Lions Perspective - Student Clubs /tags/student-clubs-0 en Social Work Month 'Paves the Way for Change' /focus-learning/volume-3-issue-1/social-work-month-paves-way-change <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Lindsey Minton</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/focus-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Focus on Learning</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/focus-learning/237-socialworkclub.png?itok=4OboJ5l6"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/focus-learning/237-socialworkclub.png?itok=4OboJ5l6" width="456" height="401" alt="EMCC&#039;s Social Work Club " title="March is Social Work Month" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>Social Work is <a href="http://www.socialworkers.org/pressroom/swmonth/2015/default.asp" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">celebrated </a>in the month of March. This gives social workers across the county the opportunity to bring attention and awareness to the profession and explain the important contributions social workers provide to the society as a whole.</p> <p>Many of you may wonder what exactly it is that a social worker does. According to socialworkers.org, “Social workers help people overcome some of life’s most difficult challenges: poverty, discrimination, abuse, addiction, physical illness, divorce, loss, unemployment, educational problems, disability, and mental illness. They help prevent crises and counsel individuals, families, and communities to cope more effectively with the stresses of everyday life.”</p> <p>According to Dalia Velazquez, a <a href="http://www.estrellamountain.edu/programs/social-work" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">social work</a> student at Estrella Mountain Community College said, “Social workers help people. There will be ups and down in your career, but it’s rewarding to know you give your time and effort to someone who really needed you.” For fellow EMCC student, Cynthia Gonzalez “Social work is about helping people work through bad times. It is one of the toughest jobs out there. But at the end of the day it is the most rewarding.”</p> <p>Here at EMCC, there is a Social Work Club. If you are interested in attending a meeting, the next meetings will be held on Thursday, March 26, and Thursday, April 2, 2015 from 2:00-3:00pm in Estrella Hall N247.</p> <p>During spring break 2015, members of the social work club will visit the Netherlands. While on their trip, the students will look at public institutions and services in the Netherlands compared to the United States. According to Amber Tomko, a member of the club the group will see “institutions, food banks, rehabilitation centers; 6 out of the 7 days we will be in Amsterdam where we are going to be touring a facility during the morning/afternoon. During 3 of the nights we will have cultural activities.”  She also shared, “When we return from the Netherlands the group and I will do a presentation here on campus to talk about our experience. We hope that we can encourage all of the Maricopa Community Colleges and even the state universities to do study abroad trips.”</p> <p>There will also be a Social Work Career Panel on Wednesday, April 22nd from 1:00-2:15pm in Estrella Conference Center C-121 North. During this event, professionals that work in the field of Social Work will present information to students and answer questions.</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-engagement" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Engagement</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/community" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">community</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-clubs-0" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Clubs</a></div></div></div> Wed, 11 Mar 2015 20:42:11 +0000 MARDH70971 237 at EMCC’s Sports Club /clubs-and-sports/volume-3-issue-1/emccs-sports-club <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Ryan Wright</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/clubs-and-sports" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Clubs and Sports</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/clubs-and-sports/202-basketball.jpg?itok=T1FlRNgy"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/clubs-and-sports/202-basketball.jpg?itok=T1FlRNgy" width="480" height="300" alt="EMCC Sports Club" title="Team Sports Vary Every Semester, photo: Q. Ledvina " /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>A common misconception about working out is that it is simply for looks. Exercise has far greater benefits than what meets the eye and Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC) is trying to get this message across loud and clear. Studies have shown that students who get involved in exercise actually tend to have better grades as a result.</p> <p>"What many students don't realize is that exercising can really help boost your life in all aspects such as school, health and even interpersonal relationships," said Lyle Bartelt, Manager of Fitness and Wellness at EMCC.</p> <p>There aren't many sports offered here at EMCC, but the college has developed a unique way of getting students active through friendly competition.</p> <p>During the fall 2014 semester, EMCC's Student Life coordinated intramural flag football as well as soccer. This semester the Sports Club has alternated to volleyball.</p> <p>Intramural sports are played every Friday form 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. The club meets every other Friday from 1pm to 3pm out on the field. It is open to all EMCC students and staff members and may run past the allotted time if participants insist.</p> <p>Bartelt oversees the club and believes it is a great way to combat inactivity amongst college students.</p> <p>“The American College of Sports and Medicine says that inactivity amongst all age groups is one of the leading causes of bad health, and among students inactivity is correlated with poorer academic performance," said Bartelt.</p> <p>The club encourages all students to get involved in gameplay and often games will go on for hours without keeping score. Students often compete for the pure fun of competition and no student is left out.</p> <p>"I really use the program as a means of blowing off some steam after a long day of classes, plus it is fun and I get to meet new people," said Divine Holmes, a student and participant in the intramural club.</p> <p>Even if you sign up with this club, there is no mandatory commitment. Students like Holmes can utilize the program whenever it fits their schedule. So if you are a student here at EMCC who might be struggling to turn that 87 percent in College Algebra into a 90, or want to boost your social life, or maybe simply want to improve your physical wellbeing, just put down your cellphone and pick up a ball on Fridays at 1 p.m.<br />  </p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-clubs-0" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Clubs</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/sports" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Sports</a></div></div></div> Thu, 06 Nov 2014 21:18:49 +0000 SELCB60601 202 at Honors Lecture on the New American Economy /beyond-campus/volume-3-issue-1/honors-lecture-new-american-economy <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Kayt Ludi</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/beyond-campus" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Beyond Campus</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/beyond-campus/195-kimberlylanning.jpg?itok=UBl7feRZ"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/beyond-campus/195-kimberlylanning.jpg?itok=UBl7feRZ" width="351" height="480" alt="K. Laning" title="Honors Forum Speaker Kimber Lanning" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>The theme for the Honors Forum Lecture Series for the 2013-14 academic year was “The Culture of Competition.” During the last lecture of the series, Kimber Lanning spoke about “Finding a Place in the New American Economy”. The lecture was hosted by Mesa Community College (MCC).</p> <p> According to Dr. Shari L. Olson, President of South Mountain Community College (SMCC), who introduced the speaker, Lanning is “an entrepreneur, arts advocate and community activist who works to cultivate strong, vibrant communities.”<br /> Lanning founded an organization in 2003 called “Local First Arizona”, a non-profit devoted to educating people about the economic and cultural benefits of locally owned businesses.</p> <p> Lanning grew up in Glendale in what she describes as an “artsy family.” She originally dropped out of college to open a record store, though she later went back to school. She followed this by opening Modified Arts in downtown Phoenix a gallery in what was then, according to her, a very rough neighborhood.</p> <p> She and a fellow gallery owner began the First Friday events that are now a large part of cultural life here in Phoenix, and turned the run-down neighborhood into an arts Mecca. She gives credit for this achievement to the “power of what small businesses can do when they work together.”</p> <p> The goal of Local First Arizona, and the main point of Lanning’s lecture, was to encourage people to spend their money locally whenever possible. As Lanning put it, “We’re voting with our dollars every day.”</p> <p> Local First Arizona runs several different programs, one of them being “Shift Arizona” – the goal of which is to have Arizonans shift just 10 percent of their spending to local businesses. According to Lanning, for every $100 spent in a local business $45 stays in the community. While the same $100 spent at big box stores only results in $13 for the local economy. And for every two jobs created by a big store coming into town, three local jobs are lost.</p> <p> Lanning explained that local governments provide major incentives to big businesses to open locations in their cities; believing that jobs will be created.</p> <p> According to Lanning, Cabela’s is the number one business in the nation for receiving subsidies from local governments, averaging $25 million per store. However, when its location in Glendale opened it actually received a total of $68 million in subsidies, including free land. Big businesses are even given something called “tax abatement” where they are allowed to pocket the sales tax they charge customers instead of it going to the community.</p> <p> But Lanning pointed out the discrepancy between what makes a good job versus a poor one, and warned that we are “going to end up with clerks and shareholders and not much in between” if our economy continues down the path we are currently on.</p> <p> She noted that Walmart is the largest employer in Arizona, and that most people shop there because they think the chain has the cheapest prices. But 83 percent of Walmart employees nationwide utilize their state’s Medicaid programs. Lanning said that if we factor in the cost of subsidizing healthcare for their employees (and health care is the number one expense for big businesses) through tax dollars, Walmart suddenly is not so cheap anymore.</p> <p> How hard is it to shop locally? Lanning said she is not asking people to only buy all their clothes from a tiny boutique downtown that is only open for two hours on Tuesday afternoons. But things like getting a local oil change, seeing a movie at Harkins, or shopping at Basha’s all count as small changes we can make to support locally owned businesses.</p> <p> And even when you do have to dash into Walmart, try buying your milk from Shamrock Farms instead of a non-Arizona based dairy. Little things add up and can make a big difference.</p> <p>For more information on Local First Arizona, please visit: <a href="http://www.localfirstaz.com" rel="nofollow">http://www.localfirstaz.com</a></p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/sustainability" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Sustainability</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/educating-community" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Educating the Community</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-clubs-0" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Clubs</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/honors" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Honors</a></div></div></div> Tue, 04 Nov 2014 22:26:14 +0000 MARDH70971 195 at PTK’s Advisor, Marylyn Bradley, Helps Students be Successful /profiles/volume-2-issue-2/ptks-advisor-marylyn-bradley-helps-students-be-successful <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Manuel Guerrero</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/profile" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Profiles</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/profiles/174-marylynbradley.jpg?itok=IxZNqqlk"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/profiles/174-marylynbradley.jpg?itok=IxZNqqlk" width="480" height="320" alt="PTK Advisor Marylyn Bradley" title="PTK Advisor Marylyn Bradley" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>Estrella Mountain Community College’s (EMCC) Phi Theta Kappa Chapter began 19 years ago and Marylyn Bradley has been leading EMCC’s students for more than half of that time.</p> <p>Bradley, the Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society Faculty Advisor at EMCC, took over at her current position as an advisor in 2004, while she was working as adjunct faculty.</p> <p>Bradley grew up in Illinois, earned a bachelor’s degree in Communications at the University of Illinois and a master's degree in Nutrition Science at Southern Illinois University. After moving to Arizona more than 30 years ago, she earned a master's degree in Health Services Administration from Arizona State University. </p> <p>Her professional career mostly consisted of working as a Registered Dietitian and in human resources in the healthcare field. She began teaching at EMCC in 2000. Shortly thereafter, she got involved in PTK, assisting with small projects for the organization.</p> <p>“My background has not really followed the typical straight line you would expect,” said Bradley, who is now a resource to more than 350 EMCC students who are PTK members. Bradley added that usually students go with one career path after college but that hasn’t been the case for her as she has gone from the healthcare field to teaching and now supporting more than 350 students with PTK.</p> <p>Although PTK is primarily student driven, as the faculty advisor, she ensures that EMCC’s PTK chapter achieves excellence in leadership, community service, and scholarship while remaining compliant with academics, PTK International and campus standards. She also attends meetings and helps organize the trips for state and national PTK meetings.</p> <p>One of the projects her PTK members are currently working on is a scholarship mentor program, which is geared to helping students find and successfully apply for scholarship opportunities. Currently the scholarship program, which began in October/November of 2013, is run as a pilot program for PTK members. Bradley hopes that, if successful in 2014, it can be considered as a possible campus wide program, making finding scholarships an easier process for students.</p> <p>“We trained five of our members who had already found success in winning scholarships and they showed the other students the ropes,” said Bradley. “Ideally, we can show our campus the value of scholarship peer mentoring in increasing completion rates. Finding needed financial resources is important to degree completion. This is an example of what PTK calls a College Project. It’s a gift we try to give back to the campus for sponsoring us. They support us with a lot and we, in turn, try to give back how we can.”</p> <p>The current campus Peer Mentoring Program began originally as the germ of an idea of a PTK student in 2008. Bradley said that the students saw that students could learn how to be successful college students by interacting directly with other successful students. Now, the program is a staple at EMCC.</p> <p>“I look on that as a PTK idea that was promoted by our students and ended up creating a real legacy for the campus,” said Bradley about the success of the program.</p> <p>According to Bradley, the students work on two major projects per year. Throughout the year, they also do community service work and look for ways they can positively improve the campus. Every second Saturday morning of each month PTK volunteers help clean the Goodyear Community Park, which began during the summer semester. They have also visited senior care facilities in Sun City during Thanksgiving to spend time with the residents there.</p> <p>Projects like this Scholarship Mentor Program have helped EMCC’s PTK Chapter to keep its Five Star rating since its inception in 1995. They have also been one of 50 PTK Chapters that have been recognized nationally for excellence twice under Bradley’s guidance.</p> <p>“Advisors and members connect outside the classroom and learn so much from leadership, service, and travel experiences,” said Bradley, who lights up every time she talks about the students who have contributed to EMCC’s PTK. “Working as a team with the students and seeing how they grow is what keeps me here.”</p> <p>Bradley’s sole focus is to help the students’ development as leaders. She says that all the ideas and projects are student driven and she enjoys seeing projects come “from a germ of an idea” to the final products.</p> <p>“This is a student driven organization. The students decide what they want to work on,” added Bradley. “At the end of the day, the students are the ones with the boots on the ground. They are the ones building projects from the ground up.”</p> <p>Bradley, who has taught nutrition, management, and leadership classes at EMCC, knows the value students get by being part of PTK. She gushes over their work and development from start to finish, never wanting to take credit for anything herself. But as she reaches her tenth anniversary, her track record speaks for itself.</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-achievement" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Achievement</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-clubs-0" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Clubs</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-engagement" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Engagement</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/honors" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Honors</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/employees" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Employees</a></div></div></div> Mon, 03 Mar 2014 20:35:48 +0000 ERIXL33951 174 at Teaching Educators What it Means to Care /clubs-and-sports/volume-2-issue-2/teaching-educators-what-it-means-care <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Eva Ziegler</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/clubs-and-sports" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Clubs and Sports</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/clubs-and-sports/158-teachersclub.jpg?itok=PFWxqUdH"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/clubs-and-sports/158-teachersclub.jpg?itok=PFWxqUdH" width="480" height="360" alt="Club members sharing teaching techniques." title="Club members sharing teaching techniques." /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>How many teachers have put on a film, or told students to open a book and read instead of working with them and encouraging them? While there are some inspirational, courageous teachers out there worthy of a Hilary Swank <em>Freedom Writers</em> title, there are not enough. </p> <p>According to Census.Gov there are 77 million children enrolled in the United States alone. This means 27 percent of our population's future and education depend on its teachers. However, student action has been taken to put quality back into teaching thanks to the Future Teachers of America Club (FTC).</p> <p>This club, which is at Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC), works to better future teachers and in turn create a brighter, bolder environment that features teachers who are passionate about their job, and bring excitement into classrooms. From their activities that bring students together, to the constant volunteer work, this club builds hope in both the teaching world and community. So what exactly is it that this club does and who can join?</p> <p>While the FTC is a club revolving around education, the members come from a variety of different backgrounds and majors. Alex Robertson, Officer At Large, said, “The club is not only for education majors, it is for anyone who wants to have an impact on the community.” The club has everything from nursing majors to engineering majors involved in the community work. Robertson said, “If you think about it, everyone uses teaching in their lives, whether they realize it or not. Anyone can benefit from FTC and that’s why anyone is welcome to join.”</p> <p>Besides the club's diverse background, the club's main focus is on harboring future inspirational teachers. The club is constantly holding activities that teach the members about inspirational teaching, such as its movie nights. As the movie mentioned before, the club plans on showing a screening of <em>Freedom Writers</em>.</p> <p>Growing up, the president of the club Nichole Soyka was inspired by movies like Matilda, a film about an intelligent little girl who learns how to control her telekinetic powers from her kind-hearted teacher Miss Honey. Miss Honey became Soykas shining beacon of hope. Soyka said, “We never want our club members to forget what it’s like to be a great teacher so we have screenings of movies that applaud phenomenal teachers.” These film viewings give an influential message to the members.</p> <p>Soyka said, “Everyone has heard those stories about inspirational teachers who changed everything, but few have actually had one. It’s sad to think that all teachers are not like that. It shouldn’t be rare, it should be common.”</p> <p>It is for this reason that this club also hosts discussions at its meetings where members talk about what it means to be a teacher. They talk about what else they could give to charity and the next step to changing the world as well. Robertson also hinted that members may receive some of his own fresh-baked cookies as a perk of attending the meetings.</p> <p>Outside of the meetings, one might be wondering what exactly some of the club's charity work is. One of these volunteer activities is running the Kid-Zone at the Oktoberfest in Mesa. A member of the club, Ian Rey Sausedo said, “I remember one of my favorite things we did was run the Kid-Zone. It felt good making the kids happy and getting to work with them one-on-one.”</p> <p>Sausedo is just one of the members who wants to be an elementary school teacher and is provided with practice by the volunteer work and outings that the club hosts. When Sausedo described the Oktoberfest in Mesa, images of green grass, face painting, the smell of fresh baked goods, and joyous faces of children were a part of it.</p> <p>Sausedo said, “It is events like these that keep bringing me back to the club.” The club hosts outings regularly, always giving the students a chance to practice interacting with the youth and complimenting the clubs motto that works to prepare future American teachers.</p> <p>The club, which takes pride in its volunteer work, also gives middle-school students a tour of the campus once a year. Little activities like this one go a long way in FTC. Nichole Soyka, FTC President, said, “It is all about the experience. It is not about what you get out of it, but what you give out of it.”</p> <p>When asked about more of the club's volunteer work, Soyka mentioned one activity in particular that was especially generous. She said, “Once a month, FTC goes out to a domestic abuse shelter and helps mentor the kids there. The kids are of all ages and we just help them out with whatever they need, whether it is life advice or just spending time with them.” FTC also holds a hygiene and food drive where they donate all the collected items and money to the shelter.</p> <p>Robertson also talked about his time at the domestic abuse shelter. He said, “I haven’t always been the best with younger kids, however working at the shelter has made me more comfortable. (Laughing) The kids ask the weirdest questions sometimes. I remember one time one of the kids asked me how to ask a girl out.” Just as Anne Frank said, “No one has ever become poor by giving.” This club certainly follows that quote.</p> <p>This club makes one wonder, why can not everyone be a Miss Honey? An individual might not be a Miss Honey to the world, but to one person they could be. According to Maci Hansen, a teacher at Lane Community College, “Teachers spend 1.5 billion annually of their own money on school supplies.” Imagine if the whole world practiced this kind of charity.</p> <p>Through FTC’s heartfelt charity, undying passion for the job, and wildly-fun events this club continues to inspire its members. So why not stop in for a meeting? One might walk in on an adventurous field day with the kids, or one might just sit down and read a quiet book with a child. Either way, a difference will be made in at least one child’s life. <br />  </p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-clubs-0" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Clubs</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/active-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Active Learning</a></div></div></div> Mon, 03 Mar 2014 19:14:06 +0000 ERIXL33951 158 at ISLO: A Pathway to Success /clubs-and-sports/volume-2-issue-2/islo-pathway-success <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Katelyn Wiley</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/clubs-and-sports" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Clubs and Sports</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/clubs-and-sports/157-islo.jpg?itok=9tRMb3Lt"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/clubs-and-sports/157-islo.jpg?itok=9tRMb3Lt" width="480" height="360" alt="ISLO" title="ISLO club members dressed for EMCC&#039;s International Festival." /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>As college students we all want to meet new people, get involved with the school, and have fun. The best way to do all three of these things at the same time would be to join a school club.</p> <p>Now when it comes to joining a school club you have to make sure you pick the perfect one for you.The sensible idea would be to choose a club related towards one’s passions and field of study, such as a theater major joining a drama club.</p> <p>This allows college students to work with what they love and build a better knowledge on the subject. Others join clubs simply to get involved and to have fun while on campus, like the Latin Dance Club. Finally, some join clubs to gain knowledge on a new topic or to help others.</p> <p>The International Student Leadership Organization, ISLO for short, is a club founded by Estella Mountain Community College (EMCC) students who had the urge to make a difference and it has been a successful club ever since.</p> <p>Makayla Sullivan, the communication officer for the ISLO Club says, “The International Student Leadership Organization is a club that volunteers at community and school events. It’s where we learn how to become leaders by helping out others.”</p> <p>As a member of the ISLO Club students not only participate in events planned out by the ISLO Club but also with clubs throughout the campus. The ISLO Club is there to help out other clubs and make sure events go well while also showing their support in the community by attending local events.</p> <p>Cindy Gilles, the president of the ISLO Club says, “The International Student Leadership Organization Club helps broaden cultural awareness and offers personal development and leadership skills.”</p> <p>“The international part of ISLO is that we invite everyone of every culture to join our club and have a place to be able to be themselves. We have a lot of people who came from other countries or even if our parents or ancestors came from another country.”  Sullivan explains why it is called International Students leadership organization.</p> <p>“The international part plays a huge role in ISLO. Half of our volunteer events that we volunteer at are at different cultural events. Like we volunteer at the Irish Cultural Festival, Russian Festival and just other international festivals and events.”</p> <p>In the month of November 2013 the ISLO Club has helped and participated in several events such as the International Festival where they showed students multicultural experiences from all over the world. During this event they planned for cultural arts, arts and crafts, live performances, study abroad program, and a fashion show for students to learn about different cultures.</p> <p>The ISLO Club also went to the Saint Mary’s Food Bank around Thanksgiving to help them with whatever they needed, knowing that the food bank would be extremely busy around such a holiday. With this major holiday taking place they were also participating in “No Turkey Left Behind” at the Sun City Health and Rehabilitation Center where they met new people and participated in actives to give back the community.</p> <p>An example of a past event that ISLO held to help the community was during the International Health Expo. “My favorite event I volunteered at was the International Heath Expo at Estrella. We taught students about how rice is a main staple for some countries and we just talked about all the different facts about rice,” stated Sullivan.</p> <p>However, ISLO is not only about giving back to the community, but becoming a leader, “My favorite activity we did was that we had a professor who taught at Estrella help us take a personality quiz and he explained what our results were and what our specific qualities and weaknesses are.”</p> <p>As you can tell by the list of activities above the ISLO club strives to help others which does not only give them a good feeling of knowing they help someone but the ISLO club has a lot of more benefits. Some benefits of joining the ISLO club would be volunteer hours, “You get to volunteer and put that on your resume. It looks very good, especially if you are applying for a leadership position,” said Makayla Sullivan.</p> <p>With the workforce becoming more difficult to join we need an extra boost for support and the ISLO club is a great way to achieve it. However, job resumes are not the only benefit of joining. The ISLO Club is a great club to place on college applications.</p> <p>The International Student Leadership Organization Club meets on Tuesdays afternoons from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. in the Plaza Gallery located next to the Career and Transfer Center. If helping out the community and your school while learning to better your understanding of different cultures sounds like an interesting activity to you, send an email to Cindy Gilles at <a href="mailto:cinlc04781@maricopa.edu" rel="nofollow">cinlc04781@maricopa.edu</a>.</p> <p>Once you do this she will simply ask for your information and begin to send you emails to let you know of events and meetings. “We are a very active group and there are no fees to join and no requirements,” says Gilles.<br />  </p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/activism" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Activism</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/cultural-celebration" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Cultural Celebration</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-clubs-0" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Clubs</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-engagement" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Engagement</a></div></div></div> Mon, 03 Mar 2014 19:11:32 +0000 ERIXL33951 157 at A Bright Future for PRIDE Club Members and the LGBTQ Community /clubs-and-sports/volume-2-issue-2/bright-future-pride-club-members-and-lgbtq-community <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Abby Landis</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/clubs-and-sports" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Clubs and Sports</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/clubs-and-sports/156-sandyzetlan.jpg?itok=ssU8_DR2"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/clubs-and-sports/156-sandyzetlan.jpg?itok=ssU8_DR2" width="239" height="283" alt="Pride Club Advisor Sandy Zetlan" title="Pride Club Advisor Sandy Zetlan" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>“I was bullied pretty bad in high school…I got a concussion from being slammed into a wall.”</p> <p>This is just one incident of unfortunate occurrences that plague adolescents who reveal themselves to be members of the LGBTQ community.  Happenings such as this one are frequent to those who choose to “come out”, as lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender.</p> <p>Schools such as Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC) have clubs to give common ground and support for those who identify as LGBTQ, such as the PRIDE Club. The term PRIDE is commonly used for many LGBTQ organizations.</p> <p>It is not an acronym; it stands for the pride the members feels for their own sexuality and who they are as individuals. Because of the sensitivity of the topics discussed in this article, all of the students interviewed chose to remain anonymous.</p> <p>PRIDE Club advisor and biology faculty Dr. Sonya Zetlan discusses the occurrences of bullying because of sexual orientation. She said, that “a lot of it is still clandestine.” Supporting this, a student in the PRIDE Club revealed that instances of cyberbullying are rapidly climbing because of the ease of access to social media. The student said there is “stuff that’s hard to prove and report.”</p> <p>Openly LGBTQ students would be an easy target if their first and last name were known. A few clicks of the mouse and all evidence of the bullying would be eradicated and the bullied student would be left with the emotional scars for years to come. Another student said that bullying occurs so often because “people aren’t used to any difference.”</p> <p>Zetlan said something similar, as she thought that “part of it is lack of education outside of their own community, and lack of awareness of positive aspects of diversity.” When asked if hatred toward the LGBTQ community had a correlation with this country being founded on Christian beliefs, she stated that “hate comes in all flavors—everyone is willing to be intolerant.”</p> <p>Zetlan said the EMCC PRIDE Club exists to “provide a supportive, politically active, educational, and socially fun environment for LGBTQ students.” Zetlan gave an insight to what types of events the PRIDE Club hosts on campus as well as happenings off campus. Zetlan said that because of the roots of the club, most of the events the PRIDE Club puts on are geared toward LGBTQ issues.</p> <p>PRIDE has a table during AIDS Awareness Month, and “during Women’s History Month we have a table for women’s issues,” Zetlan said. It also has a table for Coming Out Day on October 11th of every year. At their stations one would find information on the current issue and how it applies to the LGBTQ community.</p> <p>In addition to on-campus events, the PRIDE Club travels to downtown Phoenix to visit the art galleries. Zetlan said that “we sell buttons” to raise money for trips, and “we have our own button making machine”. Surprisingly, most of the PRIDE club’s money comes from donations. They received enough money two years ago to travel to Los Angeles. Zetlan also said that the EMCC campus, “is a very open campus to LGBTQ students and faculty. Because of that it is a very safe campus.”</p> <p>According to Parents, Families, and Friends of Lesbians and Gays, or PFLAG, a community of individuals working to promote safety and wellness in the LBGT community, “half of gay males experience a negative parental reaction when they come out and in 26 percent of those cases the youth was thrown out of the home”.</p> <p>A PRIDE club student member feared he would be one of those 26 percent, as he still has not told his family about his sexuality. He worries that he will be kicked out of the house and shunned from the family.</p> <p>According to CNN, on November 7th, 2013, Congress passed a law that would “protect gay, lesbian, and transgender employees from discrimination in the workplace”. The Employment Nondiscrimination Act, or ENDA, is one of many legislations that will empower the LGBTQ community, as times are changing and the social structure is constantly shifting.</p> <p>The New York Times reported that this is the first time in history both the Republicans and the Democrats have approved a nondiscrimination law that included transgender people. Zetlan was thrilled and encouraged at these new changes.</p> <p>Because students work while attending school, PRIDE club students discussed the new legislation. They said now if an issue arises, members of the LBGT community will be able to protect themselves in the workplace. It was often uncertain if employers would take the side of a LGBT employee. One student reported that the law “is going to make sure [the employers] have a liability to back you up.”</p> <p>The Republican Party had doubts about the bill. Republican Speaker John A. Boehner said that the bill will “cost American jobs.” He did not expand on this statement. PRIDE members are hopeful that ENDA will create a brighter future for the LGBTQ community.</p> <p>Gay marriage is a hot topic in this country as well. Zetlan touched on the subject, saying “there are interesting things” happening with marriage. She also said that “states are starting to come around.” According to procon.org, only 17 states have legalized same-sex marriage. Contrasting, 33 states have completely banned same-sex marriage. Given this new ENDA legislation, the LGBTQ community may see changes in the marriage department.</p> <p>EMCC’s PRIDE Club is just one example of the expanding acceptance that this country is experiencing. The club hopes that ENDA will pave the way to a more tolerant and liberal society.<br />  </p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-clubs-0" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Clubs</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/activism" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Activism</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-support" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Support</a></div></div></div> Mon, 03 Mar 2014 19:09:24 +0000 ERIXL33951 156 at EMCC Veteran’s Club Builds Bridge To Local Community: Launches Support for Homeless Veterans /clubs-and-sports/volume-2-issue-2/emcc-veterans-club-builds-bridge-local-community-launches-support <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Monica Garcia </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/clubs-and-sports" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Clubs and Sports</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/clubs-and-sports/155-veternsclubsellingbowls.jpg?itok=ZJLKXdhW"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/clubs-and-sports/155-veternsclubsellingbowls.jpg?itok=ZJLKXdhW" width="360" height="480" alt="Veterens" title="EMCC Veterens Club selling bowls to raise money and awareness." /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>You may be sitting at home while reading this article, but to the over 1,600 homeless veterans in Arizona, there is not a home to go back to.</p> <p>20 percent of homeless individuals in Arizona are veterans, according to USVetsInc.org., an issue that the Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC) Veteran’s Club takes to heart.</p> <p>The Veteran’s Club was signed into action at the beginning of October but has already started an initiative that will greatly help veterans in the community.</p> <p>“We hit the ground running, that’s for sure,” says Thomas Koch, President of the Veteran’s Club.</p> <p>Maryhelen Rosales, Co-Advisor of the Veteran’s Club and former Air Force veteran, came to the Veteran’s Club with a plan to help local veterans. Rosales had been searching for a way to give  back to the veteran community.</p> <p>The United States Veteran’s Initiative is a non-profit, statewide organization that provides assistance for military veterans and their families through housing, counseling, career development and support.</p> <p>The organization located in Phoenix started renovating an existing hotel in order to provide housing for veterans. These veterans are often homeless and have no other place to go.</p> <p>Money for the renovations are made with donations. $2,000 helps U.S. Veterans completely renovate a room, and any donations help provide materials for renovations.</p> <p>The Veteran’s Club jumped straight into planning in order to raise these funds. </p> <p>“Initially,” Rosales said, “when [the Veteran’s Club] was looking for officers they weren’t even looking for a treasurer because they didn’t want to raise any money for the club itself - but wanted to give back to the community.”</p> <p>Two major goals of the Veteran’s Club are to make other veteran students at EMCC aware of resources and how to utilize them, and secondly to give back to the veteran community. Inspired by Empty Bowl Events for World Food Day, Rosales thought, “Why can't we do something like that for veterans?”</p> <p>So the Veteran’s Club sprang into action. The plan was to decorate bowls and receive cash donations for them. The Veteran’s Club, however, didn’t have any funds to start off with. They reached out to the community and worked with local veteran organizations. They met with the President and Treasurer of the VFW Chapter #40 in Avondale, who donated $100 on the spot in order for the club to purchase bowls.</p> <p>With a bit of a laugh, Rosales commented, “And so we went to a few 99¢ stores and  just bought them out of plain white bowls!”</p> <p>Within that week, the club had everything prepared for the Paint-A-Bowl event. Held in the Plaza Gallery, the club allowed students and faculty to decorate their own bowls at no cost. “There was a ton of support from the instructors and students,” said Koch.</p> <p>Those who took part in the event were able to donate or pay for the bowls if they wanted to keep them. Rosales mentioned that “there were even students that gave whatever money they had out of their pocket just to donate to the cause.”</p> <p>The event raised around $1000, with donations even as high as $50.</p> <p>Other donations came in from the community as well.</p> <p>Adolfo Gámez, Mayor of Tolleson, worked with his organization  Hispanic Leader Forum del Oeste, Inc., and donated a $500 check. The owners of Avondale’s Auggie’s Sports Grill and Honey Baked Ham store also made donations to the cause. And Dysart High School’s Art Club reached out and donated more bowls to the Veteran’s Club.</p> <p>After the Paint a Bowl Event, the Veteran’s Club is currently only $500 short of its goal. During the whole project, Rosales and Koch agree that there was amazing support from the Avondale community.</p> <p>And despite only starting, the Veteran’s Club has built a network through this huge response, all willing and wanting to help the club next year, as Rosales says they will have a similar project to help the Veteran’s community.</p> <p>“What we want to do,” Koch says about the Veteran’s Club, “is to make sure that Vets are aware of what is available in the local community, to have resources available for their futures, and to help with job search, resume building —  just the basic transition from military life to civilian life. Because we all speak the same lingo.”</p> <p>On Veteran’s Day the club got together and went downtown to the Veteran’s Hospital and spent the day with the veterans staying there. “We spoke to a lot of them, pushed them to the parade that goes past the hospital.” Koch remembers it was a “pretty moving experience for all of us.” </p> <p>Not only has the Veteran’s Club followed its goals in making resources available for veteran students at EMCC and giving back to the veteran community, it has also built a community in the club and a sense of camaraderie.</p> <p>“The major thing is that we’ve all formed a special bond and we’re all friends,” Rosales says. “What’s nice is that everybody understands what the other person is talking about, like what Tom says —we speak the same lingo.”</p> <p>The Veteran’s Club meets every Friday at noon to eat lunch and “shoot the breeze” as both Rosales and Koch describe. “Members are from all branches of the military— and from all walks of life.”</p> <p>The Veteran’s Club is always looking for more veteran students to be involved with the community.</p> <p>For more information, please visit: <a href="http://www.estrellamountain.edu/students/veterans-services/emcc-veterans-club" rel="nofollow">http://www.estrellamountain.edu/students/veterans-services/emcc-veterans...</a></p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-clubs-0" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Clubs</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/activism" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Activism</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-support" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Support</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-engagement" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Engagement</a></div></div></div> Wed, 26 Feb 2014 20:39:51 +0000 ERIXL33951 155 at Catwalk on Campus /clubs-and-sports/volume-2-issue-2/catwalk-campus <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Chelsey Petersen </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/clubs-and-sports" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Clubs and Sports</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/clubs-and-sports/154-fashion3.jpg?itok=tEMm4Kch"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/clubs-and-sports/154-fashion3.jpg?itok=tEMm4Kch" width="480" height="360" alt="Fashion Show at EMCC" title="Fashion Show at EMCC" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>Fashion is something that has been a part of our culture for thousands of years. In the 1800s, it was petticoats and ball gowns; in the 1920s it was red lipstick and flapper dresses. Society is obsessed with looks, beauty, and the clothes people have on their backs.</p> <p>Some people go a bit too far (like wearing a dress made of meat), but if it gets the attention of anyone who matters in the fashion world, it is considered a score. Whatever is considered “fashionable” can take time to come into popularity, but it can also change drastically within the course of a few days.</p> <p>It is hard to keep up with what clothes are "in" and what clothes are “totally last year”, and a lot of people have given up trying to please society. However, fashion can have a deeper meaning to people than most would think. Designers are artists, and putting down the ideas of what is trendy or not can be as bad as telling Leonardo de Vinci that the “Mona Lisa” is not a masterpiece.</p> <p>Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC) has a club on campus dedicated solely to the concepts and ideas of fashion. The club's advisor, Beverly Garwood, had a lot to say about a club she has been advising for six years.</p> <p>Garwood came from Glendale Community College before starting her job as an advisor at EMCC. Since then, she has been in and out of the club as either advisor or president. During that time, the club has really focused on their fashion shows; one of their more recent shows being the Recycled Fashion Show. Garwood described working nearly a month on one piece for one of their shows.</p> <p>When not concentrating on putting together fabulous outfits for the performances, the club members also enjoy competing in challenges against each other that have to do with refining their fashion skills.</p> <p>One challenge that Garwood put together was the Goodwill Challenge. One of the club members, Anisia Valdez recalls, “We got magazines…and we picked an outfit that was already similar to what we had in our closet that was over twenty dollars. Then we went to Goodwill and tried to recreate the outfit for under twenty dollars!” Garwood explained, “It's teaching [girls] how to shop on a budget.”</p> <p>The club also tends to those who want to pursue a career in fashion. “Besides just having fun, we do things that are going to promote your portfolio,” said Garwood.</p> <p>Valdez agrees that the meetings are a lot of fun and very helpful. Valdez is always a model in the club's fashion shows, and she uses a lot of the pictures that are taken to use in her portfolio for the modeling agency she works with. “Being a model in training, I haven't done much. This [club] has really helped me learn a lot. Ever since I was little, I would watch  America’s Next Top  Model , and that's what I wanted to do. I don't just want to be a model for my whole career, but it's a passion I have.”</p> <p>Despite all of this knowledge and creativity to spread around, the club does have some setbacks. “I would probably say the most challenges that we have, being a fashion club on this campus, is the facilities,” said Garwood. “Since we don't have fashion classes, we don't have the classes; we don't have sewing machines; we don't have mannequins.”</p> <p>Garwood admits it is difficult to make the club professional and educational when they lack the resources that they need. However, Garwood believes that no one should be turned away from what they love just because they do not have all of the facilities they need. “Some people go „Why do you have a fashion club if you don't have fashion classes?‟ Because I have fashion students.”</p> <p>An even more recent show that Garwood worked on actually involved the International Club as well. The models of the Fashion Club dressed in clothes from other countries, a few of which were El Salvador and Brazil. Garwood believes that part of the unity of the Fashion Club is including other clubs and working together to create something great.</p> <p> Garwood and Valdez both agree that the club has been a great outlet for them and, also, a great teaching experience. “The thing is,” says Garwood. “Teaching these students, when you're working in the fashion industry, it's going to be those times where I want you to do crunch time, you're going to stay up overnight, you're going to have disappointments, you're going to have great things that you're going to be excited about. It's trying to educate them to know, besides us having a great time here on campus, there's the real world outside.”</p> <p>On the Estrella Mountain school website, under the fashion club title, it reads: “The purpose of the EMCC Fashion Club is to provide fellowship among the fashion enthusiast and to promote unity among the members.”</p> <p>But what exactly does that mean, and how does the club promote that? Garwood says that, “With unity, it's bringing in the different nationalities, ethnicities; we don't distinguish between whether you're male or female. It's opening doors for people to do whatever they want to do. I'm hoping that nobody, when we are doing our meetings, feels uncomfortable because your hair isn't done this way or you don't dress this way. Everybody's different.”</p> <p>Being fashionable does not mean you have to spend hundreds of dollars on a new outfit and it surely does not mean you have to be like everyone else. The club promotes that and teaches  people that everyone is different. So, is this a sign that the fashion industry should bring back  powdered wigs? </p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-clubs-0" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Clubs</a></div></div></div> Wed, 26 Feb 2014 20:35:10 +0000 ERIXL33951 154 at PTK’s Beta Alpha Xi Earns Honors in Action Hallmark Award /issues-higher-education/volume-2-issue-1/ptks-beta-alpha-xi-earns-honors-action-hallmark-award <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Lacey Holstein </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/higher-education" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Issues in Higher Education</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/issues-higher-education/134-ptk-project.jpg?itok=JLuag_tJ"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/issues-higher-education/134-ptk-project.jpg?itok=JLuag_tJ" width="480" height="360" alt="Overwhelmed and Tired Students Can Turn to Drugs" title="Overwhelmed and Tired Students Can Turn to Drugs" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>Last fall, Beta Alpha Xi’s, Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC) Phi Theta Kappa (PTK) Chapter, conducted research for a presentation that awarded the organization with the prestigious Honors in Action Hallmark Award.</p> <p>The project itself was centered on the PTK and MCCCD Honors Program’s theme, “Culture of Competition.”  PTK chapters nationally addressed the positive and negative impacts of competition in our daily lives, and Beta Alpha Xi chose to study how the pressure for academic success led to the rise of non-prescription drug use on college campuses to gain a competitive edge over peers.</p> <p>According to Beta Alpha Xi’s research, many students decide to take short cuts to succeed or simply become overwhelmed by the pressure to maintain a high GPA and excel in their classes. As a result, they often resort to self-medicating with stimulant drugs such as Adderall and Ritalin, thinking that they are both effective and safe. Research shows them to be neither, and quite high-risk.</p> <p>This prompted Beta Alpha Xi to pursue this topic for its Honors in Action (HIA) Project. To spread awareness on the dangers of these study drugs, the organization engaged in three full months of research to assemble an educational outreach program for students. This research weighed the pros and cons of the use of these prescription drugs.</p> <p>Marylyn Bradley, Chapter Advisor for the EMCC Chapter, described the process of managing the project, “This [process] took place through the summer and fall; it was a major undertaking.” It was a significant effort on the part of the chapter in terms of research, analysis, addressing of a community need, and reporting on project actions to the PTK Honors Society.</p> <p>The HIA Project educational outreach program concluded that the increased risk of addiction and altered brain development has resulted in a public health problem among college students.</p> <p>The efforts put into this project demonstrated scholarship, leadership, service, and fellowship- qualities that earned the EMCC Chapter with the Honors in Action Hallmark Award.</p> <p>Miguel Galarza, Communications Officer for the EMCC Chapter, said, “We were very successful. It was packed on the day of our presentation; we had 110 people, the largest audience ever for our chapter.” Overall, he regarded the chapter’s research and presentation as the best project of the year.</p> <p>The EMCC Chapter presented their findings on campus to Honors students, faculty, community members, and other student body guests.</p> <p>For more information on the EMCC Phi Theta Kappa Beta Alpha Xi Chapter and its work, go to the following links at: <a href="http://www.estrellamountain.edu/academics/phi-theta-kappa" rel="nofollow">http://www.estrellamountain.edu/academics/phi-theta-kappa</a> and <a href="http://www2.ptk.org/hallmarks/awards.htm" rel="nofollow">http://www2.ptk.org/hallmarks/awards.htm</a>.</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/cost-education" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Cost of Education</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-clubs-0" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Clubs</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-challenges" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Challenges</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/honors" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Honors</a></div></div></div> Mon, 23 Sep 2013 18:51:56 +0000 MAN2026125 134 at