Lions Perspective - Cost of Education /tags/cost-education en Arizona Lawmakers Want to Block Common Core /focus-learning/volume-3-issue-1/arizona-lawmakers-want-block-common-core <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Joshua Sand</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/focus-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Focus on Learning</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/focus-learning/223-azcapitol.jpg?itok=ffqI6VIC"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/focus-learning/223-azcapitol.jpg?itok=ffqI6VIC" width="480" height="174" alt="Arizona Capitol building" title="New House Bill targets Common Core" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>The Common Core education standards, which were a major topic in Arizona’s 2014 elections, are now being attacked in a new bill passed by the Arizona House Education Committee. The major source of Common Core’s controversy has been the federal nature of the requirements, and the new bill, HB2190, attempts to give Arizona more rights to its education requirements, including the prevention of future adoption of any education requirements that are similar to twenty other states’ requirements. The new bill is already drawing its own controversy, but still has to be approved by the state legislature before it is put into effect.</p> <p><a href="http://azcapitoltimes.com/news/2015/02/19/lawmakers-move-to-kill-common-core-standards-in-arizona/" rel="nofollow">Read it at the AZ Capitol Times</a></p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/cost-education" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Cost of Education</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/education" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Education</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/community" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">community</a></div></div></div> Tue, 24 Feb 2015 22:26:53 +0000 MARDH70971 223 at EMCC Students Reflect on Community College Funding Options /issues-higher-education/volume-3-issue-1/emcc-students-reflect-community-college-funding-options <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Josh Sand</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/higher-education" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Issues in Higher Education</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/issues-higher-education/216-governordougducey0.jpg?itok=fMBgFvUR"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/issues-higher-education/216-governordougducey0.jpg?itok=fMBgFvUR" width="240" height="200" alt="Gov. Ducey" title="Arizona Governor Doug Ducey" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-video field-type-youtube field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><div class="youtube-container--responsive"><iframe id="youtube-field-player" class="youtube-field-player" width="100%" height="100%" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/4BLdBxf-YOE?wmode=opaque&autohide=1" title="Embedded video for EMCC Students Reflect on Community College Funding Options" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></div></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>Josh Sand, <em>TLP </em>intern, asks Estrella Mountain Community College students what they think about Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey's proposed budget cut to community colleges and universities, and about President Barrack Obama's proposed plan to make community colleges tuition-free.</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/financial-aid" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">financial aid</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/emcc" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">EMCC</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/cost-education" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Cost of Education</a></div></div></div> Mon, 09 Feb 2015 22:52:03 +0000 MARDH70971 216 at Social Workers Change Futures /editorials/volume-3-issue-1/social-workers-change-futures <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Ashley Osborne</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/editorial" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Editorials</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/editorials/206-socialworkii.jpg?itok=s8iFLunc"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/editorials/206-socialworkii.jpg?itok=s8iFLunc" width="480" height="359" alt="Social Work Program" title="Sociology Faculty Olga Tsoudis and Student Ashley Osborn Reaching Out to Students" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>When I decided to major in Social Work, I was already an established student at Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC). I found myself attending EMCC on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays while simultaneously attending Glendale Community College on Tuesdays and Thursdays for the required Social Work courses.</p> <p> After signing up for the E2 program, EMCC’s mentoring program, and meeting with my mentor, Sociology faculty, Dr. Olga Tsoudis, I decided to attend a Coffee Talk session and approach Dr. Ernie Lara, president of EMCC, about possibly starting a Social Work program at EMCC. He informed me that the courses were no longer offered because there did not seem to be a need for them. He agreed to consider offering the courses if I could provide proof that there are a number of students interested in Social Work.</p> <p> Fellow student Maria Moreno-Hasan assisted me in getting the word out and finding other students interested in Social Work. “Estrella Mountain is a welcoming campus that provides and equips students with what they need. That is why I attend this school, and why I wanted to be able to take the Social Work classes here” said Moreno-Hasan. With the help of professor Tsoudis, and several other faculty members and students, I was able to gather information on a number of students interested in Social Work.</p> <p> After a couple of months of reaching out to the students, I had a meeting with Dr. Pablo Landeros, Division Chair of Behavioral Sciences and Cultural Studies, Dr. Kathleen Iudicello, Interim Dean of Academic Affairs, Dr. Olga Tsoudis, Sociology Faculty, and Linda Cutright, Student Services Specialist: Academic Advisement and presented the information I had collected. Everyone agreed that there was a definite need for social workers in our community and a number of students interested in a Social Work major here at Estrella. As a result, this semester EMCC offers three different SWU classes.</p> <p> Social Work instructor, Stacy Moreno, said “Throughout this semester in Intro to Social Work, we explored just how broad social work really is as a field, the increasing number of job opportunities that are available, and the real impact we can have, positively, in the life of others; our families, our communities, our society, and in the world. Social workers think globally and act locally. Come explore with us and make change happen!”</p> <p> Starting this fall, EMCC offers the required Social Work courses that are needed to transfer to the Bachelor of Social Work program at Arizona State University.</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/carreers" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Carreers</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/cost-education" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Cost of Education</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/emcc-programs" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">EMCC Programs</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-engagement" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Engagement</a></div></div></div> Thu, 06 Nov 2014 21:42:28 +0000 SELCB60601 206 at Child Care Resources for Students /editorials/volume-3-issue-1/child-care-resources-students <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Kayt Ludi</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/editorial" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Editorials</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/editorials/205-childcareii.jpg?itok=e36-h2yM"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/editorials/205-childcareii.jpg?itok=e36-h2yM" width="480" height="271" alt="Child care center" title="Phoenix College Childcare, photo: K. Ludi" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>When someone says the word student, what comes to mind? Often, we think of eighteen-year-olds fresh out of high school, enrolled fulltime, with limited outside obligations to such things as work or family. But, according to a report by the Center for Postsecondary Economic Success, today nearly a quarter of all college and university students have children they are responsible for, with 13 percent of students being single parents.</p> <p> Another report, this one by Elisa Garcia for The Institute for Women’s Policy Research, states that child care is a crucial issue for 3.9 million American students. Does this hold true for students at Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC)?</p> <p> Tina Barton, a sophomore at EMCC, has two children, ages 11 and 12. Barton is pursuing a degree in Nonprofit Leadership Management. She says, “Child care is too expensive. I arrange [my] classes around my children’s school. If I used aftercare at my children’s school it would be $8 an hour for one child, so it is too expensive times two.”</p> <p> Availability of child care, or lack thereof, can even affect students who don’t have children of their own, like Katelyn Wiley, a sophomore at EMCC who is studying for a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Photojournalism. Wiley takes care of her 4 -year-old sister Trinity, while their parents are at work during the day. According to Wiley, “It is extremely hard to try to arrange my school schedule around watching her.”</p> <p> According to Susan Tavakoli, vice president of Administrative Services at EMCC, in her time at EMCC, since 2003, she is aware of several attempts to fund the building of a Childcare center on campus, but “other buildings took priority over building a child care center only because the demand was very low.” Tavakoli explained that “Plans to build a child care center were tabled in favor of building more learning spaces because the college was going through tremendous enrollment growth.”</p> <p> <br /> What is offered at EMCC instead, is the Child Care Assistance Award. The award, which is a scholarship voucher program funded by the school, is based on financial need. Students who utilize this funding have the ability to choose any child care provider they like, so long as the provider is licensed by either the Arizona Department of Health Services or the Arizona Department of Economic Security.</p> <p> The award ranges from $150 per semester for a student taking three credits who has one child, to $1,200 per semester for a student taking twelve or more credits who has three or more children.</p> <p> Tavakoli added that “Very few child care centers now exist throughout the Maricopa Community College District because the cost of running the centers is not offset by the fees or the demand. And potentially there’s a lot of liability associated with it.”</p> <p> Until recently, six of the ten Maricopa Community College campuses provided some form of on-campus child care program. Now, however, it is only available at three campuses: Mesa, Gateway, and Phoenix.</p> <p> The Phoenix College Family Care and Headstart Center program is under the auspices of the college’s Applied Technology Family and Consumer Science Department. Observing and participating at the child care center is also woven into some of the college’s Early Childhood Education (ECE) curriculum.</p> <p> Part of the staff is made up of interns from the school’s ECE program, and others are work-study participants. The funding for the program is partly from a U.S. Department of Education grant called Child Care Access Means Parents in School – Childcare Access Resources for Everyone (CCAMPIS-CARE).</p> <p> The program at Phoenix College is always in high-demand. Gloria McGinty is the director of the facility and according to her, “The parents really value having the program on site.”</p> <p> The facility, which has a total capacity of only 58, always has a long waiting list. Currently, the waiting list is over 30 names long for the program serving two-year-olds and over 60 families are waiting for availability in the program serving three-year-olds to five-year-olds.</p> <p> Students attending Phoenix College, either in-person or online, for at least 3 units, who are Pell Grant eligible, pay as little as $3.25 per hour to have their children taken care of by the Center’s board-approved staff.</p> <p> While certain students strongly feel that there should be a child care center on campus, the topic does not seem to be a big concern for the overall student population. Rene Willekens, dean of Planning, Research &amp; Effectiveness cites a recent survey conducted using the Noel Levitz Student Satisfaction Inventory. Out of all 79 questions in the survey that had an importance scale, child care ranked 78.</p> <p> Willekens added, “There is no doubt that some students could benefit greatly from on-site child care center; however, serving these students requires a substantial investment and only a handful of students would receive the service. With colleges across the nation facing budget cuts, investing in child care centers may come at the cost of reducing support services that benefit a larger number of students.”</p> <p> Due to this, EMCC has chosen to support other investments. One such program is the Estrella Hall expansion project. The EMCC website states “by retrofitting the existing space and adding physical buildings, the project expanded student learning opportunities.”</p> <p> During the spring of 2014, twenty to twenty-five EMCC students received between $150 and $1,200 for an entire semester to offset their child care costs. Yvette Cooke, administrative secretary for EMCC’s Office of Student Life and Leadership, which is in charge of the Assistance Program, said the thing she most wants students to know is, “That money is available for those who need it. Assistance is available. Please contact the Student Union if you need help paying for child care.”</p> <p>For further information on the EMCC Childcare Assistance Program or to download an application, visit <a href="http://www.estrellamountain.edu/students/student-life/childcare-assistance" rel="nofollow">http://www.estrellamountain.edu/students/student-life/childcare-assistance</a></p> <p>What can students do if they think on-campus childcare should be available at EMCC? Cooke said, “We have monthly Coffee Talks here at the Student Union. It’s an informal Q&amp;A session between students and the administration. Students are always encouraged to come and discuss issues that are important to them.”<br />  </p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/cost-education" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Cost of Education</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-challenges" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Challenges</a></div></div></div> Thu, 06 Nov 2014 21:36:04 +0000 SELCB60601 205 at Why High School Students Should Consider AAEC High School /beyond-campus/volume-2-issue-2/why-high-school-students-should-consider-aaec-high-school <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Katelyn Wiley</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/beyond-campus" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Beyond Campus</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/beyond-campus/180-aaec.jpg?itok=O472qIsz"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/beyond-campus/180-aaec.jpg?itok=O472qIsz" width="480" height="360" alt="AAEC High School" title="AAEC High School" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>Ten years ago, without a high school diploma finding work was difficult. Fast forward to 2014 and even <em>with</em> a college degree, finding work is a challenge.</p> <p>As of 2012, the percentage of people unemployed with an associate’s degree is 6.2, only 2.1 percent fewer than those with just a high school diploma, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics Data. Although the unemployment rate is on its way to recovery, the rate is still at one of its highest. Given that people are holding off from retiring or coming back from being retired, the struggle to find a job is at an all-time high.</p> <p>People are now aware of the struggle and have tackled this new situation several different ways, like trying to stay at the top of their class or putting aside their dream careers to pursue ones that seem more in reach. Others are looking for alternatives in high school.</p> <p>The Arizona Agribusiness and Equine Center (AAEC) High School is a program founded in 1997 that allows students to attend high school and college at the same time. The school's mission is described on its website as “[preparing] young adults for excellence in academics, social responsibility and lifelong learning.” AAEC High School is a public charter school and classes taken at the high school and at the college are paid for by the school and are free for students to attend. The only time a student has to pay for a class is if the student wishes to attend more classes at the college then required.</p> <p>The students that go through this school end up not only graduating with a high school diploma but also an associate’s degree. Dr. Mona Ramirez, the Principal at AAEC High School stated, “The great thing about AAEC is that it offers students the opportunity to earn a high school diploma while concurrently earning college credit toward an associate's degree.”</p> <p>This is one of the main deciding factors for students who choose to attend AAEC High School instead of normal high school. Getting an associate’s degree when they graduate will put them two years ahead of other high school students their age.</p> <p>Another reason why students decide to transfer to or attend AAEC High School is because of the learning environment. “At AAEC High School we stay true to our word when we say you will be taught in a better learning environment by keeping the classes small. Most high schools classes can go anywhere from 35 to 42 students, while at AAEC High School we keep our class to around 28 students,” Dr. Ramirez said.</p> <p>Even though college classes may vary in size, having such a small high school classroom environment makes a difference for the few classes students take on the AAEC high school campus. Some things that discourage students to attend AAEC High School is the fear of lacking a true high school experience, but AAEC High School does its best to make sure this does not happen by offering clubs, activities, and even holding prom at the end of the year.</p> <p>Maddy Taylor, a junior at AAEC High School, decided to start attending AAEC High School her second semester of her freshman year. “I decided to switch schools because I wanted to get a better education and graduate with an associate's degree.” She added, “The main reason why I originally didn’t go to AAEC High School was because I wanted to play sports, but then I found out that you can still try out and participate in high school sports at Millennium while going to AAEC High School, so I decided to make the switch as soon as I could.”</p> <p>If students do decide to attend AAEC High School, the next step for them to do is choose a program. They have seven different programs to start off their college career. The programs they offer are academics, engineering, equine studies, homeland security, international business, math and science, and last but not least, veterinary and medical.</p> <p>Each different program helps form a path into a desired career. For example, if someone chooses the engineering course, that person will be given classes to take to help receive an Associate of Science. Along with this, the program itself has formed plans and connections in the engineering field and each individual will be given guidance on planning the perfect path for that person to take. Not only does AAEC High School allow students to choose a program but they also have the choice of location. The AAEC High School program feeds into five colleges, one of them being Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC).<br /> .<br /> Once students have decided which campus they want to attend and what program they plan on attending, they are set to begin their learning career as AAEC High School student. “At first it was confusing having to go to the college and find classes on the campus but after I got used to everything, it became as normal as switching buildings at the high school campus during my morning classes there” Taylor stated.</p> <p>One benefit about AAEC High School is that they do not have a cutoff grade as to when students can transfer in. “You can start to attend AAEC as a freshman or you can transfer in your sophomore, junior, or even senior year.” Dr. Ramirez said. She then went on to explain that the only thing bad about joining AAEC High School late is that students may not get all the credits they need to graduate with an associate's degree. However, she says not to make that the reason not to transfer. Students who decide to transfer as late as their senior year will still be attending college and will still be leaving high school with some college credits, which will help them get their foot in the door for college in the future.</p> <p>To some students and parents the idea of going to college at such a young age might seem a bit scary but there are always people and friends there to help them along the way. “When I started at AAEC and was only 14 years old, I thought the 18 and 20 year old students would treat me different because they could notice the age gap, but it wasn’t as bad as I thought and I did feel very welcome” Gage Mikos, an AAEC student stated.</p> <p>All information needed to start attending Arizona Agribusiness &amp; Equine Center (AAEC) High School can be found on its website at <a href="http://www.aaechighschools.com" rel="nofollow">www.aaechighschools.com</a> or by phone at (602) 297 8500.</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/cost-education" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Cost of Education</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/education" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Education</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/emcc-programs" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">EMCC Programs</a></div></div></div> Mon, 03 Mar 2014 20:53:17 +0000 ERIXL33951 180 at MCCCD Raises Tuition /issues-higher-education/volume-2-issue-1/mcccd-raises-tuition <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Jessica Stewart</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/higher-education" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Issues in Higher Education</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/issues-higher-education/135-tuition.jpg?itok=kcte6FHC"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/issues-higher-education/135-tuition.jpg?itok=kcte6FHC" width="480" height="319" alt="MCCCD Tuition Increased" title="MCCCD Tuition Increased" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>Following in the wake of a dramatic reduction in state funding, the cost of tuition for Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC) students was raised $5 per credit hour, taking the cost of a credit from $76 to $81. The 6.5 percent increase was passed almost unanimously by the Maricopa County Community College District (MCCCD) governing board.</p> <p>MCCCD funding provided by the state was lowered to $7.9 million for the 2013-14 school year; a $400,000 decrease from the previous school year. The reduction in funding was based on a decline in student enrollment during the 2011-12 school year. The Maricopa District is currently working with other Arizona community college districts and the state government to develop a program that is based on college performance, instead of funding based purely on enrollment.</p> <p>Associate Vice Chancellor for Business Services, Gaye Murphy, shed some light on reasons behind tuition increases:  “Over the last few years the state of Arizona has cut more than $60 million in state support” says Murphy. To make up for that deficit the new budget calls for spending cuts, increased Maricopa County property taxes, a reallocation of $35 million in funding, and a tuition increase.</p> <p>Murphy further explained, “It is our responsibility to implement a balanced budget while maintaining the best quality education for students and meeting workforce demands.”</p> <p>EMCC student Travis Lindsey offers his opinion, “I am in favor of the increase. The drastic change in economy has left us with few options and the money is needed now.” Lindsey suggests the colleges seek support from local private investors. “Our biggest obstacle isn’t how to spend the money we have, it is how to generate future revenue we will need.”</p> <p>With the budget dynamics for the Maricopa Community College District becoming more complex and state funding steadily decreasing, the theme among administrators has been “do more with less” and that’s exactly their intent.</p> <p>Given a limited budget and restricted resources the colleges are strategically focusing investments in key programs. In order to improve efficacy, MCCCD will be enacting a full-scale review of programs and services offered at each college so they can understand what is needed and effective, and direct resources to areas with the most need.</p> <p>Other initiatives are the works to make the student experience better such as making access to information easier, the financial aid process smoother and timelier, and hiring more full-time faculty.  The idea behind these initiatives is to create a fundamental group of people who will be a support system for students and the institution.</p> <p>With all of the support from students, administration, and the community, EMCC will continue striving to provide the best standards of higher learning.</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/cost-education" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Cost of Education</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/educating-community" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Educating the Community</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-challenges" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Challenges</a></div></div></div> Mon, 23 Sep 2013 18:55:17 +0000 MAN2026125 135 at PTK’s Beta Alpha Xi Earns Honors in Action Hallmark Award /issues-higher-education/volume-2-issue-1/ptks-beta-alpha-xi-earns-honors-action-hallmark-award <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Lacey Holstein </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/higher-education" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Issues in Higher Education</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/issues-higher-education/134-ptk-project.jpg?itok=JLuag_tJ"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/issues-higher-education/134-ptk-project.jpg?itok=JLuag_tJ" width="480" height="360" alt="Overwhelmed and Tired Students Can Turn to Drugs" title="Overwhelmed and Tired Students Can Turn to Drugs" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>Last fall, Beta Alpha Xi’s, Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC) Phi Theta Kappa (PTK) Chapter, conducted research for a presentation that awarded the organization with the prestigious Honors in Action Hallmark Award.</p> <p>The project itself was centered on the PTK and MCCCD Honors Program’s theme, “Culture of Competition.”  PTK chapters nationally addressed the positive and negative impacts of competition in our daily lives, and Beta Alpha Xi chose to study how the pressure for academic success led to the rise of non-prescription drug use on college campuses to gain a competitive edge over peers.</p> <p>According to Beta Alpha Xi’s research, many students decide to take short cuts to succeed or simply become overwhelmed by the pressure to maintain a high GPA and excel in their classes. As a result, they often resort to self-medicating with stimulant drugs such as Adderall and Ritalin, thinking that they are both effective and safe. Research shows them to be neither, and quite high-risk.</p> <p>This prompted Beta Alpha Xi to pursue this topic for its Honors in Action (HIA) Project. To spread awareness on the dangers of these study drugs, the organization engaged in three full months of research to assemble an educational outreach program for students. This research weighed the pros and cons of the use of these prescription drugs.</p> <p>Marylyn Bradley, Chapter Advisor for the EMCC Chapter, described the process of managing the project, “This [process] took place through the summer and fall; it was a major undertaking.” It was a significant effort on the part of the chapter in terms of research, analysis, addressing of a community need, and reporting on project actions to the PTK Honors Society.</p> <p>The HIA Project educational outreach program concluded that the increased risk of addiction and altered brain development has resulted in a public health problem among college students.</p> <p>The efforts put into this project demonstrated scholarship, leadership, service, and fellowship- qualities that earned the EMCC Chapter with the Honors in Action Hallmark Award.</p> <p>Miguel Galarza, Communications Officer for the EMCC Chapter, said, “We were very successful. It was packed on the day of our presentation; we had 110 people, the largest audience ever for our chapter.” Overall, he regarded the chapter’s research and presentation as the best project of the year.</p> <p>The EMCC Chapter presented their findings on campus to Honors students, faculty, community members, and other student body guests.</p> <p>For more information on the EMCC Phi Theta Kappa Beta Alpha Xi Chapter and its work, go to the following links at: <a href="http://www.estrellamountain.edu/academics/phi-theta-kappa" rel="nofollow">http://www.estrellamountain.edu/academics/phi-theta-kappa</a> and <a href="http://www2.ptk.org/hallmarks/awards.htm" rel="nofollow">http://www2.ptk.org/hallmarks/awards.htm</a>.</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/cost-education" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Cost of Education</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-clubs-0" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Clubs</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-challenges" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Challenges</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/honors" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Honors</a></div></div></div> Mon, 23 Sep 2013 18:51:56 +0000 MAN2026125 134 at The Presidents’ Scholarship /issues-higher-education/volume-2-issue-1/presidents-scholarship <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Kaitlyn Thompson</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/higher-education" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Issues in Higher Education</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/issues-higher-education/131-scholarships.jpg?itok=q1GRIbvE"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/issues-higher-education/131-scholarships.jpg?itok=q1GRIbvE" width="480" height="320" alt="EMCC Scholarship Award Ceremony" title="EMCC Scholarship Award Ceremony" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>Did you realize that there is a chance you could attend Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC) without having to pay tuition? EMCC offers a scholarship called the Presidents’ Scholarship, which allows recent high school graduates to attend tuition free for two years.</p> <p>A recent graduate is someone who has graduated less than one academic year ago. The Presidents’ Scholarship is offered to students who either qualify through their placement test scores or who were ranked in the top 15 percent of their high school graduates. “I qualified for the Presidents’ Scholarship because I was in the top 15 percent of my high school’s graduating class,” commented scholarship recipient, Bailee Weber. Students who graduate in the top 15 percent also have to score a 5 on the Writeplacer and test into CRE 101 and into MAT 120.</p> <p>Another route for recent high school graduates to obtain the Presidents’ Scholarship is by way of their placement test scores. The placement test is an alternative that is accessible to those who did not have high GPAs before attending EMCC.  All full-time students take placement tests for reading, writing, and math before attending Estrella Mountain. These form the basis for the eligibility of the scholarship.</p> <p>If certain students have not met the placement test score requirements to obtain the Presidents’ Scholarship, they have the opportunity to retest for an attempt to experience community college tuition free. Students can test twice per year and after the second test, they have to wait for three months before testing a third time.</p> <p>Students then have to apply to the Honors Program. The Honors Program office is now located in Montezuma Hall 234. As soon as the Honors Program receives the application, official high school transcripts and placement test scores, a student can be admitted.</p> <p>Once the Presidents’ Scholarship has been awarded to an individual, a variety of steps will need to take place in order to maintain said scholarship. Scholarship recipient students must take one Honors-only cohort course each semester, or substitute an Honors class with an Honors project.</p> <p>“I'm actually in the process of doing an Honors project right now. For my project, I will be creating a PowerPoint presentation on the childhood disorder, autism. I really like it so far because I'm able to do a project on something I enjoy learning and teaching about. My professor has been really encouraging and excited about having a student do an honors project, too. So that has been really cool,” enthused Honors student Allison Beebe.</p> <p>Along with completing an Honors project, Presidents’ Scholarship recipients have to attend both an Honors sponsored event and an Honors forum each semester. Some examples of past events and forums include a forum about the testing of drugs in third world countries, and a conference for Women’s History Month. The Honors office offers a variety of events on campus throughout the semester, giving students an assortment of opportunities to meet their requirements.</p> <p>In order to maintain the Presidents’ Scholarship, students must uphold a GPA of at least 3.25 throughout their time at EMCC. The Honors Office provides assistance to students who feel that they will not be able to keep up that GPA, and recommends the variety of tutoring resources on campus. Maintaining a high GPA to keep a scholarship may seem like an unattainable feat for some students, but with the assistance of tutors in the Academic Success Center/Tutoring in Estrella Hall South, and a bit of elbow grease, students can find success.</p> <p>Students are encouraged to check with their advisors to see if they are eligible for the scholarship, as it may have been overlooked when starting EMCC. “When I went to register for classes for the Fall 2012 semester, my advisor looked at my placement test scores and told me I was eligible. After that, I went to the Honors Office and filled out paperwork, and then I had a scholarship. It sort of fell into my lap,” commented Beebe.</p> <p>“The Honors Program is a great experience and looks great on your resume,” declared Weber. The Honors Program can open many doors to students, such as transfer scholarships to universities based on GPAs, and the chance to engage in invigorating forums and lectures.</p> <p>For more information on the scholarship, please visit the following website: <a href="http://www.estrellamountain.edu/academics/honors/scholarships" rel="nofollow">http://www.estrellamountain.edu/academics/honors/scholarships</a></p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/cost-education" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Cost of Education</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/educating-community" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Educating the Community</a></div></div></div> Mon, 23 Sep 2013 18:47:19 +0000 MAN2026125 131 at Preparation Reduces Long Wait Times in Advisement /issues-higher-education/volume-2-issue-1/preparation-reduces-long-wait-times-advisement <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Manuel Guerrero</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/higher-education" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Issues in Higher Education</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/issues-higher-education/129-advisement.jpg?itok=KR2dIOQR"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/issues-higher-education/129-advisement.jpg?itok=KR2dIOQR" width="480" height="320" alt="Preparation Reduces Long Wait Times in Advisement " title="Students Waiting For Advisors Inside Komatke Hall" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC) students can expect to spend more time at Komatke Hall than they would like. The wait to see an advisor currently takes upwards of an hour due to students walking in without preparing for the meeting.</p> <p>EMCC is a growing campus and according to Linda Scott, Director of Career and Education Planning, the ratio of students per advisor is about 850 to one which has led to long wait times to see an advisor.</p> <p>However, EMCC student Matthew Ortiz pointed out that high schools were as much to blame for this situation as the colleges, because the structure is much different. “In high school, you have school counselors that guide you. That is not the case in college,” said Ortiz. “You lose that personal touch. It seems like each student is like a drop in a bucket at EMCC.”</p> <p>College has hundreds of class choices and career paths, and it is up to the students to educate themselves on which classes they need to take. Advisors have a bachelor’s degree from an accredited university and are trained on effective communication skills and excellent customer service. They are trained to help, but students need to prepare themselves for the meetings by doing their homework.  Students need to know what kinds of questions to ask.</p> <p>One way to prepare is to speak to a university representative at the EMCC Career and Transfer Center. Talking to an advisor and career counselor will give students a better idea about what classes to take and whether or not they need to transfer to a four-year institution to reach their educational or career goals. For students interested in transferring, MCCCD’s MAPP Program with Arizona State University lowers students’ tuition if they meet all the requirements upon completion and transfer. According to Scott, signing students up for this program helps students have a set plan.</p> <p>My.maricopa.edu is also an effective tool for students because it lists updated classes. Students can reserve a spot for classes from home as soon as they are available. They can also visit aztransfer.com to compare classes offered at EMCC to other schools in Arizona. The website includes schools from ten districts in Arizona, as well as the three major Arizona universities.</p> <p>If students do not want to go the online route, they have other options such as setting up a meeting with an advisor by calling 623-935-8888. The wait time for an appointment may be about a week, but it eliminates the waiting time in Komatke Hall for “drop in” advising.</p> <p>When students are at the appointment, they should be prepared, added Scott. Students should bring a copy of their check sheet for their degree choice, an idea of what classes they want to take, what they are planning to do in future semesters, and be ready to ask questions.</p> <p>“Students have to be informed consumers when it comes to their education. For example, when you want to buy a car, you know exactly what you want,” said Scott. “By students being prepared, it allows them more time on answering difficult questions, things they need to do (for graduation), and ways to make themselves more competitive in the job market.”</p> <p>Scott also advises students to pick their schedule early. Enrolling for classes two weeks before the semester starts, means running the risk that the needed classes are already full. A better way to enroll is to talk to an advisor for the upcoming semester in the current semester.</p> <p>For more information about the Advisement Center, please visit: <a href="http://www.estrellamountain.edu/students/advisement" rel="nofollow">http://www.estrellamountain.edu/students/advisement</a></p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-challenges" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Challenges</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/cost-education" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Cost of Education</a></div></div></div> Mon, 23 Sep 2013 18:40:04 +0000 MAN2026125 129 at Expanding Estrella Hall /editorials/volume-2-issue-1/expanding-estrella-hall <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Jessica Stewart</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/editorial" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Editorials</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/editorials/124-estrella-hall.jpg?itok=Gsq3qgn8"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/editorials/124-estrella-hall.jpg?itok=Gsq3qgn8" width="480" height="320" alt="Expansion of Estrella Hall" title="The Newly Built Estrella Hall North " /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>Since beginning my educational journey at Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC), I have seen the campus undergo much advancement, the most recent being the newly completed Estrella Hall North.</p> <p>In the old Information Commons, I always felt that when sitting next to someone I was invading that person’s personal space and vice versa. This was something that made me hesitant to use the computers there. The new, larger space feels quieter and more comfortable to me.</p> <p>The new space features 18 state-of-the-art learning studios and seven remodeled classrooms specifically designated for computer courses. The new building expands several preexisting areas, such as the Library, the Learning Enhancement Center, and Information Commons. It is divided into a north and south region. Each space has been carefully crafted to deliver a student oriented, engaging environment, while supporting different learning styles.</p> <p>The study rooms offer a place for students to study individually or to meet for group work. The study rooms have expanded to 14 rooms, compared to six in the old building. Some learning tools included in these rooms are updated computers, desks to spread out on, whiteboards for visual thinking, and a TV so students can practice presenting on something other than small computer screens. Teamwork and peer collaboration are encouraged and facilitated by these group friendly set-ups, as well as the many group-seating arrangements around the building.</p> <p>The top half of the building houses faculty offices and student computers. The expansion has also allowed for increased tutoring services with the opening of the Academic Success Center/Tutoring which includes “Math Success,” “Science Success,” “Writing Success,” and “Reading, Languages and Occupational Success.”</p> <p>According to Rodica Heinz, the Director of Academic Success Center, the purpose of the remodeled building is to have all academic support centrally located for the students.</p> <p>Estrella Hall South has been remodeled and used as the new location for all tutoring services, which allowed the college to increase the seating in tutoring.</p> <p>EMCC student, John Cox, believes the expansion of Estrella Hall provides students with complete support: “Now that Math and Science tutoring has moved in, Estrella Hall has all the help a student could need from computer programs like Word, Photoshop, and Flash, to English, Math, Science and technical support.</p> <p>“The goal of the new building was to attract students coming from developmental classes and it has worked,” said Heinz. “Students really enjoy coming here and asking for help.”</p> <p>Construction on Estrella Hall began in February 2012 and has completed the third phase in the college’s campus master plan, which is constantly growing to expand student and community learning by implementing innovative learning environments.</p> <p>I believe that these expansion plans reflect Estella’s commitment to continually evolving with students needs and offering continuing support in making students successful. My only regret is that these renovations didn’t take place sooner so that I could enjoy them before I transferred.</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/cost-education" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Cost of Education</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/emcc-campus" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">EMCC Campus</a></div></div></div> Mon, 23 Sep 2013 18:24:02 +0000 MAN2026125 124 at