Lions Perspective - Student Challenges /tags/student-challenges en University-bound /focus-learning/volume-3-issue-1/university-bound <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Shea Huffman</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/focus-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Focus on Learning</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/focus-learning/240-kylerodrigues.png?itok=6tyJRoDY"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/focus-learning/240-kylerodrigues.png?itok=6tyJRoDY" width="480" height="319" alt="Courtesy of Kyle Rodrigues" title="Kyle Rodrigues is ready to transfer to a 4-year university" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-add-images field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/medium/public/kaitlin_neises.jpg?itok=FSnZ4Ci2" width="165" height="220" alt="Courtesy of Kaitlin Neises" title="Kaitlin Neises is ready to transfer" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> </p> <p>Being in a community college is one of the safest, most sheltered methods of attending college in today’s society. Community colleges are places that anyone and everyone in one’s community can attend, and it is easy to feel right at home on small, tight-knit campuses.</p> <p>This is especially true for Estrella Mountain Community College, being one of the smallest community colleges in the Maricopa Community College County District. While some may not want or need to leave the comfort of the community college setting, some students here on campus are actively preparing to transfer to a university this upcoming fall semester, and are excited to begin a new journey in their lives.</p> <p><a href="http://www.maricopa.edu/transfer/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Transferring</a> to a large university such as Arizona State University, University of Arizona or Northern Arizona University can be daunting. For starters, if you attend a community college, you are already used to the way things work—the small class sizes, the close student-teacher relationships, the one-on-one mentoring offered on campus; things are starkly different at most universities around the globe. It isn’t that they do not want to provide as much support as they can; the fact of the matter is they typically are too big to have the capacity to accommodate everyone’s needs and desires, whether that be your professor personally going over a paper or exam with you, or getting you into a meeting with a counselor at the last-minute. While some of these accommodations offered at EMCC may not be offered at a university, there are still countless benefits to transferring.</p> <p> Kaitlin Neises, a sophomore at EMCC, claims she knows exactly how different attending a university will be compared to a community college. Neises says, “I have friends who have gone to universities straight out of high-school, and I have visited them in their dorms. The environment is very different, and there are a lot more students. It was a bit overwhelming when I first took a tour to the University of Arizona.” Neises goes on to say how she felt on her first campus visit to UA, the school she plans to transfer to: “While it was a little scary at first, the representatives reassured me that everyone gets nervous in the beginning, but soon everyone is able to find their place at the university.” Needless to say, Neises is no longer as anxious as she was, and is now looking forward to tackling this new chapter in her life head-on.</p> <p>Some may be wondering about the process of transferring to a university. EMCC has dedicated resources to help with this process. <strong><a href="http://www.estrellamountain.edu/students/advisement/transfer" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Students need to review and follow the tips and instructions outlined on EMCC Advisement’s Transfer webpage.</a></strong></p> <p>Additionally, when applying to a university, students must not rush on any essay questions, and it’s important to ask for letters of recommendation from professors, academic associates, employers, etc.; these are the aspects of one’s application that will make students stand out in the sea of endless applicants.</p> <p>Twenty-year-old Kyle Rodrigues, a sophomore student, talks about his experience with the transfer process that he is currently undergoing: “So far, the process has been pretty smooth, and all my classes are transferable, so I’m set with that. I am very excited to get more involved in my major once I’m at ASU, since EMCC could not offer me the same major-based classes that the university has.” He shared with The Lion’s Perspective how he feels toward change; for him, even though it might be a little frightening he feels “getting used to the larger class sizes at a university should be interesting. After being in such small classes for so long, it will be a little strange. But I’m definitely up for the challenge!”</p> <p>Although change can seem daunting, it also has the potential to open many new doors that one may not have even known existed before. For many, EMCC serves as the beginning of something new in their lives. For countless high-school students, it was the first move away from the shelter of high-school and into more of a “real world” setting; others used EMCC as a fresh start to a better life.</p> <p> Estrella Mountain can be used as a stepping stone toward the future, for those young and old. Additionally, for those transferring to universities, it is simply the stepping stone they needed to take before opening up that first new door in their lives.</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/graduation" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">graduation</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-challenges" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Challenges</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/community" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">community</a></div></div></div> Mon, 27 Apr 2015 17:48:37 +0000 MARDH70971 240 at How To Thrive in an Online Class /focus-learning/volume-3-issue-1/how-thrive-online-class <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Shea Huffman</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/focus-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Focus on Learning</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/focus-learning/217-areyoureadyforelearning.png?itok=stypmqCF"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/focus-learning/217-areyoureadyforelearning.png?itok=stypmqCF" width="480" height="374" alt="R U ready for eLearning?" title="before signing up for an online class, make sure you are ready" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>Almost everyone enrolled in college is going to have to take at least one online class in their lifetime. While it may seem like cakewalk work, in reality it is far from it. The workload can verge on extensive, due-dates loom overhead like a rain cloud, and the face-to-face aspect of most classes is dashed. <br /> If you are considering an online class, you may be wondering how you’re ever going to have the ability to juggle so many responsibilities. A good place to start is Estrella Mountain Community College’s own eLearning webpage<a href="http://www.estrellamountain.edu/academics/classes/orientation" rel="nofollow">— take the eLearning Orientation</a> and determine if eLearning is right for you.</p> <p>If you’ve taken the plunge and are ready for an online class, this guide is for you.</p> <p><strong>1. Have a Reliable Computer</strong><br /> A specific rule-of-thumb for online classes is to always make sure you have a reliable computer at home, booted with the capability of reliable internet access. You never want to be faced with a situation where your computer isn’t working or you don’t have internet access. Remember, in an online class or even hybrid, the main means of communication with your teacher and getting homework turned in on time is through the computer, so a reliable computer with trustworthy internet is key. However, say your computer stops working—crashes all of a sudden at 11p.m. when you’re trying to submit that midterm essay and you nearly have a heart-attack, right? You may be wondering what to do if this unfortunate turn of events decides to roll your way. Well, step two has you covered.</p> <p><strong>2.  The Back-Up Plan(s)</strong><br /> It’s always important to keep a back-up plan under your sleeve in case of emergencies. Just like fire hydrants are used for emergencies, you can use your back-up plan(s) to help act as a safeguard when you need it. If your computer decides that the day to shut down is in the middle of an important assignment that you were trying to turn in, one that will possibly cost you half of your grade, use that lifeline to get your help. A back-up plan for online classes should be something along the lines of using a computer down at the library, knowing a friend that could let you borrow their computer or, in the event Canvas is malfunctions, being ready to submit the assignment in a different way, say by emailing it to your instructor. A flash drive is a must-have to backup all data, just in case your files get deleted from your computer.  With back-up plans, you will always have something to fall back on.</p> <p><strong>3. Be Technologically Savvy</strong><br /> Speaking of falling back on things, it will always be beneficial to you in an online class to be technologically savvy. Nowadays, it is pertinent that one be able to easily operate and navigate a computer, and for online classes, to be proficient operating the class’s eBook or other required materials. In addition, one must be able to surf the web and use whatever Learning Management System the school has for their classes; in EMCC’s case, Canvas. If you do not know how to use Canvas or are a little rusty on the subject, you can always go to the Computer Commons in Estrella Hall on campus to receive help with it.</p> <p><strong>4.  Remember, the Teacher is Your Friend</strong><br /> Your teacher is someone you can fall back on. If you ever need help or assistance, they are always there to mentor and guide. Alternatively, remember you can always use the <a href="http://www.estrellamountain.edu/students/tutoring" rel="nofollow">Tutoring service</a> (free, available at Estrella Hall South). Check and see if there are specific tutoring hours for your discipline. It’s always advisable to schedule an appointment.<br /> If you are having technical problems, don’t forget to try <a href="http://www.estrellamountain.edu/students/computer-commons" rel="nofollow">Computer Commons</a> or customer service first, because the teachers are not the ones who run Canvas, nor can they always help you troubleshoot. However, any help you need pertaining to an assignment or question about the class would be something in their wheel-house, and they will gladly assist.</p> <p>So now that you know all the steps toward passing an online class, you can now confidently sign up for that class you need. Just remember--you should always try to stay ahead of the game and keep up on your work, and never let yourself fall behind, or else you may get left in the dust. Keep a reliable internet, be technologically prepared, and never be afraid to ask for help.</p> <p>With drive and determination (and tips like these) you will not fail!</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/elearning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">eLearning</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-support" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Support</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-challenges" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Challenges</a></div></div></div> Thu, 12 Feb 2015 21:04:10 +0000 MARDH70971 217 at College Life & Sleep Deprivation /campus-life/volume-3-issue-1/college-life-sleep-deprivation <div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/campus-life" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Campus Life</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>According to<a href="http://www.brown.edu/Student_Services/Health_Services/Health_Education/common_college_health_issues/sleep.php" rel="nofollow"> Brown University</a> in Providence, Rhode Island, college students are among the most sleep deprived in the United States.  According to a Brown-sponsored study, only 11% of college students have good sleep quality at night, and 73% have occasional sleep problems. This same study found that 18% of college men and 30% of college women reported suffering from insomnia within the past 3 months, and over half reported feeling sleepy during the morning. It's well documented that sleep deprived students perform significantly worse than students who regularly get a good night's sleep, causing problems in focusing, retaining information, and even driving.</p> <p> </p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-challenges" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Challenges</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/healthy-living" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Healthy Living</a></div></div></div> Tue, 03 Feb 2015 21:33:38 +0000 MARDH70971 213 at Child Care Resources for Students /editorials/volume-3-issue-1/child-care-resources-students <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Kayt Ludi</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/editorial" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Editorials</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/editorials/205-childcareii.jpg?itok=e36-h2yM"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/editorials/205-childcareii.jpg?itok=e36-h2yM" width="480" height="271" alt="Child care center" title="Phoenix College Childcare, photo: K. Ludi" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>When someone says the word student, what comes to mind? Often, we think of eighteen-year-olds fresh out of high school, enrolled fulltime, with limited outside obligations to such things as work or family. But, according to a report by the Center for Postsecondary Economic Success, today nearly a quarter of all college and university students have children they are responsible for, with 13 percent of students being single parents.</p> <p> Another report, this one by Elisa Garcia for The Institute for Women’s Policy Research, states that child care is a crucial issue for 3.9 million American students. Does this hold true for students at Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC)?</p> <p> Tina Barton, a sophomore at EMCC, has two children, ages 11 and 12. Barton is pursuing a degree in Nonprofit Leadership Management. She says, “Child care is too expensive. I arrange [my] classes around my children’s school. If I used aftercare at my children’s school it would be $8 an hour for one child, so it is too expensive times two.”</p> <p> Availability of child care, or lack thereof, can even affect students who don’t have children of their own, like Katelyn Wiley, a sophomore at EMCC who is studying for a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Photojournalism. Wiley takes care of her 4 -year-old sister Trinity, while their parents are at work during the day. According to Wiley, “It is extremely hard to try to arrange my school schedule around watching her.”</p> <p> According to Susan Tavakoli, vice president of Administrative Services at EMCC, in her time at EMCC, since 2003, she is aware of several attempts to fund the building of a Childcare center on campus, but “other buildings took priority over building a child care center only because the demand was very low.” Tavakoli explained that “Plans to build a child care center were tabled in favor of building more learning spaces because the college was going through tremendous enrollment growth.”</p> <p> <br /> What is offered at EMCC instead, is the Child Care Assistance Award. The award, which is a scholarship voucher program funded by the school, is based on financial need. Students who utilize this funding have the ability to choose any child care provider they like, so long as the provider is licensed by either the Arizona Department of Health Services or the Arizona Department of Economic Security.</p> <p> The award ranges from $150 per semester for a student taking three credits who has one child, to $1,200 per semester for a student taking twelve or more credits who has three or more children.</p> <p> Tavakoli added that “Very few child care centers now exist throughout the Maricopa Community College District because the cost of running the centers is not offset by the fees or the demand. And potentially there’s a lot of liability associated with it.”</p> <p> Until recently, six of the ten Maricopa Community College campuses provided some form of on-campus child care program. Now, however, it is only available at three campuses: Mesa, Gateway, and Phoenix.</p> <p> The Phoenix College Family Care and Headstart Center program is under the auspices of the college’s Applied Technology Family and Consumer Science Department. Observing and participating at the child care center is also woven into some of the college’s Early Childhood Education (ECE) curriculum.</p> <p> Part of the staff is made up of interns from the school’s ECE program, and others are work-study participants. The funding for the program is partly from a U.S. Department of Education grant called Child Care Access Means Parents in School – Childcare Access Resources for Everyone (CCAMPIS-CARE).</p> <p> The program at Phoenix College is always in high-demand. Gloria McGinty is the director of the facility and according to her, “The parents really value having the program on site.”</p> <p> The facility, which has a total capacity of only 58, always has a long waiting list. Currently, the waiting list is over 30 names long for the program serving two-year-olds and over 60 families are waiting for availability in the program serving three-year-olds to five-year-olds.</p> <p> Students attending Phoenix College, either in-person or online, for at least 3 units, who are Pell Grant eligible, pay as little as $3.25 per hour to have their children taken care of by the Center’s board-approved staff.</p> <p> While certain students strongly feel that there should be a child care center on campus, the topic does not seem to be a big concern for the overall student population. Rene Willekens, dean of Planning, Research &amp; Effectiveness cites a recent survey conducted using the Noel Levitz Student Satisfaction Inventory. Out of all 79 questions in the survey that had an importance scale, child care ranked 78.</p> <p> Willekens added, “There is no doubt that some students could benefit greatly from on-site child care center; however, serving these students requires a substantial investment and only a handful of students would receive the service. With colleges across the nation facing budget cuts, investing in child care centers may come at the cost of reducing support services that benefit a larger number of students.”</p> <p> Due to this, EMCC has chosen to support other investments. One such program is the Estrella Hall expansion project. The EMCC website states “by retrofitting the existing space and adding physical buildings, the project expanded student learning opportunities.”</p> <p> During the spring of 2014, twenty to twenty-five EMCC students received between $150 and $1,200 for an entire semester to offset their child care costs. Yvette Cooke, administrative secretary for EMCC’s Office of Student Life and Leadership, which is in charge of the Assistance Program, said the thing she most wants students to know is, “That money is available for those who need it. Assistance is available. Please contact the Student Union if you need help paying for child care.”</p> <p>For further information on the EMCC Childcare Assistance Program or to download an application, visit <a href="http://www.estrellamountain.edu/students/student-life/childcare-assistance" rel="nofollow">http://www.estrellamountain.edu/students/student-life/childcare-assistance</a></p> <p>What can students do if they think on-campus childcare should be available at EMCC? Cooke said, “We have monthly Coffee Talks here at the Student Union. It’s an informal Q&amp;A session between students and the administration. Students are always encouraged to come and discuss issues that are important to them.”<br />  </p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/cost-education" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Cost of Education</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-challenges" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Challenges</a></div></div></div> Thu, 06 Nov 2014 21:36:04 +0000 SELCB60601 205 at What Makes a Good Math Teacher? /focus-learning/volume-3-issue-1/what-makes-good-math-teacher <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Kayt Ludi</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/focus-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Focus on Learning</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/focus-learning/199-mathteacher.jpg?itok=7FKWAfPT"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/focus-learning/199-mathteacher.jpg?itok=7FKWAfPT" width="480" height="320" alt="Math Book" title="Math classes represent a challenge for many students at EMCC." /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>Math can be hard. Students will complain about it. People long out of school will sometimes seem to have a shiver run up their spines thinking back to their last brush with it. So, how does a person teach it well?</p> <p>Above all, math is cumulative. If you cannot remember the basics, it is very hard to move on to the complex. And according to About.com, if students eked out a C in their last class, they are really moving on to the next class having only “absorbed and understood about half of what they should.”</p> <p>Rebecca Baranowski, the division chair for Math, Physics and Engineering at Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC) said, “I do know, from experience, that students who got a C don't typically do well in the next math class.  For example, students who got Cs in MAT151/182 tend to not pass Calculus I. It is a high percentage (above 50 percent), based on my experience.”</p> <p>How can math instructors help students absorb more? Baranowski said effective math teachers who have the ability to adapt to the students in their course, are continually assessing themselves to see what is working, and are continually assessing the students, though not just through formal exams. She added that they have a good working “knowledge of [the] material and how it is used,” as well as an “ability to explain concepts in a way that students can understand.”</p> <p>In addition Baranowski listed a few characteristics as important: being strict yet fair, having good classroom management skills, and having fun and enjoy[ing] the teaching.</p> <p>According to Valeria Flores, a Journalism major in her sophomore year at EMCC, “If the teacher teaches straight out of the book or uses the slides that are provided to them, then it becomes a little challenging.”</p> <p>Baranowski explained that, “Some students need instructors to do a lot of hands-on activities to help them truly understand the why behind the math. Some students need to work with other students in class. Others need a lecturer type instructor and students who have a fear of math need a nurturing type of instructor who is also their personal coach.”</p> <p>Baranowski continued to say that students should ask themselves, “Does the instructor teach to all the different learning styles? Is the instructor patient with students? Does the instructor push the students within reason? Does the instructor expect too much or too little of the students?” Baranowski points out that these things could have a huge impact on the success of a student in class. </p> <p>Flores described a good math teacher as, “Someone who actually takes the time out of his/her day to answer the student’s questions and who doesn't limit his/her time.” While she said a bad instructor gets frustrated over being asked questions.</p> <p>So, what can you do if you have a math teacher you either love or hate? Baranowski listed some options. First of all there is always “word of mouth— tell other students.” Secondly, she suggested reporting it on the evaluations that faculty give out. Furthermore, “let the division chair know, especially if it is good. Most information given to the division chair is about bad experiences, so having good feedback is great.” And finally, Baranowski suggested reporting it on <a href="http://ratemyprofessor.com" rel="nofollow">ratemyprofessor.com</a></p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/students" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Students</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-challenges" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Challenges</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/learning-styles" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Learning Styles</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-support" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Support</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/math" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Math</a></div></div></div> Tue, 04 Nov 2014 22:41:44 +0000 MARDH70971 199 at Not Just a Man’s World Anymore /issues-higher-education/volume-3-issue-1/not-just-mans-world-anymore <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Shea Huffman</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/higher-education" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Issues in Higher Education</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/issues-higher-education/194-nursing.jpg?itok=zJPmFdoJ"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/issues-higher-education/194-nursing.jpg?itok=zJPmFdoJ" width="480" height="320" alt="nursing" title="Nursing is still a field that is predominantly female today." /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>“A woman is the full circle. Within her is the power to create, nurture and transform,” author Diane Mariechild once stated, and her words could not be truer. Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC) celebrated Women’s History Month on March, 2014 I decided to interview two women in two different fields, one in nursing and the other one in film editing.</p> <p> Each can offer a different career outlook on the equality of men and women.  One has a career that is mainly female-dominated, and the other is entering a predominantly male-dominated career. I wanted to interview both of them because they are in two fields I am considering, and because I knew they would have different opinions on the subject of gender equality.</p> <p> Margaret Varner is a registered nurse on a medical surgical unit at Scottsdale Memorial Hospital. I chose Varner as my expert source because she has already completed her education, and is currently in the midst of her first years as a nurse. The road to her career was not an easy one; she had to earn an associate’s degree, pass state board certifications called “NCLEX” and complete a standardized statewide test.</p> <p> According to Varner, women are treated the exact same as men when it comes to nursing. “It is a very respected and trusted profession, consisting predominantly of women, so women have really promoted nursing as a profession,” she stated, confirming my assumptions that the career was mainly carried out by women.</p> <p> Varner explained that one-in-seven nurses are women, making that around an 85 percent rate. “In nursing, there really is no gender gap [when it comes to pay],” says Varner, “it is equal for both men and women. It is not really about gender, but rather the work one does. You get paid according to supply and demand, experience and credentialing. The amount of effort you put in, whether male or female, will match the salary you are paid.”</p> <p> Nursing used to be a stereotyped career, where people would look at you strange or roll their eyes if you said you wanted to be a nurse. It was just a woman’s job and nothing more.  However, that has changed in the past years, as more men have decided to join the profession.</p> <p> Varner is adamant about how much she appreciates being able to this job every day. “Nurses can really affect people, and they can make a huge difference in how a patient’s prognosis turns out. I wouldn’t want to be anything else.”<br /> Cassidy Tilden is an 18-year-old student at Arizona State University (ASU), attending college to pursue a film degree. She is aiming to be a video editor for either movies or television. Her career field, compared to Varner’s, is male-dominated.</p> <p>Tilden quietly admitted, “I feel a little intimidated by it. The males in my industry make me feel inferior compared to them; behaving as if they are automatically better than me. The work has to speak for itself, because a lot of people underestimate a woman in this field.”</p> <p> Women also earn less than men do in film editing, which is a discouraging prospect when entering the field.</p> <p>Although many women are beginning to stand up and squeeze their way into the career, many others are too afraid of being pushed to the side simply because they are female.</p> <p>Tilden stated, “I wouldn’t say I’m confident. But I definitely will not let it discourage me from working in the industry that I have a passion for. I will have to work twice as hard, but that’s okay. It just prompts me to be the best I can be and constantly improve.”</p> <p>I found this to be extremely uplifting. It gives women a more positive outlook on being independent and doing what their heart pulls them towards, instead of shying away from it.</p> <p>Despite the disadvantages Tilden faces in her career, she refuses to give up on what she has always dreamed of becoming. Her parting words were particularly moving: “Constantly challenge yourself. Be unique. Everyone wants to be the next Quentin Tarantino. What makes you different? Revel in the differences. Expand yourself and always be creative, and never give up on your dreams.”</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-engagement" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Engagement</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-challenges" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Challenges</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/students" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Students</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/emcc-classes" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">EMCC Classes</a></div></div></div> Tue, 04 Nov 2014 22:20:03 +0000 MARDH70971 194 at Fitness Trends among College Students /issues-higher-education/volume-3-issue-1/fitness-trends-among-college-students <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Nick Balderrama, Cassandra Milligan, Reanna Moreno</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/higher-education" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Issues in Higher Education</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/issues-higher-education/192-bike.jpg?itok=fPgaFsBw"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/issues-higher-education/192-bike.jpg?itok=fPgaFsBw" width="480" height="313" alt="fitness" title="Keeping Fit, photo: Q. Ledvina" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>The transition from high school to college brings about vast changes and challenges for many college students. One major challenge many students face when entering college is staying fit.</p> <p>The hectic college life often leads students to become more sedentary and make poorer meal choices. Doing so contributes to students becoming unhealthy. Obesity rates continue to rise yearly among the college crowd. Fortunately, there are ways to halt the ongoing trend, including joining a fitness program here at Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC) and local gyms.</p> <p>The “freshman 15” is a notion that is frequently recognized among college students. The “15” refers to pounds gained by first-year college students, usually as fat and not lean muscle mass.</p> <p>According to Jay Zagorsky, research scientist in the Center for Human Resource Research at Ohio State University, freshmen do typically gain weight, but not nearly 15 pounds. In an article entitled “The Freshman 15: A Critical Time for Obesity Intervention or Media Myth?”  Zagorsky and fellow researcher, Patricia Smith K. conclude that the average weight change for first-year college students runs from 1.5 to 8.8 pounds, with a mean of 3.8 pounds.</p> <p>Obviously, college can be a chaotic atmosphere as students must prioritize their responsibilities. This means that finishing homework and studying for exams becomes a top priority. Moreover, the financial burden that is placed upon students with tuition costs also makes landing a job another priority. In essence, working out and exercising is not a main concern for many students, and for some, becomes entirely disregarded.</p> <p>In a 2011 qualitative analysis published in The Journal of American College Health, Lara J. LaCaille and a group of researchers note that the transition to college also means no longer participating in organized sports for some students.</p> <p>However, there are factors that motivate students to find different avenues for exercise. Social support and convenience of on-campus facilities many times motivate students to engage in some form of physical activity.</p> <p>However, exercise is not the only thing that contributes to getting into shape or maintaining fitness. A healthy diet is another crucial component as it pertains to fitness. Oftentimes, a healthy diet is glossed over and many college students continue to maintain unhealthy eating habits.</p> <p>Because succeeding in academics is a priority, studying or doing homework takes up much of a student’s time. This also means less time for eating and preparing meals. Without enough time to visit a grocery store and to purchase healthy foods, most students resort to fast food and buying foods that satisfy their hunger.</p> <p>Furthermore, prolonged periods of time without eating throughout the day causes students to binge-eat on higher calorie foods at night. Binge eating on higher calorie foods puts students at risk of exceeding their caloric maintenance levels and these excess calories are what causes fat surplus.</p> <p>To encourage healthy habits, Estrella Mountain Community College offers a fitness and wellness program on campus. Students can participate in several of the wellness programs offered at EMCC, like the free Mile Club Challenge, where participants set a fitness goal and keep track of the miles they walk, run, hike or bike. </p> <p>An alternative is to register for a fitness class and receive credit for it upon completion. Throughout the course, students can learn the importance of a healthy and active lifestyle and how it affects academic performance. Not to mention, the courses themselves contribute to achieving fitness goals.</p> <p>Another way for students to engage in physical activity is by getting a gym membership. EMCC has a partnership with Valley of the Sun YMCA, which allows students to join the Y at discounted rates. Students can opt for one of the following one-semester membership options: Adult Student Membership, $70; Couple Membership (student &amp; adult living in the same household) $85; Family I (student &amp; children age 18 and under living in the same household) $100; Family II (student &amp; adult &amp; children age 18 and under living in the same household), $150.</p> <p>As for healthy eating, students can choose lower calorie foods to eat in a timely manner throughout the day, instead of restricting themselves due to time constraints. For more specific fitness goals such as gaining muscle mass or losing body fat, students need to learn about their calorie maintenance level and plan around it.</p> <p>For more information about EMCC’s fitness and wellness program, visit <a href="http://www.estrellamountain.edu/fitness-wellness/students-employees" rel="nofollow">http://www.estrellamountain.edu/fitness-wellness/students-employees</a><br />  </p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-challenges" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Challenges</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/fitness" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Fitness</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/wellness" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Wellness</a></div></div></div> Tue, 04 Nov 2014 22:13:51 +0000 MARDH70971 192 at Loving to Help Others /profiles/volume-2-issue-2/loving-help-others <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Regina Gonzalez </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/profile" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Profiles</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/profiles/175-seantingle.jpg?itok=T04iGGPS"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/profiles/175-seantingle.jpg?itok=T04iGGPS" width="480" height="320" alt="Writing Center Tutor Sean Tingle" title="Writing Center Tutor Sean Tingle" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>It can be easy to feel intimidated by the idea of seeking out tutoring, but students should not feel that way. Sean Tingle is a tutor at the Writing Center in Estrella Hall at Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC). Tingle has a lot of patience with his students.</p> <p>Tingle grew up in an inconsistent home; he would move to different states since the age of one.  His father was in the Air Force and his family moved constantly. He lived in California, Texas, Washington, D.C., Mississippi and finally Arizona by the age of 13. He resided in Glendale, Ariz. until the age of 17 and graduated from Mountain Ridge High School.</p> <p>He attended Glendale Community College (GCC) while still in high school and then transferred his credits to Northern Arizona University. There he received a bachelor's degree in Humanities and later a master's degree in English. </p> <p>He found his passion for helping others when he was attending GCC.</p> <p>When Tingle was a baby, his father would carry him around, point to things all over, tell him what they were called, and explain what they were. This sparked a lifelong desire to learn and help others.</p> <p>Tingle's parents would help him a lot and it lead him to helping others. He would help his little brother and cousins with schoolwork.  He also worked at Paradise Education Center where he helped students after school.  Tingle said, “Working with the children at Paradise Education Center was a wonderful and rewarding experience.”</p> <p>Tingle taught English in Japan during the 2012/13 school year. As a result of his journey to Japan he learned the Japanese language. He taught at EMCC for one year before leaving to Japan, and then returned to EMCC the day after coming home. He loved his experience there, but he was excited to return to EMCC.</p> <p>His passion for helping others grew because he thinks learning is very important.  Tingle said, “All students are capable of success. I want to help them achieve their goals”.  In the future he wants to continue teaching and helping students. He hopes to eventually earn a doctorate degree.</p> <p>He is now a tutor and professor at EMCC. Many students call him “Mr. Sean”. He teaches English 081, 091 and 101. He recently received an award from EMCC’s Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society for being an exceptional mentor.</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/learning-styles" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Learning Styles</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-achievement" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Achievement</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-challenges" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Challenges</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-support" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Support</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/employees" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Employees</a></div></div></div> Mon, 03 Mar 2014 20:37:55 +0000 ERIXL33951 175 at Help Along the Way /focus-learning/volume-2-issue-2/help-along-way <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Valeria Flores</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/focus-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Focus on Learning</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/focus-learning/169-tutoringservicesrw.jpg?itok=ssS5qCoS"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/focus-learning/169-tutoringservicesrw.jpg?itok=ssS5qCoS" width="480" height="320" alt="Student Success Center at EMCC" title="Student Success Center at EMCC" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>“Help,” according to dictionary.com is defined as “to provide what is necessary to accomplish a task or satisfy a need.”  It is good to ask for help. At school, tutors are there to help you make your life that much easier.</p> <p>At Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC), tutoring comes in various forms and many subjects. There is tutoring for math, biology, writing, as well as chemistry and other subjects. For students Samantha Sunderland, Lacey Holstein, and Elaina Pettit, tutoring is an effective tool that they use whenever they need help.</p> <p>Samantha Sunderland is a 20-year-old college student. She said she goes to tutoring for math.<br /> “Well, actually, my boyfriend helps me almost every day so he is kind of like my personal tutor,” Sunderland said.</p> <p>Sunderland said that she always gains something when she goes to tutoring. If she could choose a personal tutor over a public tutor, she would pick a personal one.</p> <p>Elaina Pettit on the other hand, does not use the math success part of tutoring, but she uses the Writing Success Center to help her with her papers. She said that the class she has to write the most papers in is English.</p> <p>“The Writing Center has helped me with making my papers better and I realize what I do wrong with my writing. They also do not judge me when I go there and, therefore, I do not feel bad in seeking their help,” Pettit said.</p> <p>EMCC hosts up to 15,000 students annually. Not all students are always on campus, but when there are a lot of students present, the Writing Center can get set back.</p> <p>“Each time I have been to the Writing Center, they helped me right away, but I have heard of times where students wait a long time before being helped,” Pettit said.</p> <p>Tutors need to have advanced degrees in their area of expertise to be hired by the Success Center. “Each tutor that has helped me out has gotten straight to the problem of my paper and told me what I needed. The tutors also help me find what is wrong with my paper. They teach me in that sense,” Pettit concluded.</p> <p>Lacey Holstein has used tutoring for her chemistry class. “Tutoring has helped me understand some areas that I had trouble with,” Holstein said.</p> <p>The atmosphere that is created in all of the tutoring areas is one that is approachable. Being comfortable in an area is very important because it allows for a student to keep going back to it. “I do feel comfortable going there if I find myself in a tricky situation in class,” Holstein said.</p> <p>Being the tutor is completely different from being the person getting help. It takes a person with patience and good people skills as well as a good sense of knowledge to be able to do this. Tom Domek, tutor at the Writing Center, is the type of person who makes you feel comfortable while he helps you.</p> <p>“Helping the students get comfortable is important because it all depends on how you speak to people. I have worked with people before and it takes practice in how you talk to them. It is also easier to get the students to talk about what their context is about in the paper,” Domek said.</p> <p>That is not all. Domek has a journalism degree as well as being a published author and being a lecturer. Although tutoring is only a part-time job, Domek has a background that allows him to go into different paths. “I have a degree in journalism as well as in creative writing. I would want to become a full-time teacher at Estrella and the paths that I would be able to follow are because of my background is journalism, creative writing and literature,” he said.</p> <p>It seems that when you are a tutor, you have to worry about a lot of things. Not only do they have to worry about making the student comfortable in the subject that they are in but also do they have to help them understand what it is they were doing. Writing does not come easily to some people, but others have the gift of writing.</p> <p>“I always enjoyed writing and it felt natural. I have no anxiety when I write but when you help a student get less anxiety when writing, then that means that we have helped them,” Domek said.</p> <p>In comparison, Catherine Luse is a full-time tutor for the Writing Center. She does not want to teach classes and prefers the one-on-one tutoring. “There are different rules that apply to different paper types so it is almost like knowing a different range of subjects,” Luse said.</p> <p>There are different formats of papers that the Writing Success Center helps to edit, including the American Psychological Association (APA), Modern Language Association (MLA), American Chemical Society (ACS), and the Associated Press (AP) styles.</p> <p>Luse has been a tutor for five weeks. “When you tutor someone, you really understand the person and it is easier to help them,” Luse said.</p> <p>EMCC also has the online Writing Center. That is where the students can turn in their papers online and the tutors edit those papers. There is a downside to online editing though.</p> <p>“Online, we can’t spend a lot of time editing a paper. We have to give edits in a short amount of words so that the student can understand us in order to be clear about what needs to be done. When we do the one-on-one tutoring, we are allowed to give more feedback and if the students have a question, they can ask us,” Luse said.</p> <p>For some reason, sometimes students do not learn crucial things in high school. “Students are able to learn here and sometimes we teach them things that they didn’t know before. It makes classwork that much easier,” Luse said.</p> <p>Chelsey Peterson is an EMCC student. Peterson goes to the Writing Success Center. “I don’t go there very often, but when I have a big paper to write, I go there for help,” Peterson said.</p> <p>It takes practice to become good at something. “Personal tutors are a little more, well, personal, but school tutors seem to have a little more experience depending on the environment,” Peterson said.  “They help me improve my writing and how to think about structures I can use for my next work,” she added.</p> <p>The Writing Success Center is one of the few places that students can go to when they need help editing a paper but it is not the only resource that they have at their disposal. The Math Success and the Science Success Centers are available as well to help students with their homework.</p> <p>For more information, please go to <a href="http://www.estrellamountain.edu/students/tutoring" rel="nofollow">http://www.estrellamountain.edu/students/tutoring</a>.</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/active-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Active Learning</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/emcc-campus" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">EMCC Campus</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/learning-styles" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Learning Styles</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-achievement" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Achievement</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-challenges" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Challenges</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-engagement" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Engagement</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-support" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Support</a></div></div></div> Mon, 03 Mar 2014 20:16:00 +0000 ERIXL33951 169 at Women’s Job Prospects in Journalism /issues-higher-education/volume-2-issue-1/womens-job-prospects-journalism <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Jessica Stewart</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/higher-education" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Issues in Higher Education</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/issues-higher-education/136-womeninjournalism.jpg?itok=e-h2fcH1"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/issues-higher-education/136-womeninjournalism.jpg?itok=e-h2fcH1" width="480" height="319" alt="Broadcast Producer" title="Broadcast Producer" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>Today’s modern culture is that of change and growth in collective consciousness. With marriage rights for homosexuals a heated political argument, the demand for equality for people is front and center. In spite of greater social awareness, many still believe that the uneven balance between men and women is just as prevalent as ever.</p> <p>Is it true that my gender might play more of a role in my opportunity to succeed than my actual work ethic? I was recently accepted into Arizona State University Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication, where I intend to transfer in the fall of 2013 to pursue a career in broadcast journalism. During the next two years, I will be working hard to develop my skills as a journalist.</p> <p>I plan to have my bachelor’s degree by age 22 in 2015 and enter a workforce I’ve dreamed of being a part of since childhood. When making my decision to pursue this line of work, I understood it would be a challenging path wrought with deadlines, endless hours of research, and cutthroat competition, all of which I have decided that with hard work and resilience, I can overcome.</p> <p>But what if there is an obstacle in my way of which I have no ability to control or overcome? What if it’s my gender stands between me and realizing my dreams? In my chosen career path and for many others like me, women are a minority. Will our gender have more of an impact on our success than we would like to believe?</p> <p>Sociology professor Dr. Olga Tsoudis believes that even in today’s society, women are affected by outdated and unjust ways of thinking. She has personally felt the sting of sexism many times throughout her career, beginning with her high school guidance counselor who swore he would “eat his hat” if she got into an Ivy League school.</p> <p>After graduating from Cornell University, an Ivy League college, with a bachelor’s degree in Human Development and Family Studies, and then earning a doctorate in Sociology from the University of Arizona, Tsoudis began her first teaching position as the only female in the her department of Criminal Justice in Wayne State University.  She was often mistaken for a secretary to the male professors and even had students drop her class upon realizing she was in a position of power as the “professor.”</p> <p>Tsoudis warns about the economic adversity women face: “Economic justice is really important because that’s how people become independent. Today women make 77 cents to every dollar men make. If women do not have the same opportunities we’re really ruining, hurting, <em>impacting</em> their lives.” Her advice to any women seeking a place in the workforce is simple: “Negotiate your salary and benefits. Realize you are valuable.”</p> <p>Not only do women fall short monetarily when compared to men, but also in representation within journalism. According to a recent study, “The Byline Survey Report,” women are underrepresented in newspapers, making up only 40 percent of newspaper employees and writing only 20 percent of newspaper op-eds. When compared with data from the “2012 Status of Women in the U.S. Media Report,” which states 73 percent of journalism graduates over the last 10 years have been female, the numbers just don’t line up.</p> <p>The term “glass ceiling” is used to describe an invisible barrier preventing women and other minorities from advancing through upper rungs of executive ladders within corporate America no matter how qualified they may be.</p> <p>Maria Hasan, a student at EMCC believes she experienced a similar phenomenon at her job when she was assigned to train a male worker in her position and shortly after, he was promoted ahead of her.</p> <p>Hasan recently attended the “Smart Start” workshop offered during the second annual Women’s Conference, a Women’s History Month event.  The workshop provides female students and community members, tools to be successful in the workplace by addressing topics such as economic justice. “At the workshop I learned to investigate the pay rate and benefits of any position I apply for so I can bargain for the benefits I receive. I learned that it’s okay to talk about what I want financially and that it’s important to be confident.”</p> <p>Nicole Crites, news anchor on CBS 5 in Phoenix, believes that the newsroom today has evolved from the male favored institution it was years ago. “I think that men are actually at a disadvantage. In the valley, on-air women outnumber men and in my newsroom both the director and assistant director are female.”</p> <p>Before joining CBS 5 in 2004, Crites worked her way up from high school intern to weekend editor and reporter at KVOA. She then worked for the CBS news magazine “48 Hours” in New York City.</p> <p>Crites, who is award winning and Emmy nominated for breaking news and feature reports, believes that the glass ceiling is non-existent today. “Even when I was in college the highest paid people in the industry were strong females: Katie Couric and Oprah.”</p> <p>Crites believes salary in her industry is determined by credibility and time in the market, not sex. “Credibility creates viewership, the more you connect with your audience the more people will recognize you and that is what makes you valuable.</p> <p>For women joining this competitive field Crites’s advice is to be genuine. “If you’re looking to become successful, be humble, accept criticism, have a desire to learn, be willing to change, and be passionate about what you do.”</p> <p>While the glass ceiling resonates with a wide audience of women who share similar frustrations in being limited within the corporate equation, according to an article in The Harvard Business Review the term “labyrinth” might be more appropriate.</p> <p>The article titled “Women and the Labyrinth of Leadership” explores the idea that instead of there being an invisible barrier preventing women from reaching the top, there is a complex journey, riddled with barriers that can be overcome by women who are willing to work hard for their success.</p> <p>The article stresses the importance of understanding the obstacles that make up the labyrinth, such as prejudice, resistance to women’s leadership, leadership style issues, family demands and learning how to tackle them simultaneously to achieve success.</p> <p>It’s up to the women of today to pave the road for the women of tomorrow. We need to come together and make our voices heard. It is our responsibility to our future successors to address injustices in the workplace and demand change now. We have come a long way from the obvious gender prejudices of the past. Now it is time to correct the unfair limitations.</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-challenges" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Challenges</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/emcc-programs" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">EMCC Programs</a></div></div></div> Mon, 23 Sep 2013 18:57:19 +0000 MAN2026125 136 at