-2015emccstudentsuccessfairphotocourtesyofemcc.jpg?itok=Mp6d0MEf" width="480" height="320" alt="2015 Student Success Fair" title="The thrid annual Student Success Fair took place March 25-26, 2015" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-add-images field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/medium/public/robert_jenkins_at_emcc_ssf_photo_credit_shea_huffman.jpg?itok=_hmJxGOe" width="165" height="220" alt="Robert Jenkins" title="Robert Jenkins demonstrates CPR at the Student Success Fair" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>On March 25 and 26, 2015, during the spring semester, Estrella Mountain Community College held its third annual Student Success Fair, an open house fair that is free to students and the public. The fair was conceived in the hopes that it would promote student success here on campus and beyond, such as at a university or on the student’s career path. This was the third year that EMCC hosted the fair, and students raved that this was the best one yet. Not only was it entertaining and helpful to those students who needed it, but it also had a large impact on them as well.</p> <p>“There were a lot of people! There was music playing and all of the people at the booths really pushed to get people involved,” sophomore student Kaitlin Neises recalls the event. “They even stopped us to talk, and showed us all about the little stamp booklet-the ‘graduation passport’—and where you can go around to get stamps. They also showed us how to snag free popcorn and even possibly a free tee-shirt. All of the booths had a lot of information and the people running them were all very friendly.” However, the fair’s “bells and whistles” could not compare to what some students took from it.</p> <p>Robert Jenkins, also a sophomore at EMCC, says that he happened upon the fair by accident. He and his friends were just getting some coffee at the café when they bumped into the fair and had to stop to check it out: “One of the fire science professors came up to me and asked if I could demonstrate how to do CPR on an adult, because he knew I was CPR certified. I learned different ways on how to see if a patient is conscious or not breathing. I also learned a new way to check a patient’s pulse, which I thought was really cool.” But that was not what really set the fair apart for Jenkins. What really made the Student Success Fair stand out to him was the help they gave to him shortly after: “They told me that I had to take the EMT and fire-science course to get started with my career. They also mentioned that once I finished the EMT course, a faster way to becoming a firefighter would be to join the Goodyear Firefighter Cadet Program. They explained that if I did that, I should be able to be employed and pay for my schooling to becoming a paramedic firefighter. After talking to the fire science professors, I felt a lot more comfortable on what I want to do as a career, and I am very grateful that they were there to give me all of that advice.”</p> <p>This was not the only successful student encounter at the fair. EMCC Student Morgan Grant raved about the benefits of attending the Student Success Fair, and how it certainly fulfilled its mission to help students: “My experience at the Student Success Fair was great. I was pleasantly surprised that the fair had so much to offer to any passing student. I learned about things that were available that I previously didn’t even know existed. I felt like my success was cared about on a personal level from the minute I started talking with the people at the welcome table. It was more than just a fair. It was all about offering opportunities and help to many students that may not have been brave enough to ask.” All in all, the student success fair was-indeed-a success.</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-achievement" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Achievement</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/campus-event" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Campus Event</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-engagement" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Engagement</a></div></div></div> Mon, 27 Apr 2015 20:34:38 +0000 MARDH70971 242 at Social Work Month 'Paves the Way for Change' /focus-learning/volume-3-issue-1/social-work-month-paves-way-change <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Lindsey Minton</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/focus-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Focus on Learning</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/focus-learning/237-socialworkclub.png?itok=4OboJ5l6"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/focus-learning/237-socialworkclub.png?itok=4OboJ5l6" width="456" height="401" alt="EMCC&#039;s Social Work Club " title="March is Social Work Month" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>Social Work is <a href="http://www.socialworkers.org/pressroom/swmonth/2015/default.asp" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">celebrated </a>in the month of March. This gives social workers across the county the opportunity to bring attention and awareness to the profession and explain the important contributions social workers provide to the society as a whole.</p> <p>Many of you may wonder what exactly it is that a social worker does. According to socialworkers.org, “Social workers help people overcome some of life’s most difficult challenges: poverty, discrimination, abuse, addiction, physical illness, divorce, loss, unemployment, educational problems, disability, and mental illness. They help prevent crises and counsel individuals, families, and communities to cope more effectively with the stresses of everyday life.”</p> <p>According to Dalia Velazquez, a <a href="http://www.estrellamountain.edu/programs/social-work" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">social work</a> student at Estrella Mountain Community College said, “Social workers help people. There will be ups and down in your career, but it’s rewarding to know you give your time and effort to someone who really needed you.” For fellow EMCC student, Cynthia Gonzalez “Social work is about helping people work through bad times. It is one of the toughest jobs out there. But at the end of the day it is the most rewarding.”</p> <p>Here at EMCC, there is a Social Work Club. If you are interested in attending a meeting, the next meetings will be held on Thursday, March 26, and Thursday, April 2, 2015 from 2:00-3:00pm in Estrella Hall N247.</p> <p>During spring break 2015, members of the social work club will visit the Netherlands. While on their trip, the students will look at public institutions and services in the Netherlands compared to the United States. According to Amber Tomko, a member of the club the group will see “institutions, food banks, rehabilitation centers; 6 out of the 7 days we will be in Amsterdam where we are going to be touring a facility during the morning/afternoon. During 3 of the nights we will have cultural activities.”  She also shared, “When we return from the Netherlands the group and I will do a presentation here on campus to talk about our experience. We hope that we can encourage all of the Maricopa Community Colleges and even the state universities to do study abroad trips.”</p> <p>There will also be a Social Work Career Panel on Wednesday, April 22nd from 1:00-2:15pm in Estrella Conference Center C-121 North. During this event, professionals that work in the field of Social Work will present information to students and answer questions.</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-engagement" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Engagement</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/community" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">community</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-clubs-0" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Clubs</a></div></div></div> Wed, 11 Mar 2015 20:42:11 +0000 MARDH70971 237 at StoriEstrella /campus-life/volume-3-issue-1/storiestrella <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Katelyn Wiley</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/campus-life" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Campus Life</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/campus-life/208-storiestrella.jpg?itok=wnc4QbrY"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/campus-life/208-storiestrella.jpg?itok=wnc4QbrY" width="480" height="320" alt="Fine and Performing Arts Week" title="Fine and Performing Arts Week at EMCC" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>As part of Fine and Performing Arts Week, Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC) held “StoriEstrella”, a storytelling concert where past and current students where able to put their new skills to the test in front of their fellow students, family, and friends of all ages.</p> <p>One student who got to perform a story was Mariesa Rojas. Rojas told a story entitled “Angelita and the Giants,” which is like Snow White but is a Brazilian tale. One fun fact about her tale is that instead of a poisoned apple, there are poisoned slippers that cause the princess to fall into a deep sleep.</p> <p>To most people, performing in front of their peers is nerve racking, but Rojas says it wasn’t all that bad, “My mouth was dry and my hands were sweaty, but once I started it was easy.” Rojas also said she enjoyed the event and thought it went smoothly, “I was impressed. I would do it again.”</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/emcc-campus" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">EMCC Campus</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-engagement" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Engagement</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/cultural-celebration" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Cultural Celebration</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/art" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Art</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/educating-community" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Educating the Community</a></div></div></div> Fri, 07 Nov 2014 00:12:11 +0000 SELCB60601 208 at Social Workers Change Futures /editorials/volume-3-issue-1/social-workers-change-futures <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Ashley Osborne</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/editorial" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Editorials</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/editorials/206-socialworkii.jpg?itok=s8iFLunc"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/editorials/206-socialworkii.jpg?itok=s8iFLunc" width="480" height="359" alt="Social Work Program" title="Sociology Faculty Olga Tsoudis and Student Ashley Osborn Reaching Out to Students" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>When I decided to major in Social Work, I was already an established student at Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC). I found myself attending EMCC on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays while simultaneously attending Glendale Community College on Tuesdays and Thursdays for the required Social Work courses.</p> <p> After signing up for the E2 program, EMCC’s mentoring program, and meeting with my mentor, Sociology faculty, Dr. Olga Tsoudis, I decided to attend a Coffee Talk session and approach Dr. Ernie Lara, president of EMCC, about possibly starting a Social Work program at EMCC. He informed me that the courses were no longer offered because there did not seem to be a need for them. He agreed to consider offering the courses if I could provide proof that there are a number of students interested in Social Work.</p> <p> Fellow student Maria Moreno-Hasan assisted me in getting the word out and finding other students interested in Social Work. “Estrella Mountain is a welcoming campus that provides and equips students with what they need. That is why I attend this school, and why I wanted to be able to take the Social Work classes here” said Moreno-Hasan. With the help of professor Tsoudis, and several other faculty members and students, I was able to gather information on a number of students interested in Social Work.</p> <p> After a couple of months of reaching out to the students, I had a meeting with Dr. Pablo Landeros, Division Chair of Behavioral Sciences and Cultural Studies, Dr. Kathleen Iudicello, Interim Dean of Academic Affairs, Dr. Olga Tsoudis, Sociology Faculty, and Linda Cutright, Student Services Specialist: Academic Advisement and presented the information I had collected. Everyone agreed that there was a definite need for social workers in our community and a number of students interested in a Social Work major here at Estrella. As a result, this semester EMCC offers three different SWU classes.</p> <p> Social Work instructor, Stacy Moreno, said “Throughout this semester in Intro to Social Work, we explored just how broad social work really is as a field, the increasing number of job opportunities that are available, and the real impact we can have, positively, in the life of others; our families, our communities, our society, and in the world. Social workers think globally and act locally. Come explore with us and make change happen!”</p> <p> Starting this fall, EMCC offers the required Social Work courses that are needed to transfer to the Bachelor of Social Work program at Arizona State University.</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/carreers" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Carreers</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/cost-education" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Cost of Education</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/emcc-programs" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">EMCC Programs</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-engagement" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Engagement</a></div></div></div> Thu, 06 Nov 2014 21:42:28 +0000 SELCB60601 206 at Not Just a Man’s World Anymore /issues-higher-education/volume-3-issue-1/not-just-mans-world-anymore <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Shea Huffman</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/higher-education" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Issues in Higher Education</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/issues-higher-education/194-nursing.jpg?itok=zJPmFdoJ"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/issues-higher-education/194-nursing.jpg?itok=zJPmFdoJ" width="480" height="320" alt="nursing" title="Nursing is still a field that is predominantly female today." /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>“A woman is the full circle. Within her is the power to create, nurture and transform,” author Diane Mariechild once stated, and her words could not be truer. Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC) celebrated Women’s History Month on March, 2014 I decided to interview two women in two different fields, one in nursing and the other one in film editing.</p> <p> Each can offer a different career outlook on the equality of men and women.  One has a career that is mainly female-dominated, and the other is entering a predominantly male-dominated career. I wanted to interview both of them because they are in two fields I am considering, and because I knew they would have different opinions on the subject of gender equality.</p> <p> Margaret Varner is a registered nurse on a medical surgical unit at Scottsdale Memorial Hospital. I chose Varner as my expert source because she has already completed her education, and is currently in the midst of her first years as a nurse. The road to her career was not an easy one; she had to earn an associate’s degree, pass state board certifications called “NCLEX” and complete a standardized statewide test.</p> <p> According to Varner, women are treated the exact same as men when it comes to nursing. “It is a very respected and trusted profession, consisting predominantly of women, so women have really promoted nursing as a profession,” she stated, confirming my assumptions that the career was mainly carried out by women.</p> <p> Varner explained that one-in-seven nurses are women, making that around an 85 percent rate. “In nursing, there really is no gender gap [when it comes to pay],” says Varner, “it is equal for both men and women. It is not really about gender, but rather the work one does. You get paid according to supply and demand, experience and credentialing. The amount of effort you put in, whether male or female, will match the salary you are paid.”</p> <p> Nursing used to be a stereotyped career, where people would look at you strange or roll their eyes if you said you wanted to be a nurse. It was just a woman’s job and nothing more.  However, that has changed in the past years, as more men have decided to join the profession.</p> <p> Varner is adamant about how much she appreciates being able to this job every day. “Nurses can really affect people, and they can make a huge difference in how a patient’s prognosis turns out. I wouldn’t want to be anything else.”<br /> Cassidy Tilden is an 18-year-old student at Arizona State University (ASU), attending college to pursue a film degree. She is aiming to be a video editor for either movies or television. Her career field, compared to Varner’s, is male-dominated.</p> <p>Tilden quietly admitted, “I feel a little intimidated by it. The males in my industry make me feel inferior compared to them; behaving as if they are automatically better than me. The work has to speak for itself, because a lot of people underestimate a woman in this field.”</p> <p> Women also earn less than men do in film editing, which is a discouraging prospect when entering the field.</p> <p>Although many women are beginning to stand up and squeeze their way into the career, many others are too afraid of being pushed to the side simply because they are female.</p> <p>Tilden stated, “I wouldn’t say I’m confident. But I definitely will not let it discourage me from working in the industry that I have a passion for. I will have to work twice as hard, but that’s okay. It just prompts me to be the best I can be and constantly improve.”</p> <p>I found this to be extremely uplifting. It gives women a more positive outlook on being independent and doing what their heart pulls them towards, instead of shying away from it.</p> <p>Despite the disadvantages Tilden faces in her career, she refuses to give up on what she has always dreamed of becoming. Her parting words were particularly moving: “Constantly challenge yourself. Be unique. Everyone wants to be the next Quentin Tarantino. What makes you different? Revel in the differences. Expand yourself and always be creative, and never give up on your dreams.”</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-engagement" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Engagement</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-challenges" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Challenges</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/students" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Students</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/emcc-classes" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">EMCC Classes</a></div></div></div> Tue, 04 Nov 2014 22:20:03 +0000 MARDH70971 194 at Options for Women Writers /issues-higher-education/volume-3-issue-1/options-women-writers <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Kayt Ludi</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/higher-education" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Issues in Higher Education</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/issues-higher-education/193-writer.jpg?itok=nhioE6qv"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/issues-higher-education/193-writer.jpg?itok=nhioE6qv" width="480" height="324" alt="freelance writer" title="Women Freelance Writers, photo: S. Jones" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>We all write on a daily basis. Whether it is an email, a Tweet, a paper for school, or an article for a magazine, we all write, maybe now more than ever. So, how does one move from being a person who writes to being a writer?</p> <p> Writers come in a myriad of variations. There are freelance writers, novelists, journalists, screenwriters, playwrights, technical writers, poets, and more. Being an English major, I know I want to find a way to make a living by writing, but what are my best options? Will being a woman have an effect on those options? And what really are my chances of making my dream a reality?</p> <p> Melody Warnick is a freelance writer who has been published in O: The Oprah Magazine, Redbook, Reader’s Digest, and Woman’s Day, just to name some publications. </p> <p> In a personal interview, Warnick explained, “I'd always imagined myself as a writer and did all the normal writerly things, like spending four years on the high school newspaper, majoring in English at college, and reading a ton. But it wasn't until after my first baby was born that I started looking at magazines and realizing that, hey, those were freelancers doing most of the stories, not people on staff.”</p> <p> Valeria Flores, a sophomore at Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC) plans to become a journalist. She described journalism as “such a competitive field.”  As Flores explained it, “You have to know a lot of different things in order to be a good journalist.”</p> <p> Working.com backs up this statement by saying, “Both print and broadcast reporters need detailed knowledge of the geography, history, economy, politics, media law and social life of the communities and countries in which they work. For writing critical reviews and analyses, they also need specialized knowledge in a particular area such as art or politics.”<br /> So how does a person get a foot in the door?</p> <p> Warnick got her start by sending an idea to a small local magazine. They paid her $0.10 a word. “I got paid a whopping $200!” Warnick said.</p> <p> However, it was a start she could build on; pitching ideas to successively bigger and better publications. According to Warnick, “It took me less than a year until I'd gotten my first assignment for a national magazine.” Now Warnick makes between $45,000 and $50,000 per year (pre-taxes). “But I'm definitely part-time,” she added.</p> <p> Flores did an internship at EMCC’s student magazine, The Lion’s Perspective, to get some more experience. She said she occasionally does research about job availability in journalism. She added, “Honestly, I am concerned,” referring to future job prospects in her chosen field. According to a Forbes article published in April of 2012, “Journalist came in fifth on the worst jobs list”, but the same article also cited a Georgetown University study which said “The unemployment rate for recent [journalism] college grads was 7.7 percent, a half a point below the national rate of 8.2 percent.”</p> <p> Has being a woman affected Warnick’s career? “In good and bad ways,” she said. “On the upside, I've written a lot for parenting and women's magazines over the years; being the target demographic and a regular reader of those magazines helped me pitch stories they wanted to publish. However, the downside, Warnick continued, “is that I sometimes lack confidence to pitch publications that I see as more male-centric, like, say, GQ or Outside. There ends up being a bit of a women's magazine ghetto where female writers get stuck.”</p> <p> Flores said she thinks being a woman will probably affect her career somehow, but she said she thinks being Hispanic is something that will have an even bigger impact. “Because I'm bilingual, it's going to help a lot.” stated Flores. “Instead of paying two people to do one job, they can have just one person.”</p> <p> Warnick would advise college students who want to become writers to “Think broadly. I've stuck largely with very traditional magazine writing, and that's probably to my detriment. The most successful freelance writers I know have learned to find work in all kinds of places: writing web content for a local business, writing catalog copy, writing white papers or brochures, writing educational content, writing marketing or ad copy, writing blog posts or books or speeches.”<br /> Warnick continued, “One of the hardest parts about starting out is that everyone wants to see samples of your work, but you’re just starting out and you don't have those samples. It's frustrating.</p> <p> If I were a current college student, I'd get an internship at a newspaper or magazine or work on the college paper—anything that lets me write and rack up a few published samples of my writing. The other alternative: start a blog. I think editors are more willing than ever to look at blog posts as samples of how you write.”</p> <p> Whichever sort of writer I end up becoming, the key, it seems, is to let my writing become its own foot in the door. Whether it is through a job, an internship, a blog, or even papers I’ve written for a class, all of them can be considered samples. The consensus seems to be to create and select your best samples, and then use them to demonstrate what you can do. So that is what I plan to do.<br />  </p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-engagement" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Engagement</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-support" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Support</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/carreers" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Carreers</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/emcc-classes" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">EMCC Classes</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/emcc-programs" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">EMCC Programs</a></div></div></div> Tue, 04 Nov 2014 22:17:02 +0000 MARDH70971 193 at Sustainability at EMCC /campus-life/volume-3-issue-1/sustainability-emcc <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Tracy Molina and Valeria Flores</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/campus-life" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Campus Life</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/campus-life/191-recycle.jpg?itok=MkTfVE3I"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/campus-life/191-recycle.jpg?itok=MkTfVE3I" width="480" height="352" alt="recyling" title="Recyling Shoes During Earth Week, photo: S. Bockmiller " /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>At Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC), the sustainability team’s initiatives fall into two categories: president’s climate commitment to energy reduction, and sustainability tracking, assessment and rating analysis. The sustainability team frequently participates in student outreach and hosts educational events throughout the year.</p> <p>Recently, its efforts have been focused on planning Campus Sustainability Day, a nationwide event under the theme of “Empowering Change on Campus and in The Community.” The event allows students and staff to educate themselves about sustainable options they can implement into their everyday lives.</p> <p>It also participates in community events and projects, and partners with other community colleges to support the community. Collaboration with campus clubs and faculty helps amplify the efforts already being made by the team.</p> <p>The sustainability team works closely with EMCC’s student Environmental Club to reach as many students as possible. The team is composed of various faculty members that can serve as advocates for sustainability. Nadine Scowden, who helped organize the sustainability team on the EMCC campus in 2008, and who has been the chair person ever since, said, “The team is always looking to encourage more participation in campus-wide sustainable efforts.”</p> <p>On April 2014, for Earth Week, the sustainability team organized several events on campus that allowed students to learn about sustainability and animal habitats.</p> <p>A presentation about birds of prey focused on birds that can be found in Arizona and the work of the Liberty Wildlife organization. Liberty Wildlife is a sanctuary that offers a home to birds that have been hurt in the wild. Many of the problems the birds face are manmade, like birds being electrocuted when flying into wires or getting run over by cars.</p> <p>Once the birds are nursed back to health, they are set free. Liberty Wildlife takes in up to 4,000 injured animals a year. Sometimes, these animals are unable to return to the wild and instead are kept at the Liberty preserve.  These birds are then used for educational purposes, or become foster parents to other birds of the same species.</p> <p>Sara Wyckoff has been volunteering for Liberty Wildlife for three and a half years. She first heard of this program at Arizona State University.</p> <p>“If you don’t have a biology background, it is a great learning experience and it never hurts to find a volunteer job,” Wyckoff said.  She added, “You get to learn a lot about birds and how to train them.”</p> <p>For more information on Liberty Wildlife, please visit <a href="http://www.libertywildlife.org" rel="nofollow">www.libertywildlife.org</a>.<br /> To find out more about EMCC’s sustainability team or how to get involved, please visit: <a href="http://www.estrellamountain.edu/sustainability" rel="nofollow">http://www.estrellamountain.edu/sustainability</a></p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/sustainability" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Sustainability</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/active-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Active Learning</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/students" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Students</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/employees" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Employees</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-engagement" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Engagement</a></div></div></div> Tue, 04 Nov 2014 22:09:40 +0000 MARDH70971 191 at One Billion Rising at EMCC /campus-life/volume-3-issue-1/one-billion-rising-emcc <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Ernesto Oliva</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/campus-life" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Campus Life</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/campus-life/189-onebillionrisingcopy.jpg?itok=8R9ltfUi"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/campus-life/189-onebillionrisingcopy.jpg?itok=8R9ltfUi" width="480" height="320" alt="One Billion Rising" title="EMCC Students Dancing at the One Billion Rising Event" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>On February 2014, Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC) participated in the global “One Billion Rising” dance campaign to raise awareness and to end violence against women and young girls. </p> <p>The “One Billion Rising” campaign created a choreographed dance to “break the chain.” The purpose of the dance is for women to figuratively “break off the chain” their abuser has on them.</p> <p>Worldwide, violence against women happens often. One of the event coordinators, Dr. Sandy Zetlan stated, “One out of three women in the world are beaten or raped one time in their life.”</p> <p>The dance is all about a woman owning her space and not being scared to dance in public. Sociology professor, Dr. Olga Tsoudis led the dance for faculty and students as she demonstrated each new move that had its own meaning.</p> <p>During the event, various women took the stage and shared their story on how they survived the consistent abuse suffered earlier in their lives. Student Andrew Tran stated, “Being surrounded by all of these women who have survived being mistreated by men is inspiring. It’s also great that Estrella Mountain Community College is shining some light on this subject.”</p> <p>The outside courtyard of Estrella Hall was decorated with inspirational T-shirts that promoted encouragement with such phrases like “battered but not broken” and “break the silence.”</p> <p>Student Jemimah Garcia said, “I’m glad that I attend a college where these types of issues about women are important. It makes me feel like I am making a difference for others.”</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-engagement" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Engagement</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/educating-community" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Educating the Community</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/campus-event" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Campus Event</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/activism" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Activism</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/active-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Active Learning</a></div></div></div> Tue, 04 Nov 2014 22:04:01 +0000 MARDH70971 189 at PTK’s Advisor, Marylyn Bradley, Helps Students be Successful /profiles/volume-2-issue-2/ptks-advisor-marylyn-bradley-helps-students-be-successful <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Manuel Guerrero</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/profile" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Profiles</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/profiles/174-marylynbradley.jpg?itok=IxZNqqlk"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/profiles/174-marylynbradley.jpg?itok=IxZNqqlk" width="480" height="320" alt="PTK Advisor Marylyn Bradley" title="PTK Advisor Marylyn Bradley" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>Estrella Mountain Community College’s (EMCC) Phi Theta Kappa Chapter began 19 years ago and Marylyn Bradley has been leading EMCC’s students for more than half of that time.</p> <p>Bradley, the Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society Faculty Advisor at EMCC, took over at her current position as an advisor in 2004, while she was working as adjunct faculty.</p> <p>Bradley grew up in Illinois, earned a bachelor’s degree in Communications at the University of Illinois and a master's degree in Nutrition Science at Southern Illinois University. After moving to Arizona more than 30 years ago, she earned a master's degree in Health Services Administration from Arizona State University. </p> <p>Her professional career mostly consisted of working as a Registered Dietitian and in human resources in the healthcare field. She began teaching at EMCC in 2000. Shortly thereafter, she got involved in PTK, assisting with small projects for the organization.</p> <p>“My background has not really followed the typical straight line you would expect,” said Bradley, who is now a resource to more than 350 EMCC students who are PTK members. Bradley added that usually students go with one career path after college but that hasn’t been the case for her as she has gone from the healthcare field to teaching and now supporting more than 350 students with PTK.</p> <p>Although PTK is primarily student driven, as the faculty advisor, she ensures that EMCC’s PTK chapter achieves excellence in leadership, community service, and scholarship while remaining compliant with academics, PTK International and campus standards. She also attends meetings and helps organize the trips for state and national PTK meetings.</p> <p>One of the projects her PTK members are currently working on is a scholarship mentor program, which is geared to helping students find and successfully apply for scholarship opportunities. Currently the scholarship program, which began in October/November of 2013, is run as a pilot program for PTK members. Bradley hopes that, if successful in 2014, it can be considered as a possible campus wide program, making finding scholarships an easier process for students.</p> <p>“We trained five of our members who had already found success in winning scholarships and they showed the other students the ropes,” said Bradley. “Ideally, we can show our campus the value of scholarship peer mentoring in increasing completion rates. Finding needed financial resources is important to degree completion. This is an example of what PTK calls a College Project. It’s a gift we try to give back to the campus for sponsoring us. They support us with a lot and we, in turn, try to give back how we can.”</p> <p>The current campus Peer Mentoring Program began originally as the germ of an idea of a PTK student in 2008. Bradley said that the students saw that students could learn how to be successful college students by interacting directly with other successful students. Now, the program is a staple at EMCC.</p> <p>“I look on that as a PTK idea that was promoted by our students and ended up creating a real legacy for the campus,” said Bradley about the success of the program.</p> <p>According to Bradley, the students work on two major projects per year. Throughout the year, they also do community service work and look for ways they can positively improve the campus. Every second Saturday morning of each month PTK volunteers help clean the Goodyear Community Park, which began during the summer semester. They have also visited senior care facilities in Sun City during Thanksgiving to spend time with the residents there.</p> <p>Projects like this Scholarship Mentor Program have helped EMCC’s PTK Chapter to keep its Five Star rating since its inception in 1995. They have also been one of 50 PTK Chapters that have been recognized nationally for excellence twice under Bradley’s guidance.</p> <p>“Advisors and members connect outside the classroom and learn so much from leadership, service, and travel experiences,” said Bradley, who lights up every time she talks about the students who have contributed to EMCC’s PTK. “Working as a team with the students and seeing how they grow is what keeps me here.”</p> <p>Bradley’s sole focus is to help the students’ development as leaders. She says that all the ideas and projects are student driven and she enjoys seeing projects come “from a germ of an idea” to the final products.</p> <p>“This is a student driven organization. The students decide what they want to work on,” added Bradley. “At the end of the day, the students are the ones with the boots on the ground. They are the ones building projects from the ground up.”</p> <p>Bradley, who has taught nutrition, management, and leadership classes at EMCC, knows the value students get by being part of PTK. She gushes over their work and development from start to finish, never wanting to take credit for anything herself. But as she reaches her tenth anniversary, her track record speaks for itself.</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-achievement" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Achievement</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-clubs-0" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Clubs</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-engagement" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Engagement</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/honors" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Honors</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/employees" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Employees</a></div></div></div> Mon, 03 Mar 2014 20:35:48 +0000 ERIXL33951 174 at