Lions Perspective - EMCC Classes /tags/emcc-classes en Not Just a Man’s World Anymore /issues-higher-education/volume-3-issue-1/not-just-mans-world-anymore <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Shea Huffman</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/higher-education" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Issues in Higher Education</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/issues-higher-education/194-nursing.jpg?itok=zJPmFdoJ"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/issues-higher-education/194-nursing.jpg?itok=zJPmFdoJ" width="480" height="320" alt="nursing" title="Nursing is still a field that is predominantly female today." /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>“A woman is the full circle. Within her is the power to create, nurture and transform,” author Diane Mariechild once stated, and her words could not be truer. Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC) celebrated Women’s History Month on March, 2014 I decided to interview two women in two different fields, one in nursing and the other one in film editing.</p> <p> Each can offer a different career outlook on the equality of men and women.  One has a career that is mainly female-dominated, and the other is entering a predominantly male-dominated career. I wanted to interview both of them because they are in two fields I am considering, and because I knew they would have different opinions on the subject of gender equality.</p> <p> Margaret Varner is a registered nurse on a medical surgical unit at Scottsdale Memorial Hospital. I chose Varner as my expert source because she has already completed her education, and is currently in the midst of her first years as a nurse. The road to her career was not an easy one; she had to earn an associate’s degree, pass state board certifications called “NCLEX” and complete a standardized statewide test.</p> <p> According to Varner, women are treated the exact same as men when it comes to nursing. “It is a very respected and trusted profession, consisting predominantly of women, so women have really promoted nursing as a profession,” she stated, confirming my assumptions that the career was mainly carried out by women.</p> <p> Varner explained that one-in-seven nurses are women, making that around an 85 percent rate. “In nursing, there really is no gender gap [when it comes to pay],” says Varner, “it is equal for both men and women. It is not really about gender, but rather the work one does. You get paid according to supply and demand, experience and credentialing. The amount of effort you put in, whether male or female, will match the salary you are paid.”</p> <p> Nursing used to be a stereotyped career, where people would look at you strange or roll their eyes if you said you wanted to be a nurse. It was just a woman’s job and nothing more.  However, that has changed in the past years, as more men have decided to join the profession.</p> <p> Varner is adamant about how much she appreciates being able to this job every day. “Nurses can really affect people, and they can make a huge difference in how a patient’s prognosis turns out. I wouldn’t want to be anything else.”<br /> Cassidy Tilden is an 18-year-old student at Arizona State University (ASU), attending college to pursue a film degree. She is aiming to be a video editor for either movies or television. Her career field, compared to Varner’s, is male-dominated.</p> <p>Tilden quietly admitted, “I feel a little intimidated by it. The males in my industry make me feel inferior compared to them; behaving as if they are automatically better than me. The work has to speak for itself, because a lot of people underestimate a woman in this field.”</p> <p> Women also earn less than men do in film editing, which is a discouraging prospect when entering the field.</p> <p>Although many women are beginning to stand up and squeeze their way into the career, many others are too afraid of being pushed to the side simply because they are female.</p> <p>Tilden stated, “I wouldn’t say I’m confident. But I definitely will not let it discourage me from working in the industry that I have a passion for. I will have to work twice as hard, but that’s okay. It just prompts me to be the best I can be and constantly improve.”</p> <p>I found this to be extremely uplifting. It gives women a more positive outlook on being independent and doing what their heart pulls them towards, instead of shying away from it.</p> <p>Despite the disadvantages Tilden faces in her career, she refuses to give up on what she has always dreamed of becoming. Her parting words were particularly moving: “Constantly challenge yourself. Be unique. Everyone wants to be the next Quentin Tarantino. What makes you different? Revel in the differences. Expand yourself and always be creative, and never give up on your dreams.”</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-engagement" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Engagement</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-challenges" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Challenges</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/students" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Students</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/emcc-classes" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">EMCC Classes</a></div></div></div> Tue, 04 Nov 2014 22:20:03 +0000 MARDH70971 194 at Options for Women Writers /issues-higher-education/volume-3-issue-1/options-women-writers <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Kayt Ludi</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/higher-education" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Issues in Higher Education</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/issues-higher-education/193-writer.jpg?itok=nhioE6qv"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/issues-higher-education/193-writer.jpg?itok=nhioE6qv" width="480" height="324" alt="freelance writer" title="Women Freelance Writers, photo: S. Jones" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>We all write on a daily basis. Whether it is an email, a Tweet, a paper for school, or an article for a magazine, we all write, maybe now more than ever. So, how does one move from being a person who writes to being a writer?</p> <p> Writers come in a myriad of variations. There are freelance writers, novelists, journalists, screenwriters, playwrights, technical writers, poets, and more. Being an English major, I know I want to find a way to make a living by writing, but what are my best options? Will being a woman have an effect on those options? And what really are my chances of making my dream a reality?</p> <p> Melody Warnick is a freelance writer who has been published in O: The Oprah Magazine, Redbook, Reader’s Digest, and Woman’s Day, just to name some publications. </p> <p> In a personal interview, Warnick explained, “I'd always imagined myself as a writer and did all the normal writerly things, like spending four years on the high school newspaper, majoring in English at college, and reading a ton. But it wasn't until after my first baby was born that I started looking at magazines and realizing that, hey, those were freelancers doing most of the stories, not people on staff.”</p> <p> Valeria Flores, a sophomore at Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC) plans to become a journalist. She described journalism as “such a competitive field.”  As Flores explained it, “You have to know a lot of different things in order to be a good journalist.”</p> <p> Working.com backs up this statement by saying, “Both print and broadcast reporters need detailed knowledge of the geography, history, economy, politics, media law and social life of the communities and countries in which they work. For writing critical reviews and analyses, they also need specialized knowledge in a particular area such as art or politics.”<br /> So how does a person get a foot in the door?</p> <p> Warnick got her start by sending an idea to a small local magazine. They paid her $0.10 a word. “I got paid a whopping $200!” Warnick said.</p> <p> However, it was a start she could build on; pitching ideas to successively bigger and better publications. According to Warnick, “It took me less than a year until I'd gotten my first assignment for a national magazine.” Now Warnick makes between $45,000 and $50,000 per year (pre-taxes). “But I'm definitely part-time,” she added.</p> <p> Flores did an internship at EMCC’s student magazine, The Lion’s Perspective, to get some more experience. She said she occasionally does research about job availability in journalism. She added, “Honestly, I am concerned,” referring to future job prospects in her chosen field. According to a Forbes article published in April of 2012, “Journalist came in fifth on the worst jobs list”, but the same article also cited a Georgetown University study which said “The unemployment rate for recent [journalism] college grads was 7.7 percent, a half a point below the national rate of 8.2 percent.”</p> <p> Has being a woman affected Warnick’s career? “In good and bad ways,” she said. “On the upside, I've written a lot for parenting and women's magazines over the years; being the target demographic and a regular reader of those magazines helped me pitch stories they wanted to publish. However, the downside, Warnick continued, “is that I sometimes lack confidence to pitch publications that I see as more male-centric, like, say, GQ or Outside. There ends up being a bit of a women's magazine ghetto where female writers get stuck.”</p> <p> Flores said she thinks being a woman will probably affect her career somehow, but she said she thinks being Hispanic is something that will have an even bigger impact. “Because I'm bilingual, it's going to help a lot.” stated Flores. “Instead of paying two people to do one job, they can have just one person.”</p> <p> Warnick would advise college students who want to become writers to “Think broadly. I've stuck largely with very traditional magazine writing, and that's probably to my detriment. The most successful freelance writers I know have learned to find work in all kinds of places: writing web content for a local business, writing catalog copy, writing white papers or brochures, writing educational content, writing marketing or ad copy, writing blog posts or books or speeches.”<br /> Warnick continued, “One of the hardest parts about starting out is that everyone wants to see samples of your work, but you’re just starting out and you don't have those samples. It's frustrating.</p> <p> If I were a current college student, I'd get an internship at a newspaper or magazine or work on the college paper—anything that lets me write and rack up a few published samples of my writing. The other alternative: start a blog. I think editors are more willing than ever to look at blog posts as samples of how you write.”</p> <p> Whichever sort of writer I end up becoming, the key, it seems, is to let my writing become its own foot in the door. Whether it is through a job, an internship, a blog, or even papers I’ve written for a class, all of them can be considered samples. The consensus seems to be to create and select your best samples, and then use them to demonstrate what you can do. So that is what I plan to do.<br />  </p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-engagement" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Engagement</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-support" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Support</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/carreers" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Carreers</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/emcc-classes" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">EMCC Classes</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/emcc-programs" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">EMCC Programs</a></div></div></div> Tue, 04 Nov 2014 22:17:02 +0000 MARDH70971 193 at Building Strong Communication Skills /focus-learning/volume-3-issue-1/building-strong-communication-skills <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Shea Huffman</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/focus-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Focus on Learning</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/focus-learning/188-patiositter.jpg?itok=EYn1OSs1"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/focus-learning/188-patiositter.jpg?itok=EYn1OSs1" width="480" height="373" alt="Valerie De La O" title="Communications Faculty Valerie De La O, photo: C. Chavez" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>Motivational teachers are the backbone to students’ success—they aid in paving the road for students’ career paths, and showing them the way when times get tough.</p> <p>All teachers have different styles of teaching - some are more visual teachers, while others prefer lectures. One teacher at Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC) has her own unique spin on teaching.</p> <p>Valerie De La O, a Communications professor, has her work cut out for her; she teaches interpersonal communication, public speaking, group communication and human communication. Many people have difficulty with these classes, since not everyone is an extroverted person. They may have trouble communicating with others, speaking in front of a crowd, or expressing their emotions in a healthy manner. De La O has dedicated her teaching career to helping students overcome these fears and helping them reach their full potential when it comes to communicating in the world.</p> <p>She takes a practical approach to teaching, basing it on application rather than strict lectures. From her own experiences in life, she has come to the conclusion that one retains more information from hands-on activities. She calls this her “method to the madness.”</p> <p>She said she is “constantly changing the mold to fit the students’ needs,” and likes to think outside the box, whether that be watching video clips on a certain subject or building a free-standing teepee out of raw noodles, string and a marshmallow to incorporate teamwork.</p> <p>De La O explained that she wants to build confidence and self-esteem in her students, so that they feel good about themselves to go out into the world and apply what they learned in her class. Job interviews, board meetings and public speeches are all examples of what she is preparing them for.</p> <p>According to De La O, the aspect of teaching that she enjoys the most is getting to meet everyone from different backgrounds, races, and even different points of view. She said that teaching is a learning experience, too—while the students learn from her, she in turn learns from them, and appreciates being able to have so many varying outlooks from different people. “It isn’t about the grade,” she stated, “It’s about leaving my class with the satisfaction of knowing you learned something new.”</p> <p>“She’s very energetic and passionate about her work,” one student in her Human Communications class, 18-year-old Dillion Burch, explained. Burch described how De La O is always lively and upbeat during class, and always tries to get everyone involved in the action.</p> <p>When asked if he would take another class taught by her, Burch agreed, saying she was an awesome teacher and saying he always enjoys class time when she is teaching. Burch is just one of the many students to praise De La O’s teaching methods and bubbly personality; but the amount of students she has excited about her classes is not surprising. “You can’t lead without followers,” said De La O, “We must all work together to accomplish something amazing.”<br />  </p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-achievement" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Achievement</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/emcc-classes" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">EMCC Classes</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/active-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Active Learning</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/employees" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Employees</a></div></div></div> Tue, 04 Nov 2014 22:00:17 +0000 MARDH70971 188 at Frank Hernandez: A Living Legend /profiles/volume-2-issue-2/frank-hernandez-living-legend <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Kayt Ludi</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/profile" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Profiles</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/profiles/173-frankhernandez.jpg?itok=7fmLE-3Y"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/profiles/173-frankhernandez.jpg?itok=7fmLE-3Y" width="480" height="271" alt="Political Science Instructor Frank Hernandez" title="Political Science Instructor Frank Hernandez" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>Frank Hernandez was born in Saginaw, Michigan during the 1930s. He experienced racism and discrimination first hand throughout his youth and young adulthood. He served in the US Air Force during the Korean War. He has attended, and taught at prestigious universities.</p> <p>Outside of teaching, he has also worked for the government in many different capacities over the years. He is a husband, father of three, and grandfather of two. And all of these things inform and enhance his teaching of Political Science at EMCC.</p> <p>Hernandez grew up and lived in what he describes as having been a fairly ethnically diverse community in Saginaw. During the '40s, however, the level of violence increased. Stabbings, shootings, drugs, prostitution were all on the rise. Police brutality was also rampant. According to Hernandez, “The police would stop us, and by us I mean Blacks and Latinos, for no reason at all. They would demand ID. They would throw us against the car, search us, and if you protested, they would take out the night stick and beat you up.”</p> <p>In trying to move out of the increasingly dangerous neighborhood in the '50s, Hernandez encountered what he describes as “severe discrimination.” He and his wife wanted to move their family to the safer environment of the West Side of Saginaw, but found that they were not entirely welcome. “Realtors would tell us that the house we were interested in was just sold when I gave them my last name.” Hernandez said.</p> <p>Some realtors were openly racist, telling Hernandez, “We don’t want any Mexicans on the West Side.” Fortunately, a friend with whom Hernandez was discussing his difficulties, invited Hernandez to come to church with him one Sunday. At the church the friend introduced Hernandez to one of his fellow parishioners – an Irish-Catholic realtor who knew a bit about discrimination himself. The Hernandez family moved to the West Side.</p> <p>Before he was married, Hernandez was briefly in the US Air Force during the '50s. He was stationed in Montgomery, Alabama just one year before Rosa Parks made history by refusing to give up her bus seat for a white passenger. When Hernandez, and a fellow Airman (an African-American from Detroit) attempted to ride a bus in Montgomery one day, the driver looked them both over and told Hernandez’s friend to go to the back of the bus. The friend protested that since he was in the military he shouldn’t have to go to the back of the bus, but the driver was unmoved. Hernandez suggested they get off the bus since, as he said to his friend, “We’re not in Detroit.”</p> <p>Out of the military, Hernandez went back to Michigan and attended Central Michigan University on the GI Bill. He received his bachelor's degree in Clinical Psychology. He worked as a substitute teacher at “a very tough” junior high school, then for the juvenile court system for about three years. Eventually he worked for the City of Saginaw as an adult probation officer and an assistant to the city manager. He was the Director of the City of Saginaw’s Work Relief program, and the city’s welfare budget – which his boss, the city manager, always sent Hernandez to explain/defend in front of the city council.</p> <p>The Hernandez family then decided to leave Michigan for the better weather of California. They moved 25 miles outside San Francisco, where Hernandez found work in adult probation, juvenile probation, and family court services. He also attended San Francisco State University where he earned a master's degree in Education. Hernandez got a second master's degree in Public Administration from USC. At USC he also did everything, but his dissertation for his doctorate focused on the area of Family Court Services – which included a research project about reducing the negative impact of divorce on children. He developed what was called the Child Custody Supervision Program, which created a corps of people able to respond to any and all child custody issues 24 hours a day. The program became the model for counties across Northern California.</p> <p>After retiring from working in government, Hernandez taught for about eight years in the Political Science Department at San Jose State, as well as in their MA in Public Administration Program. After that he taught about a year at San Francisco State in the Public Administration Department. Hernandez then moved to Arizona. He worked as a school counselor for the city of Tempe, and then taught Political Science for MCCCD campuses at Glendale, Paradise Valley and Estrella. He is in his 4th year now at EMCC.</p> <p>Andrea Beltran, who is currently taking POS110: American National Government from Hernandez, said, “I would definitely recommend Mr. Hernandez class.”  According to Beltran, “It is certainly an eye opener. How he goes about teaching us is something new to me. He uses the Socratic method of questioning, whether he notices this or not, I’m not sure, but it is very effective. He lets you draw your own conclusions.”</p> <p>Beltran, who is majoring in Journalism and Political Science, has long been very interested in politics. Though politics could be considered a very touchy subject, Beltran said that in the class, “Views, of course, do differ, but there is never real hostility, and everyone respects different views.” And when it comes down to whether or not Beltran feels that Hernandez’s life experiences add to his ability to teach Political Science effectively, Beltran said, “They really do. His experiences make up a lot of his lectures, and when he’s done questioning us and making us draw our own conclusions, he complements them with his own life experiences and stories that enrich his lessons like no other.”</p> <p>Hernandez is currently writing a book, which he hopes will be finished next year. The subject of the book will be the world economy, and it will be largely based on a paper he presented at an international conference in Mexico City in the '90s. During the current spring semester, Hernandez is teaching both POS 110 and 115 at EMCC.</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/employees" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Employees</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/emcc-classes" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">EMCC Classes</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/ethnicity" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Ethnicity</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/politics" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Politics</a></div></div></div> Mon, 03 Mar 2014 20:32:08 +0000 ERIXL33951 173 at HES100: Encouraging People to Care /focus-learning/volume-2-issue-2/hes100-encouraging-people-care <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Kaity Ford</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/focus-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Focus on Learning</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/focus-learning/170-annannhongii.jpg?itok=B_DWXiU1"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/focus-learning/170-annannhongii.jpg?itok=B_DWXiU1" width="480" height="320" alt="HES100 Instructor Annann Hong" title="HES100 Instructor Annann Hong" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>According to the Center for Disease Control, "Health is more than the absence of disease; it is a resource that allows people to realize their aspirations, satisfy their needs and to cope with the environment in order to live a long, productive, and fruitful life. In this sense, health enables social, economic and personal development fundamental to well-being."</p> <p>Well-being is a crucial part of our lives and in an effort to recognize the importance of student health, Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC) offers a course called Healthful Living 100.</p> <p>The EMCC class schedule describes Healthful Living 100 (HES100) as a class that explores current topics of interest such as stress management, fitness, alcohol and drug abuse, and relationships, and evaluates the risks associated with the modern lifestyle.</p> <p>Taught by Annann Hong, Ph.D., HES100 fulfills the General Education Requirement for Social and Behavioral Sciences and is used to satisfy various health related degrees at Arizona State University, Northern Arizona University, as well as the Personal Trainer Certificate offered at various Maricopa Community College campuses.</p> <p>HES100 is thoughtfully orchestrated around the eight dimensions of wellness. Represented as a wagon wheel, each dimension of wellness is a part of the whole, intertwining to create overall well-being. The eight factors that represent each wheel spoke are: physical, emotional, social, environmental, sexual, spiritual, occupational, and intellectual wellness.</p> <p>Expect to learn about nutrition and why a healthy diet is important. Hong likes to use peanut butter as a prime example, "Take peanut butter- a natural, healthy whole food. Somehow the norm has become Jiffy and Skippy; hydrogenated, processed, lacking nutrition. What happened?!"</p> <p>Among other things covered in the course are guidelines for healthy ways to fight diseases prevalent in our society today, how to protect yourself from sexually transmitted diseases, and how to squeeze in physical activity where least expected, like lunges while brushing one’s teeth.</p> <p>Although the district creates basic guidelines for the necessary material that needs to be covered in the course, Hong often goes beyond the minimum and tries to bring forth new ideas and staggering facts to her students.</p> <p>"One of the great things about being a professor here at Estrella is there's academic freedom; there are really no limits. I think what motivates me to cover the things I cover in class stems from my firsthand experiences as a health educator and the experiences of my students," she said. With each class Dr. Hong logs new stories from her students, learning about what students are facing today and passing along the knowledge to future classes.</p> <p>To make the course more personal, SMART Goals are created by each student at the beginning of the semester and worked on throughout. SMART (specific, measureable, attainable, relevant, time-bound) is the criteria which help guide in the setting of objectives. The point of SMART Goals is to help the student learn how to set attainable goals, create a plan to fulfill them, and evaluate ones progress and make changes where needed.</p> <p>Whether the goal is to walk for 30 minutes five times a week or stop drinking soda or even stick to building ones savings account, the project provides a strong guide for creating goals and proves the students capabilities.</p> <p>Speaking of goals, Hong has a few goals in mind for HES100. "Now that I have been here a while, one of the things I am hoping to do, that I would love to do, is build a curriculum around HES100. The problem right now is that HES100 sort of sits in a vacuum by itself. It meets the social behavioral requirements if you plan to transfer, but it doesn't really reside in the context of a program specifically within Estrella,” she said.</p> <p>Hong hopes to create an associate's or certificate program that would springboard off of HES100 and continue into the health education field, and would also like to see HES100 incorporated into other EMCC offerings, such as the healthcare programs through the SouthWest Skill Center.</p> <p>In general she would like to see health education grow on campus, with students becoming more health conscious and spreading the word. “There is something about the traditional college environment that breeds higher risk for health concerns and it has been a really interesting population to work with.”</p> <p>College students certainly do have a knack for honing unhealthy habits, considering their limited time and resources. But in the same light, they could hone healthy habits just as well, and this is where HES100 lends itself.</p> <p>Aside from the practical information provided in the course, there is something to be said for Hong’s unique teaching style that really sets this class apart from others. “She is so passionate about teaching; she goes into rants because she gets so excited. It’s funny,” said Briana De La Rosa, a student in Hong’s class.</p> <p>Hong’s spirit fills the room during class discussions, her passion so fiery she might burst, or pass out from not taking a breath. Not only is she entertaining, but her energy ignites a tiny flame within the student, infecting them with inspiration and awareness.</p> <p>“Just at a basic level, I don’t necessarily feel like students have to remember every little nugget of factual information that I pass on to them, but I think bringing awareness to the idea of personal health decisions having far wider reaching effects than we often consider, I think conceptually it can help each of us make different choices when we think about upping our accountability to each other, being a role model for other people, or being more observant of what others are going through. Really encouraging positive social health; encouraging people to care,” said Hong.</p> <p>De La Rosa says this class is helpful because “it makes you more aware of your body and you learn about yourself and how to build relationships.” She also said she would definitely recommend the class to other students because the environment allows you to freely express yourself and your ideas, which makes the class enjoyable rather than dreadful.</p> <p>Whether or not students are pursuing a health-related career field or just want to be healthier in their personal lives, HES100 offers something for everyone.</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/emcc-classes" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">EMCC Classes</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/employees" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Employees</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/healthy-living" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Healthy Living</a></div></div></div> Mon, 03 Mar 2014 20:17:59 +0000 ERIXL33951 170 at Hands On Learning /focus-learning/volume-2-issue-2/hands-learning <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Jennifer Zehrbach</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/focus-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Focus on Learning</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/focus-learning/168-journalism201.jpg?itok=bEHkUGXu"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/focus-learning/168-journalism201.jpg?itok=bEHkUGXu" width="480" height="320" alt="Journalism 201 students interviewing event organizers." title="Journalism 201 students interviewing event organizers." /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>Part of growing up comes from your education. You learn from your mistakes.  You also further your knowledge by attending school and learning from your parents or mentors. Teachers have been known to present boring dialog while thinking it will be automatically tattooed to the student's brain.</p> <p>At Estrella Mountain Community College, professors are encouraged to focus on teaching from various modes, including auditory, kinesthetic, and visually to help students to learn.</p> <p>Selina Schuh, a fourth year journalism teacher at Estrella Mountain, has her own techniques up her sleeve to get the creative juices flowing and inspire her students to learn.  Rather than lecturing, she engages students in the learning process. Some of her techniques include having the students go up to the board and write the answers to question that were asked during the class time.</p> <p>Another technique she uses in the classroom is to have the class sit in a circle to discuss the class assignment.  This technique allows all the students to converse back and forth with one another to give good feedback and advice for their upcoming articles. Students can find their own answers to questions, rather than being presented with them.</p> <p>In addition to learning the theory of journalism in the classroom, the class is asked to go out and interview individuals to get it to fully understand what it means to be a reporter. Students have to schedule interviews by themselves, make time in their schedule to meet the interviewees and then write the articles. This gets the students ready for the real world.</p> <p>Schuh's main subject is journalism for she was once a journalist. Schuh earned her degree in journalism at the University of Illinois. She has taught all grades levels, but seems to find passion in the college level education because the students are more mature and more responsible when it comes to participating in class and completing assignments. Her passion for teaching came about because she enjoys passing along her knowledge to those who are interested in learning.</p> <p>Teaching journalism also provides more flexibility than working in the field.  "As a journalist, you often have to be available at all kinds of hours, which is very exciting. However, it's not easy when you are raising a child." Her schedule at EMCC allows her to spend more time with her family.</p> <p>One student, Rosa Garcia, commented, that she really liked the atmosphere in the class because the class size was small. Garcia was interested in journalism as a potential career path. She took the class to open her mind to options on which route to take.</p> <p>Schuh's Journalism 201 was Garcia's first hybrid class.  This means that part of the class was completed online. Garcia stated that she liked the small classroom for it allowed Schuh to focus more on the students and she felt the instructor had a clear understanding of the topics, which helped Garcia to improve her learning.</p> <p>Ashairah Goodspeed was another student in the class. Her first thought was that Schuh gave a really good vibe.  She got straight to the point about the assignments they would be doing for the class. Goodspeed said she really enjoyed the time spent in the classroom and felt that she understood what was required to pass.</p> <p>Mrs. Schuh allows students to learn from all types of learning. To help visual learners she has segments where the students will watch videos to get a better understanding for the subject. For an auditory learning style, she has the students group together to have them listen to one another and provide support. For the kinesthetic learner, she has the students venturing out of the classroom to experience the life of a reporter and learn hands on.</p> <p>Teaching to all three learning styles provides every student to learn in their own way, which makes Schuh an excellent teacher.</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/active-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Active Learning</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/emcc-classes" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">EMCC Classes</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/learning-styles" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Learning Styles</a></div></div></div> Mon, 03 Mar 2014 20:11:49 +0000 ERIXL33951 168 at Lifelong Learning: The Key to Happiness /focus-learning/volume-2-issue-2/lifelong-learning-key-happiness <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Antonica Hernandez </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/focus-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Focus on Learning</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/focus-learning/167-johnfrasure.jpg?itok=Uc2ePpzn"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/focus-learning/167-johnfrasure.jpg?itok=Uc2ePpzn" width="480" height="320" alt="History Instructor John Frasure (right)" title="History Instructor John Frasure (right)" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>History classes are stereotyped to be boring and sometimes the teacher is as well; unless of course, you enroll in a history class with John Frasure at Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC).</p> <p>Passionate about history, Frasure’s excitement about obtaining knowledge is contagious.</p> <p>While most are still unsure of the career they want to pursue even as adults, Frasure claims he has known that he wanted to be a teacher ever since he can remember. Even as a young child in elementary school in Garrett, Kentucky, it interested him to learn about past history.</p> <p>He found it even more fascinating that history is a topic that you can always learn more about. Frasure views it as something that is constantly changing, and believes history that is in the making is merely something to learn from, so that the same mistakes are not continuously repeated.</p> <p>After high school, Frasure went on to study at Eastern Michigan University and later attended Texas Wesleyan University, and the University of Phoenix. He received his master’s degree and is planning on furthering his education even more in the near future.</p> <p>Frasure began his career as a history instructor in 1973 and is going on his 40th year of teaching. He has been educating students at EMCC for the past 19 years, 14 in which he has worked full time and five part time. Regardless of his status, the amount of effort put into his students and their learning is never anything less than above and beyond.</p> <p>Frasure’s teaching methods differ tremendously from those of other instructors - he doesn’t even use a textbook for the courses he offers. He apparently never used one textbook all throughout his four years at a university; he considers the truth to be found elsewhere.</p> <p>Everything that is taught in his classes is information that he has obtained through extensive research throughout the years. According to him, he has been researching history since before he entered college. He constantly learns something new every day, whether it be from books (he has about 3,000 in his collection), DVDS/documentaries, and even from students and colleagues who teach him things he didn’t know.</p> <p>“It’s always great to have someone come up and hand you a book, or come across a new documentary out of nowhere. It really makes me think, wow, I guess I’m supposed to be doing this after all.”</p> <p>Aside from not using textbooks for his students, he is a fan of collaborative work; he says he’s observed that students seem to comprehend information much better that way throughout his years as an instructor.</p> <p>EMCC student Michael Quiros said, “He’s really good at connecting the past to the present; it’s mind blowing. I think I’ve learned more taking this class than I have in any other history class.”</p> <p>John Frasure’s ultimate goal as an educator is to have his students walk away from his courses with more than just knowledge of history. He wants them to have an appreciation of it and to also apply all that they have learned not only in the classroom, but in life as well.</p> <p>“I want them to take knowledge, life lessons, and also a love for history and to know the benefit of it. I want them to be better citizens and make wise decisions- whatever that may be- voting, getting an education, whatever. Lifelong learning- that’s the key to happiness.”</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/emcc-classes" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">EMCC Classes</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/employees" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Employees</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/active-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Active Learning</a></div></div></div> Mon, 03 Mar 2014 20:09:28 +0000 ERIXL33951 167 at Teaching the Future /focus-learning/volume-2-issue-2/teaching-future <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Valeria Flores</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/focus-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Focus on Learning</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/focus-learning/166-johndonahue.jpg?itok=qra-g4kD"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/focus-learning/166-johndonahue.jpg?itok=qra-g4kD" width="480" height="320" alt="Economics Instructor John Donahue" title="Economics Instructor John Donahue" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>Educators are everywhere. Everyone has something to teach you. According to Merriam Webster’s online dictionary, an educator is someone who is “skilled in teaching.” As students we encounter teachers that change our outlook on life. We consider these teachers to be so good at what they do that we will recommend these teachers to anyone that is willing to take their class. A prime example of this kind of teacher is Estrella Mountain Community College’s (EMCC's) John Donahue, an economics teacher.</p> <p>Donahue has been an economics instructor for three years. He initially had wanted to be a teacher because his sister was going back to college. This inspired him to go back to school as well.</p> <p>"I love teaching and growing my students' understanding of the world. I have a passion for teaching because of the wonderful teachers I had in high school who all had a very positive influence on my life. I strive to give to my students what my teachers gave to me,” said Donahue.</p> <p>Donahue has an uncommon style of teaching. Instead of going to the book and completely repeating everything, he gives students an overview of the chapter in terms that are easy to understand and that students can relate to.</p> <p>“If someone doesn’t understand the topic, Mr. Donahue makes sure that they understand by slowing down the class.  He makes sure that you understand what he is teaching,” said Justin Thompson, a sophomore who is majoring in business.</p> <p>Economics is a tough subject to understand because of the terminology as well as the graphs. Macroeconomics does not necessarily have a lot of math, but it does have a few equations that are difficult to grasp.</p> <p>“I didn’t understand some graphs and when he tutored me, I understood them afterwards,” Caren Estrada, an EMCC freshman, said.</p> <p>Previous students know that when Donahue asks you about your day, he does mean it.</p> <p>“Mr. Donahue makes it known to that he wants to know everyone’s name. He memorizes everyone’s name and greets them when they come into class,” Thompson said.</p> <p>Donahue had the option of teaching in high school or college. However, Donahue chose to stay in the community college area.</p> <p>"I first thought that I wanted to teach high school when I began my career change to teach five years ago.  I soon realized that a good portion of high school students would prefer to be doing something else rather than sitting in an economics class!  I figured that I would have a much more focused and mature student body at Estrella and that I could have more influence there, than at the high school level.  I really enjoy teaching at my local community college.  I have had students that I know, or they know my wife, son, or daughter, in every class I have taught at Estrella.  I derive tremendous utility knowing and teaching my students and helping them understand how the world turns," Donahue said.</p> <p>In high school, it also depends on the teachers if they are going to be good at what they do.</p> <p>“In high school, I had an economics class and it was a six-week class. It was shorter, but I prefer Mr. Donahue’s passion for teaching. Whenever you ask him a question, you never feel uncomfortable,” Estrada said.</p> <p>Donahue is one of those teachers that captures your attention with the passion for his classes. He knows what he is doing and has an answer for a question that any of his students have.</p> <p>"I would like my students to have a better understanding of their environment and the world around them when they leave my class.  My goal is to prepare my students to be successful in life.  I always weave life lessons into my lesson plans and that is one of my favorite elements of teaching.  My wish is that my students realize that as they walk on down the trail of life, they should leave it better and nicer place than they found it," Donahue said.</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/emcc-classes" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">EMCC Classes</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/employees" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Employees</a></div></div></div> Mon, 03 Mar 2014 20:06:44 +0000 ERIXL33951 166 at A Closer Look at the Study of Psychology at EMCC /focus-learning/volume-2-issue-1/closer-look-study-psychology-emcc <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Lacey Holstein</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/focus-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Focus on Learning</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/focus-learning/126-psychology.jpg?itok=Z-PxEyeE"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/focus-learning/126-psychology.jpg?itok=Z-PxEyeE" width="319" height="480" alt="Psychology Studies at EMCC" title="Psychology Studies at EMCC" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>Today, psychology is a popular field of study. According to PrincetonReview.com, psychology ranked number two on its list of “Top 10 College Majors,” second only to Business Administration and Management/Commerce.</p> <p>Psychology is the applied, or cognitive, approach to studying mental functions and behaviors in an academic setting. In this field, some psychology majors may choose to conduct field research. Others decide to use their knowledge for the benefit of people around them by entering a clinical setting or having a private counseling practice.</p> <p>The number of psychology classes currently offered at EMCC, therefore, is extensive. With a growing number of new areas of research emerging, it is a must for students to be familiar with the basics first.</p> <p>For students who are either looking to meet General Studies requirements or to start out in a career of psychology, taking Introduction to Psychology (PSY101) is their first requirement. It offers a survey of the field and will help students who want to continue in psychology to determine which specific area they are interested in.</p> <p>“Unlike most subjects, psychology has become uniquely diverse,” said psychology student Paris Guzman, a student here at EMCC. “There are now a wide range of careers that you can choose from in this field.”</p> <p>To keep pace with these changes, EMCC offers classes such as “Psychology of Religion” and “Psychology and Culture.”</p> <p>Studying psychology at EMCC does not require students to learn theoretical information only. Guzman, who took <em>Introduction to Psychology</em> (PSY101) during the spring 2013 semester with Jean Norris-Bernal, recalls how this instructor would tell stories from her days as a therapist with a private practice, sharing real-life examples to illustrate psychological terms.</p> <p>“Ms. Bernal opened up a window for students because of her willingness to talk about her own experiences and encouraged us to voice our opinion on any psychological topic that intrigued us, even if it wasn’t directly mentioned in our textbook.”</p> <p>Norris-Bernal described her teaching approach this way, “With 20 years of clinical experience under my belt and a lifetime of family interaction, my life is an open book to my students so  they get a better understanding of those concepts that appear to be so complicated in their textbook.”</p> <p>For more information about studying psychology at EMCC, please visit the department website: <a href="http://www.estrellamountain.edu/programs/psychology" rel="nofollow">http://www.estrellamountain.edu/programs/psychology</a></p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/emcc-programs" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">EMCC Programs</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/emcc-classes" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">EMCC Classes</a></div></div></div> Mon, 23 Sep 2013 18:28:58 +0000 SELCB60601 126 at Alexander Andrews: Not A Typical Professor /focus-learning/volume-2-issue-1/alexander-andrews-not-typical-professor <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Jessica Stewart</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/focus-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Focus on Learning</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/focus-learning/123-img0890.jpg?itok=9a0N1QFl"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/focus-learning/123-img0890.jpg?itok=9a0N1QFl" width="480" height="300" alt="Movement and Meditation Practice During English Class" title="Movement and Meditation Practice During English Class" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>Imagine sitting in a room, eyes closed, and a soothing voice directing you to breathe slowly, to inhale through your nose and exhale through your mouth. A rhythm soundtrack plays gently in the background. With each inhale you grow more conscious, more aware; each exhale pushes your stresses and anxieties away. Slowly you open your eyes, stand up, and walk around the room. The dreamlike state you feel is reflected on the faces around you. The music changes, becomes more energetic. You feel awake. Where are you?</p> <p>If you guessed a yoga workshop—you’re wrong—though you might find similar practices there. This is how English faculty member, Alexander Andrews starts many of the classes he teaches at EMCC. Though his methods might be thought of as “unorthodox” by some, he is not without reason.</p> <p>In 2009 Andrews attended a session at the “Learning College Summit” entitled “Creating a Dynamic and Student Centered Learning Environment” where he learned the connection between mind and body.  The instructor integrated music and stretching to put the workshop attendees at ease, which was different from the traditional “get out your books and let’s begin” start that Andrews expected. He also learned about the value of keeping a fluidly moving, dynamic classroom by incorporating subtle changes, such as volume and tempo of music.</p> <p>“If the body stays dormant for too long, it actually starts to affect your thinking,” said Andrews. Realizing the benefits of music and movement to physically and cognitively stimulate students, Andrews found the exercises yielded results, were fun, and broke up the monotony of the conventional classroom.</p> <p>Former student, John Cox recalled learning from Andrews’ approach, “At first, the exercises seemed a little funny, but then I realized it was to wake us up. It was clear from the beginning that he’s passionate about what he’s doing, although his class was different from what I was used to. His high expectations helped me become a better writer and student in general.” Cox is one of many who embraced the classroom oddities. For those who felt uncomfortable, participation was encouraged, but opting out was okay too.</p> <p>Andrews’ focus is to create an interactive classroom with student centered classes and heavy emphasis on peer communication. Andrews finds it important to get students out of the classroom, and works with other instructors to integrate projects such as using paintings from art students as poetry prompts. Class trips to events around campus are not uncommon, as Andrews strives to develop his student’s social consciousness about culture and fosters global mindedness.</p> <p>If you are still unsure about taking a class with Andrews, it might be a good idea to check out his reviews on Ratemyprofessor.com. The website rates teachers on a scale from one to five in categories such as easiness, clarity, helpfulness, and overall quality. It relies solely on student feedback and includes comments from previous students. At the end of the spring semester of 2013, Andrews scored on the higher end with a 4.2 in overall quality and helpfulness and a 4.1 in clarity. Reflecting Cox’s previous statement of high expectations, students rate Andrews 2.5 on easiness.</p> <p>If you’re looking for a no-nonsense, straightforward, color-inside-the-lines class, steer clear of Professor Andrews.  However, if thinking outside the box and learning more than just course material appeals to you, check out one of the following classes he *teaches: English 101/102, African Americans in Film, Rap Literature, and American Indian Literature. These will challenge you academically <em>and</em> evolve you metaphysically. Yoga pants not required!</p> <p>*While Professor Andrews teaches all of these classes, the availability of each course varies per semester. Be sure to consult the EMCC class schedule for section availability. </p> <p> </p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/emcc-classes" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">EMCC Classes</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/employees" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Employees</a></div></div></div> Mon, 23 Sep 2013 18:16:11 +0000 SELCB60601 123 at