Lions Perspective - Employees /tags/employees en EMCC’s Computer Commons /focus-learning/volume-3-issue-1/emccs-computer-commons <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"> By Karla Villarreal</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/focus-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Focus on Learning</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/focus-learning/200-computer.jpg?itok=tWQJ9698"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/focus-learning/200-computer.jpg?itok=tWQJ9698" width="480" height="341" alt="student working on computer" title="Student working in Computer Commons, photo: J. Henriquez " /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>College can be very overwhelming, especially when you have a busy schedule. Sometimes finding a quiet place to study or getting individual help can be very difficult. Many students in college experience stress, but Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC) has several resources designed to aid in student success.</p> <p>EMCC’s Computer Commons, remodeled in the spring of 2013, is one of these resources. This department includes computers, work areas, vending machines, and a scenic view of the campus through glass windows.<br /> Leeoni Long is a 19-year-old college student. She just finished her first year at EMCC and has always loved the assistance at the Commons. She also likes the calm environment. When she is in a hurry she feels it is a great spot to be.</p> <p>“The EMCC support staff is always helpful and makes you feel welcomed by offering one-on-one assistance. One thing that I enjoy here is that there are study rooms which we can reserve twice a week for two hours and actually spend time doing homework. Not to mention, the computers are always updated with the latest software,” said Long.</p> <p>Long feels that the Computer Commons is very helpful to people who cannot afford computers or cannot get fast access to the Internet. She also believes the fact that the Computer Commons staff offers help with computer courses makes it even better.</p> <p>Jerry Happ and Daniel Morales, are both computer lab technicians at the Computer Commons and have assisted students here for many years. Happ feels the Commons is a very useful resource. He said, “It is better than a public library because of the free help offered with class assignments.”</p> <p>“About 25 percent of the people who come to the Commons stay over an hour logged on to the computers working on school work. There are a total of 800 unique loggings each day. Not including the study rooms computers, there are 120 computers,” said Happ.</p> <p>Morales expressed that “Students are not numbers, they’re individuals. Real help is offered to students and they don’t just occupy a chair. A really cool thing that we offer is 11 study rooms with a two-hour time limit twice a week. You can fit up to about 7 people in the rooms and work on school-related assignments as a team,” said Morales.</p> <p>For more information, please go to http://<a href="http://www.estrellamountain.edu/students/computer-common" rel="nofollow">www.estrellamountain.edu/students/computer-common</a>s.<br />  </p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/emcc-campus" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">EMCC Campus</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/employees" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Employees</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-support" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Support</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/technology" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Technology</a></div></div></div> Tue, 04 Nov 2014 22:44:18 +0000 MARDH70971 200 at A Beautiful Campus /focus-learning/volume-3-issue-1/beautiful-campus <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Ernesto Oliva</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/focus-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Focus on Learning</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/focus-learning/198-landscaping.jpg?itok=JhnVqwsY"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/focus-learning/198-landscaping.jpg?itok=JhnVqwsY" width="480" height="360" alt="EMCC campus" title="Beautiful landscaping impacts students&#039; learning in positive ways." /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>Have you ever thought about how beautiful, positive, and sanitary Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC) is?</p> <p>If you have, then have you ever wondered who and how much work it takes to maintain a college so clean? But if you have not put much thought to this notion then please, let us take a moment to shine some light on the people who make it all happen.</p> <p>The custodians, grounds team, and maintenance team are responsible for why EMCC is such a clean environment. There is a lot of work that they do at EMCC that affects how students learn.</p> <p>Providing a clean and beautiful environment indirectly motivates students to want to attend EMCC and earn an education. Students like Karina Orabuena feel proud to attend a school like EMCC because of how well maintained the campus is.</p> <p>Seeing colorful flowers helps Orabuena because it puts her in a content mood. “One of the reasons why I enjoy attending EMCC is because of all the gorgeous flowers around the school. It brightens up my day a little and makes me happier to go to class,” said Orabuena.</p> <p>There are three teams that divide up the work. The custodians are primarily in charge of cleaning the inside of EMCC.</p> <p>The grounds team does all of the yard work on campus early in the morning. No one ever sees the grounds team because they do most their work from 5 a.m. until 7 a.m..</p> <p>Then there is the maintenance team who is in charge of fixing things like broken doors. Also, they are responsible for setting up for events that occur on campus.</p> <p>“It is really amazing how much work the teams put in. They never fail to amaze me,” said Courtney Bourgeous, the office coordinator for Facilities Management at EMCC.</p> <p>Kim Jordan, the maintenance supervisor for Facilities Management, speaks passionately about his job, co-workers, and EMCC. “I believe that a clean environment sets the tone for the campus,” said Jordan.</p> <p>The National School Boards Association found that a “positive school climate was the critical variable differentiating between schools with high and low rates of delinquency, behavioral disturbance, attendance, and academic attainment.”</p> <p>The appearance and atmosphere of a school is impactful. This fall the college won the Crescordia Award. It is a prize awarded by Arizona Forward, an organization that “brings business and civic leaders together to improve the environmental sustainability and economic vitality of the place we call home.”</p> <p>According to EMCC’s website, “The success of the landscape reveals that even with an extremely modest budget, if coupled with a critical understanding of microclimate, plants, materials and detail can create meaningful and engaging learning settings.”</p> <p>The grounds team, maintenance, and custodians help make all this happen without students ever realizing it. It is because of them that EMCC looks the way it does every single day.</p> <p>So if you walk around campus and happen to see a custodian or maintenance worker, then do not hesitate to give them a thank you.</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/emcc-campus" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">EMCC Campus</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/employees" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Employees</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/educating-community" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Educating the Community</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-achievement" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Achievement</a></div></div></div> Tue, 04 Nov 2014 22:37:20 +0000 MARDH70971 198 at Sustainability at EMCC /campus-life/volume-3-issue-1/sustainability-emcc <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Tracy Molina and Valeria Flores</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/campus-life" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Campus Life</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/campus-life/191-recycle.jpg?itok=MkTfVE3I"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/campus-life/191-recycle.jpg?itok=MkTfVE3I" width="480" height="352" alt="recyling" title="Recyling Shoes During Earth Week, photo: S. Bockmiller " /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>At Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC), the sustainability team’s initiatives fall into two categories: president’s climate commitment to energy reduction, and sustainability tracking, assessment and rating analysis. The sustainability team frequently participates in student outreach and hosts educational events throughout the year.</p> <p>Recently, its efforts have been focused on planning Campus Sustainability Day, a nationwide event under the theme of “Empowering Change on Campus and in The Community.” The event allows students and staff to educate themselves about sustainable options they can implement into their everyday lives.</p> <p>It also participates in community events and projects, and partners with other community colleges to support the community. Collaboration with campus clubs and faculty helps amplify the efforts already being made by the team.</p> <p>The sustainability team works closely with EMCC’s student Environmental Club to reach as many students as possible. The team is composed of various faculty members that can serve as advocates for sustainability. Nadine Scowden, who helped organize the sustainability team on the EMCC campus in 2008, and who has been the chair person ever since, said, “The team is always looking to encourage more participation in campus-wide sustainable efforts.”</p> <p>On April 2014, for Earth Week, the sustainability team organized several events on campus that allowed students to learn about sustainability and animal habitats.</p> <p>A presentation about birds of prey focused on birds that can be found in Arizona and the work of the Liberty Wildlife organization. Liberty Wildlife is a sanctuary that offers a home to birds that have been hurt in the wild. Many of the problems the birds face are manmade, like birds being electrocuted when flying into wires or getting run over by cars.</p> <p>Once the birds are nursed back to health, they are set free. Liberty Wildlife takes in up to 4,000 injured animals a year. Sometimes, these animals are unable to return to the wild and instead are kept at the Liberty preserve.  These birds are then used for educational purposes, or become foster parents to other birds of the same species.</p> <p>Sara Wyckoff has been volunteering for Liberty Wildlife for three and a half years. She first heard of this program at Arizona State University.</p> <p>“If you don’t have a biology background, it is a great learning experience and it never hurts to find a volunteer job,” Wyckoff said.  She added, “You get to learn a lot about birds and how to train them.”</p> <p>For more information on Liberty Wildlife, please visit <a href="http://www.libertywildlife.org" rel="nofollow">www.libertywildlife.org</a>.<br /> To find out more about EMCC’s sustainability team or how to get involved, please visit: <a href="http://www.estrellamountain.edu/sustainability" rel="nofollow">http://www.estrellamountain.edu/sustainability</a></p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/sustainability" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Sustainability</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/active-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Active Learning</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/students" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Students</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/employees" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Employees</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-engagement" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Engagement</a></div></div></div> Tue, 04 Nov 2014 22:09:40 +0000 MARDH70971 191 at Building Strong Communication Skills /focus-learning/volume-3-issue-1/building-strong-communication-skills <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Shea Huffman</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/focus-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Focus on Learning</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/focus-learning/188-patiositter.jpg?itok=EYn1OSs1"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/focus-learning/188-patiositter.jpg?itok=EYn1OSs1" width="480" height="373" alt="Valerie De La O" title="Communications Faculty Valerie De La O, photo: C. Chavez" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>Motivational teachers are the backbone to students’ success—they aid in paving the road for students’ career paths, and showing them the way when times get tough.</p> <p>All teachers have different styles of teaching - some are more visual teachers, while others prefer lectures. One teacher at Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC) has her own unique spin on teaching.</p> <p>Valerie De La O, a Communications professor, has her work cut out for her; she teaches interpersonal communication, public speaking, group communication and human communication. Many people have difficulty with these classes, since not everyone is an extroverted person. They may have trouble communicating with others, speaking in front of a crowd, or expressing their emotions in a healthy manner. De La O has dedicated her teaching career to helping students overcome these fears and helping them reach their full potential when it comes to communicating in the world.</p> <p>She takes a practical approach to teaching, basing it on application rather than strict lectures. From her own experiences in life, she has come to the conclusion that one retains more information from hands-on activities. She calls this her “method to the madness.”</p> <p>She said she is “constantly changing the mold to fit the students’ needs,” and likes to think outside the box, whether that be watching video clips on a certain subject or building a free-standing teepee out of raw noodles, string and a marshmallow to incorporate teamwork.</p> <p>De La O explained that she wants to build confidence and self-esteem in her students, so that they feel good about themselves to go out into the world and apply what they learned in her class. Job interviews, board meetings and public speeches are all examples of what she is preparing them for.</p> <p>According to De La O, the aspect of teaching that she enjoys the most is getting to meet everyone from different backgrounds, races, and even different points of view. She said that teaching is a learning experience, too—while the students learn from her, she in turn learns from them, and appreciates being able to have so many varying outlooks from different people. “It isn’t about the grade,” she stated, “It’s about leaving my class with the satisfaction of knowing you learned something new.”</p> <p>“She’s very energetic and passionate about her work,” one student in her Human Communications class, 18-year-old Dillion Burch, explained. Burch described how De La O is always lively and upbeat during class, and always tries to get everyone involved in the action.</p> <p>When asked if he would take another class taught by her, Burch agreed, saying she was an awesome teacher and saying he always enjoys class time when she is teaching. Burch is just one of the many students to praise De La O’s teaching methods and bubbly personality; but the amount of students she has excited about her classes is not surprising. “You can’t lead without followers,” said De La O, “We must all work together to accomplish something amazing.”<br />  </p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-achievement" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Achievement</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/emcc-classes" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">EMCC Classes</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/active-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Active Learning</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/employees" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Employees</a></div></div></div> Tue, 04 Nov 2014 22:00:17 +0000 MARDH70971 188 at Loving to Help Others /profiles/volume-2-issue-2/loving-help-others <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Regina Gonzalez </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/profile" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Profiles</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/profiles/175-seantingle.jpg?itok=T04iGGPS"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/profiles/175-seantingle.jpg?itok=T04iGGPS" width="480" height="320" alt="Writing Center Tutor Sean Tingle" title="Writing Center Tutor Sean Tingle" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>It can be easy to feel intimidated by the idea of seeking out tutoring, but students should not feel that way. Sean Tingle is a tutor at the Writing Center in Estrella Hall at Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC). Tingle has a lot of patience with his students.</p> <p>Tingle grew up in an inconsistent home; he would move to different states since the age of one.  His father was in the Air Force and his family moved constantly. He lived in California, Texas, Washington, D.C., Mississippi and finally Arizona by the age of 13. He resided in Glendale, Ariz. until the age of 17 and graduated from Mountain Ridge High School.</p> <p>He attended Glendale Community College (GCC) while still in high school and then transferred his credits to Northern Arizona University. There he received a bachelor's degree in Humanities and later a master's degree in English. </p> <p>He found his passion for helping others when he was attending GCC.</p> <p>When Tingle was a baby, his father would carry him around, point to things all over, tell him what they were called, and explain what they were. This sparked a lifelong desire to learn and help others.</p> <p>Tingle's parents would help him a lot and it lead him to helping others. He would help his little brother and cousins with schoolwork.  He also worked at Paradise Education Center where he helped students after school.  Tingle said, “Working with the children at Paradise Education Center was a wonderful and rewarding experience.”</p> <p>Tingle taught English in Japan during the 2012/13 school year. As a result of his journey to Japan he learned the Japanese language. He taught at EMCC for one year before leaving to Japan, and then returned to EMCC the day after coming home. He loved his experience there, but he was excited to return to EMCC.</p> <p>His passion for helping others grew because he thinks learning is very important.  Tingle said, “All students are capable of success. I want to help them achieve their goals”.  In the future he wants to continue teaching and helping students. He hopes to eventually earn a doctorate degree.</p> <p>He is now a tutor and professor at EMCC. Many students call him “Mr. Sean”. He teaches English 081, 091 and 101. He recently received an award from EMCC’s Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society for being an exceptional mentor.</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/learning-styles" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Learning Styles</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-achievement" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Achievement</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-challenges" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Challenges</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-support" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Support</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/employees" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Employees</a></div></div></div> Mon, 03 Mar 2014 20:37:55 +0000 ERIXL33951 175 at PTK’s Advisor, Marylyn Bradley, Helps Students be Successful /profiles/volume-2-issue-2/ptks-advisor-marylyn-bradley-helps-students-be-successful <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Manuel Guerrero</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/profile" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Profiles</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/profiles/174-marylynbradley.jpg?itok=IxZNqqlk"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/profiles/174-marylynbradley.jpg?itok=IxZNqqlk" width="480" height="320" alt="PTK Advisor Marylyn Bradley" title="PTK Advisor Marylyn Bradley" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>Estrella Mountain Community College’s (EMCC) Phi Theta Kappa Chapter began 19 years ago and Marylyn Bradley has been leading EMCC’s students for more than half of that time.</p> <p>Bradley, the Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society Faculty Advisor at EMCC, took over at her current position as an advisor in 2004, while she was working as adjunct faculty.</p> <p>Bradley grew up in Illinois, earned a bachelor’s degree in Communications at the University of Illinois and a master's degree in Nutrition Science at Southern Illinois University. After moving to Arizona more than 30 years ago, she earned a master's degree in Health Services Administration from Arizona State University. </p> <p>Her professional career mostly consisted of working as a Registered Dietitian and in human resources in the healthcare field. She began teaching at EMCC in 2000. Shortly thereafter, she got involved in PTK, assisting with small projects for the organization.</p> <p>“My background has not really followed the typical straight line you would expect,” said Bradley, who is now a resource to more than 350 EMCC students who are PTK members. Bradley added that usually students go with one career path after college but that hasn’t been the case for her as she has gone from the healthcare field to teaching and now supporting more than 350 students with PTK.</p> <p>Although PTK is primarily student driven, as the faculty advisor, she ensures that EMCC’s PTK chapter achieves excellence in leadership, community service, and scholarship while remaining compliant with academics, PTK International and campus standards. She also attends meetings and helps organize the trips for state and national PTK meetings.</p> <p>One of the projects her PTK members are currently working on is a scholarship mentor program, which is geared to helping students find and successfully apply for scholarship opportunities. Currently the scholarship program, which began in October/November of 2013, is run as a pilot program for PTK members. Bradley hopes that, if successful in 2014, it can be considered as a possible campus wide program, making finding scholarships an easier process for students.</p> <p>“We trained five of our members who had already found success in winning scholarships and they showed the other students the ropes,” said Bradley. “Ideally, we can show our campus the value of scholarship peer mentoring in increasing completion rates. Finding needed financial resources is important to degree completion. This is an example of what PTK calls a College Project. It’s a gift we try to give back to the campus for sponsoring us. They support us with a lot and we, in turn, try to give back how we can.”</p> <p>The current campus Peer Mentoring Program began originally as the germ of an idea of a PTK student in 2008. Bradley said that the students saw that students could learn how to be successful college students by interacting directly with other successful students. Now, the program is a staple at EMCC.</p> <p>“I look on that as a PTK idea that was promoted by our students and ended up creating a real legacy for the campus,” said Bradley about the success of the program.</p> <p>According to Bradley, the students work on two major projects per year. Throughout the year, they also do community service work and look for ways they can positively improve the campus. Every second Saturday morning of each month PTK volunteers help clean the Goodyear Community Park, which began during the summer semester. They have also visited senior care facilities in Sun City during Thanksgiving to spend time with the residents there.</p> <p>Projects like this Scholarship Mentor Program have helped EMCC’s PTK Chapter to keep its Five Star rating since its inception in 1995. They have also been one of 50 PTK Chapters that have been recognized nationally for excellence twice under Bradley’s guidance.</p> <p>“Advisors and members connect outside the classroom and learn so much from leadership, service, and travel experiences,” said Bradley, who lights up every time she talks about the students who have contributed to EMCC’s PTK. “Working as a team with the students and seeing how they grow is what keeps me here.”</p> <p>Bradley’s sole focus is to help the students’ development as leaders. She says that all the ideas and projects are student driven and she enjoys seeing projects come “from a germ of an idea” to the final products.</p> <p>“This is a student driven organization. The students decide what they want to work on,” added Bradley. “At the end of the day, the students are the ones with the boots on the ground. They are the ones building projects from the ground up.”</p> <p>Bradley, who has taught nutrition, management, and leadership classes at EMCC, knows the value students get by being part of PTK. She gushes over their work and development from start to finish, never wanting to take credit for anything herself. But as she reaches her tenth anniversary, her track record speaks for itself.</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-achievement" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Achievement</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-clubs-0" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Clubs</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-engagement" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Engagement</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/honors" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Honors</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/employees" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Employees</a></div></div></div> Mon, 03 Mar 2014 20:35:48 +0000 ERIXL33951 174 at Frank Hernandez: A Living Legend /profiles/volume-2-issue-2/frank-hernandez-living-legend <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Kayt Ludi</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/profile" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Profiles</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/profiles/173-frankhernandez.jpg?itok=7fmLE-3Y"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/profiles/173-frankhernandez.jpg?itok=7fmLE-3Y" width="480" height="271" alt="Political Science Instructor Frank Hernandez" title="Political Science Instructor Frank Hernandez" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>Frank Hernandez was born in Saginaw, Michigan during the 1930s. He experienced racism and discrimination first hand throughout his youth and young adulthood. He served in the US Air Force during the Korean War. He has attended, and taught at prestigious universities.</p> <p>Outside of teaching, he has also worked for the government in many different capacities over the years. He is a husband, father of three, and grandfather of two. And all of these things inform and enhance his teaching of Political Science at EMCC.</p> <p>Hernandez grew up and lived in what he describes as having been a fairly ethnically diverse community in Saginaw. During the '40s, however, the level of violence increased. Stabbings, shootings, drugs, prostitution were all on the rise. Police brutality was also rampant. According to Hernandez, “The police would stop us, and by us I mean Blacks and Latinos, for no reason at all. They would demand ID. They would throw us against the car, search us, and if you protested, they would take out the night stick and beat you up.”</p> <p>In trying to move out of the increasingly dangerous neighborhood in the '50s, Hernandez encountered what he describes as “severe discrimination.” He and his wife wanted to move their family to the safer environment of the West Side of Saginaw, but found that they were not entirely welcome. “Realtors would tell us that the house we were interested in was just sold when I gave them my last name.” Hernandez said.</p> <p>Some realtors were openly racist, telling Hernandez, “We don’t want any Mexicans on the West Side.” Fortunately, a friend with whom Hernandez was discussing his difficulties, invited Hernandez to come to church with him one Sunday. At the church the friend introduced Hernandez to one of his fellow parishioners – an Irish-Catholic realtor who knew a bit about discrimination himself. The Hernandez family moved to the West Side.</p> <p>Before he was married, Hernandez was briefly in the US Air Force during the '50s. He was stationed in Montgomery, Alabama just one year before Rosa Parks made history by refusing to give up her bus seat for a white passenger. When Hernandez, and a fellow Airman (an African-American from Detroit) attempted to ride a bus in Montgomery one day, the driver looked them both over and told Hernandez’s friend to go to the back of the bus. The friend protested that since he was in the military he shouldn’t have to go to the back of the bus, but the driver was unmoved. Hernandez suggested they get off the bus since, as he said to his friend, “We’re not in Detroit.”</p> <p>Out of the military, Hernandez went back to Michigan and attended Central Michigan University on the GI Bill. He received his bachelor's degree in Clinical Psychology. He worked as a substitute teacher at “a very tough” junior high school, then for the juvenile court system for about three years. Eventually he worked for the City of Saginaw as an adult probation officer and an assistant to the city manager. He was the Director of the City of Saginaw’s Work Relief program, and the city’s welfare budget – which his boss, the city manager, always sent Hernandez to explain/defend in front of the city council.</p> <p>The Hernandez family then decided to leave Michigan for the better weather of California. They moved 25 miles outside San Francisco, where Hernandez found work in adult probation, juvenile probation, and family court services. He also attended San Francisco State University where he earned a master's degree in Education. Hernandez got a second master's degree in Public Administration from USC. At USC he also did everything, but his dissertation for his doctorate focused on the area of Family Court Services – which included a research project about reducing the negative impact of divorce on children. He developed what was called the Child Custody Supervision Program, which created a corps of people able to respond to any and all child custody issues 24 hours a day. The program became the model for counties across Northern California.</p> <p>After retiring from working in government, Hernandez taught for about eight years in the Political Science Department at San Jose State, as well as in their MA in Public Administration Program. After that he taught about a year at San Francisco State in the Public Administration Department. Hernandez then moved to Arizona. He worked as a school counselor for the city of Tempe, and then taught Political Science for MCCCD campuses at Glendale, Paradise Valley and Estrella. He is in his 4th year now at EMCC.</p> <p>Andrea Beltran, who is currently taking POS110: American National Government from Hernandez, said, “I would definitely recommend Mr. Hernandez class.”  According to Beltran, “It is certainly an eye opener. How he goes about teaching us is something new to me. He uses the Socratic method of questioning, whether he notices this or not, I’m not sure, but it is very effective. He lets you draw your own conclusions.”</p> <p>Beltran, who is majoring in Journalism and Political Science, has long been very interested in politics. Though politics could be considered a very touchy subject, Beltran said that in the class, “Views, of course, do differ, but there is never real hostility, and everyone respects different views.” And when it comes down to whether or not Beltran feels that Hernandez’s life experiences add to his ability to teach Political Science effectively, Beltran said, “They really do. His experiences make up a lot of his lectures, and when he’s done questioning us and making us draw our own conclusions, he complements them with his own life experiences and stories that enrich his lessons like no other.”</p> <p>Hernandez is currently writing a book, which he hopes will be finished next year. The subject of the book will be the world economy, and it will be largely based on a paper he presented at an international conference in Mexico City in the '90s. During the current spring semester, Hernandez is teaching both POS 110 and 115 at EMCC.</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/employees" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Employees</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/emcc-classes" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">EMCC Classes</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/ethnicity" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Ethnicity</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/politics" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Politics</a></div></div></div> Mon, 03 Mar 2014 20:32:08 +0000 ERIXL33951 173 at HES100: Encouraging People to Care /focus-learning/volume-2-issue-2/hes100-encouraging-people-care <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Kaity Ford</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/focus-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Focus on Learning</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/focus-learning/170-annannhongii.jpg?itok=B_DWXiU1"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/focus-learning/170-annannhongii.jpg?itok=B_DWXiU1" width="480" height="320" alt="HES100 Instructor Annann Hong" title="HES100 Instructor Annann Hong" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>According to the Center for Disease Control, "Health is more than the absence of disease; it is a resource that allows people to realize their aspirations, satisfy their needs and to cope with the environment in order to live a long, productive, and fruitful life. In this sense, health enables social, economic and personal development fundamental to well-being."</p> <p>Well-being is a crucial part of our lives and in an effort to recognize the importance of student health, Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC) offers a course called Healthful Living 100.</p> <p>The EMCC class schedule describes Healthful Living 100 (HES100) as a class that explores current topics of interest such as stress management, fitness, alcohol and drug abuse, and relationships, and evaluates the risks associated with the modern lifestyle.</p> <p>Taught by Annann Hong, Ph.D., HES100 fulfills the General Education Requirement for Social and Behavioral Sciences and is used to satisfy various health related degrees at Arizona State University, Northern Arizona University, as well as the Personal Trainer Certificate offered at various Maricopa Community College campuses.</p> <p>HES100 is thoughtfully orchestrated around the eight dimensions of wellness. Represented as a wagon wheel, each dimension of wellness is a part of the whole, intertwining to create overall well-being. The eight factors that represent each wheel spoke are: physical, emotional, social, environmental, sexual, spiritual, occupational, and intellectual wellness.</p> <p>Expect to learn about nutrition and why a healthy diet is important. Hong likes to use peanut butter as a prime example, "Take peanut butter- a natural, healthy whole food. Somehow the norm has become Jiffy and Skippy; hydrogenated, processed, lacking nutrition. What happened?!"</p> <p>Among other things covered in the course are guidelines for healthy ways to fight diseases prevalent in our society today, how to protect yourself from sexually transmitted diseases, and how to squeeze in physical activity where least expected, like lunges while brushing one’s teeth.</p> <p>Although the district creates basic guidelines for the necessary material that needs to be covered in the course, Hong often goes beyond the minimum and tries to bring forth new ideas and staggering facts to her students.</p> <p>"One of the great things about being a professor here at Estrella is there's academic freedom; there are really no limits. I think what motivates me to cover the things I cover in class stems from my firsthand experiences as a health educator and the experiences of my students," she said. With each class Dr. Hong logs new stories from her students, learning about what students are facing today and passing along the knowledge to future classes.</p> <p>To make the course more personal, SMART Goals are created by each student at the beginning of the semester and worked on throughout. SMART (specific, measureable, attainable, relevant, time-bound) is the criteria which help guide in the setting of objectives. The point of SMART Goals is to help the student learn how to set attainable goals, create a plan to fulfill them, and evaluate ones progress and make changes where needed.</p> <p>Whether the goal is to walk for 30 minutes five times a week or stop drinking soda or even stick to building ones savings account, the project provides a strong guide for creating goals and proves the students capabilities.</p> <p>Speaking of goals, Hong has a few goals in mind for HES100. "Now that I have been here a while, one of the things I am hoping to do, that I would love to do, is build a curriculum around HES100. The problem right now is that HES100 sort of sits in a vacuum by itself. It meets the social behavioral requirements if you plan to transfer, but it doesn't really reside in the context of a program specifically within Estrella,” she said.</p> <p>Hong hopes to create an associate's or certificate program that would springboard off of HES100 and continue into the health education field, and would also like to see HES100 incorporated into other EMCC offerings, such as the healthcare programs through the SouthWest Skill Center.</p> <p>In general she would like to see health education grow on campus, with students becoming more health conscious and spreading the word. “There is something about the traditional college environment that breeds higher risk for health concerns and it has been a really interesting population to work with.”</p> <p>College students certainly do have a knack for honing unhealthy habits, considering their limited time and resources. But in the same light, they could hone healthy habits just as well, and this is where HES100 lends itself.</p> <p>Aside from the practical information provided in the course, there is something to be said for Hong’s unique teaching style that really sets this class apart from others. “She is so passionate about teaching; she goes into rants because she gets so excited. It’s funny,” said Briana De La Rosa, a student in Hong’s class.</p> <p>Hong’s spirit fills the room during class discussions, her passion so fiery she might burst, or pass out from not taking a breath. Not only is she entertaining, but her energy ignites a tiny flame within the student, infecting them with inspiration and awareness.</p> <p>“Just at a basic level, I don’t necessarily feel like students have to remember every little nugget of factual information that I pass on to them, but I think bringing awareness to the idea of personal health decisions having far wider reaching effects than we often consider, I think conceptually it can help each of us make different choices when we think about upping our accountability to each other, being a role model for other people, or being more observant of what others are going through. Really encouraging positive social health; encouraging people to care,” said Hong.</p> <p>De La Rosa says this class is helpful because “it makes you more aware of your body and you learn about yourself and how to build relationships.” She also said she would definitely recommend the class to other students because the environment allows you to freely express yourself and your ideas, which makes the class enjoyable rather than dreadful.</p> <p>Whether or not students are pursuing a health-related career field or just want to be healthier in their personal lives, HES100 offers something for everyone.</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/emcc-classes" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">EMCC Classes</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/employees" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Employees</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/healthy-living" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Healthy Living</a></div></div></div> Mon, 03 Mar 2014 20:17:59 +0000 ERIXL33951 170 at Lifelong Learning: The Key to Happiness /focus-learning/volume-2-issue-2/lifelong-learning-key-happiness <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Antonica Hernandez </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/focus-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Focus on Learning</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/focus-learning/167-johnfrasure.jpg?itok=Uc2ePpzn"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/focus-learning/167-johnfrasure.jpg?itok=Uc2ePpzn" width="480" height="320" alt="History Instructor John Frasure (right)" title="History Instructor John Frasure (right)" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>History classes are stereotyped to be boring and sometimes the teacher is as well; unless of course, you enroll in a history class with John Frasure at Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC).</p> <p>Passionate about history, Frasure’s excitement about obtaining knowledge is contagious.</p> <p>While most are still unsure of the career they want to pursue even as adults, Frasure claims he has known that he wanted to be a teacher ever since he can remember. Even as a young child in elementary school in Garrett, Kentucky, it interested him to learn about past history.</p> <p>He found it even more fascinating that history is a topic that you can always learn more about. Frasure views it as something that is constantly changing, and believes history that is in the making is merely something to learn from, so that the same mistakes are not continuously repeated.</p> <p>After high school, Frasure went on to study at Eastern Michigan University and later attended Texas Wesleyan University, and the University of Phoenix. He received his master’s degree and is planning on furthering his education even more in the near future.</p> <p>Frasure began his career as a history instructor in 1973 and is going on his 40th year of teaching. He has been educating students at EMCC for the past 19 years, 14 in which he has worked full time and five part time. Regardless of his status, the amount of effort put into his students and their learning is never anything less than above and beyond.</p> <p>Frasure’s teaching methods differ tremendously from those of other instructors - he doesn’t even use a textbook for the courses he offers. He apparently never used one textbook all throughout his four years at a university; he considers the truth to be found elsewhere.</p> <p>Everything that is taught in his classes is information that he has obtained through extensive research throughout the years. According to him, he has been researching history since before he entered college. He constantly learns something new every day, whether it be from books (he has about 3,000 in his collection), DVDS/documentaries, and even from students and colleagues who teach him things he didn’t know.</p> <p>“It’s always great to have someone come up and hand you a book, or come across a new documentary out of nowhere. It really makes me think, wow, I guess I’m supposed to be doing this after all.”</p> <p>Aside from not using textbooks for his students, he is a fan of collaborative work; he says he’s observed that students seem to comprehend information much better that way throughout his years as an instructor.</p> <p>EMCC student Michael Quiros said, “He’s really good at connecting the past to the present; it’s mind blowing. I think I’ve learned more taking this class than I have in any other history class.”</p> <p>John Frasure’s ultimate goal as an educator is to have his students walk away from his courses with more than just knowledge of history. He wants them to have an appreciation of it and to also apply all that they have learned not only in the classroom, but in life as well.</p> <p>“I want them to take knowledge, life lessons, and also a love for history and to know the benefit of it. I want them to be better citizens and make wise decisions- whatever that may be- voting, getting an education, whatever. Lifelong learning- that’s the key to happiness.”</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/emcc-classes" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">EMCC Classes</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/employees" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Employees</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/active-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Active Learning</a></div></div></div> Mon, 03 Mar 2014 20:09:28 +0000 ERIXL33951 167 at Teaching the Future /focus-learning/volume-2-issue-2/teaching-future <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Valeria Flores</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/focus-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Focus on Learning</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/focus-learning/166-johndonahue.jpg?itok=qra-g4kD"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/focus-learning/166-johndonahue.jpg?itok=qra-g4kD" width="480" height="320" alt="Economics Instructor John Donahue" title="Economics Instructor John Donahue" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>Educators are everywhere. Everyone has something to teach you. According to Merriam Webster’s online dictionary, an educator is someone who is “skilled in teaching.” As students we encounter teachers that change our outlook on life. We consider these teachers to be so good at what they do that we will recommend these teachers to anyone that is willing to take their class. A prime example of this kind of teacher is Estrella Mountain Community College’s (EMCC's) John Donahue, an economics teacher.</p> <p>Donahue has been an economics instructor for three years. He initially had wanted to be a teacher because his sister was going back to college. This inspired him to go back to school as well.</p> <p>"I love teaching and growing my students' understanding of the world. I have a passion for teaching because of the wonderful teachers I had in high school who all had a very positive influence on my life. I strive to give to my students what my teachers gave to me,” said Donahue.</p> <p>Donahue has an uncommon style of teaching. Instead of going to the book and completely repeating everything, he gives students an overview of the chapter in terms that are easy to understand and that students can relate to.</p> <p>“If someone doesn’t understand the topic, Mr. Donahue makes sure that they understand by slowing down the class.  He makes sure that you understand what he is teaching,” said Justin Thompson, a sophomore who is majoring in business.</p> <p>Economics is a tough subject to understand because of the terminology as well as the graphs. Macroeconomics does not necessarily have a lot of math, but it does have a few equations that are difficult to grasp.</p> <p>“I didn’t understand some graphs and when he tutored me, I understood them afterwards,” Caren Estrada, an EMCC freshman, said.</p> <p>Previous students know that when Donahue asks you about your day, he does mean it.</p> <p>“Mr. Donahue makes it known to that he wants to know everyone’s name. He memorizes everyone’s name and greets them when they come into class,” Thompson said.</p> <p>Donahue had the option of teaching in high school or college. However, Donahue chose to stay in the community college area.</p> <p>"I first thought that I wanted to teach high school when I began my career change to teach five years ago.  I soon realized that a good portion of high school students would prefer to be doing something else rather than sitting in an economics class!  I figured that I would have a much more focused and mature student body at Estrella and that I could have more influence there, than at the high school level.  I really enjoy teaching at my local community college.  I have had students that I know, or they know my wife, son, or daughter, in every class I have taught at Estrella.  I derive tremendous utility knowing and teaching my students and helping them understand how the world turns," Donahue said.</p> <p>In high school, it also depends on the teachers if they are going to be good at what they do.</p> <p>“In high school, I had an economics class and it was a six-week class. It was shorter, but I prefer Mr. Donahue’s passion for teaching. Whenever you ask him a question, you never feel uncomfortable,” Estrada said.</p> <p>Donahue is one of those teachers that captures your attention with the passion for his classes. He knows what he is doing and has an answer for a question that any of his students have.</p> <p>"I would like my students to have a better understanding of their environment and the world around them when they leave my class.  My goal is to prepare my students to be successful in life.  I always weave life lessons into my lesson plans and that is one of my favorite elements of teaching.  My wish is that my students realize that as they walk on down the trail of life, they should leave it better and nicer place than they found it," Donahue said.</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/emcc-classes" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">EMCC Classes</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/employees" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Employees</a></div></div></div> Mon, 03 Mar 2014 20:06:44 +0000 ERIXL33951 166 at