Lions Perspective - EMCC Programs /tags/emcc-programs en Social Workers Change Futures /editorials/volume-3-issue-1/social-workers-change-futures <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Ashley Osborne</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/editorial" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Editorials</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/editorials/206-socialworkii.jpg?itok=s8iFLunc"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/editorials/206-socialworkii.jpg?itok=s8iFLunc" width="480" height="359" alt="Social Work Program" title="Sociology Faculty Olga Tsoudis and Student Ashley Osborn Reaching Out to Students" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>When I decided to major in Social Work, I was already an established student at Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC). I found myself attending EMCC on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays while simultaneously attending Glendale Community College on Tuesdays and Thursdays for the required Social Work courses.</p> <p> After signing up for the E2 program, EMCC’s mentoring program, and meeting with my mentor, Sociology faculty, Dr. Olga Tsoudis, I decided to attend a Coffee Talk session and approach Dr. Ernie Lara, president of EMCC, about possibly starting a Social Work program at EMCC. He informed me that the courses were no longer offered because there did not seem to be a need for them. He agreed to consider offering the courses if I could provide proof that there are a number of students interested in Social Work.</p> <p> Fellow student Maria Moreno-Hasan assisted me in getting the word out and finding other students interested in Social Work. “Estrella Mountain is a welcoming campus that provides and equips students with what they need. That is why I attend this school, and why I wanted to be able to take the Social Work classes here” said Moreno-Hasan. With the help of professor Tsoudis, and several other faculty members and students, I was able to gather information on a number of students interested in Social Work.</p> <p> After a couple of months of reaching out to the students, I had a meeting with Dr. Pablo Landeros, Division Chair of Behavioral Sciences and Cultural Studies, Dr. Kathleen Iudicello, Interim Dean of Academic Affairs, Dr. Olga Tsoudis, Sociology Faculty, and Linda Cutright, Student Services Specialist: Academic Advisement and presented the information I had collected. Everyone agreed that there was a definite need for social workers in our community and a number of students interested in a Social Work major here at Estrella. As a result, this semester EMCC offers three different SWU classes.</p> <p> Social Work instructor, Stacy Moreno, said “Throughout this semester in Intro to Social Work, we explored just how broad social work really is as a field, the increasing number of job opportunities that are available, and the real impact we can have, positively, in the life of others; our families, our communities, our society, and in the world. Social workers think globally and act locally. Come explore with us and make change happen!”</p> <p> Starting this fall, EMCC offers the required Social Work courses that are needed to transfer to the Bachelor of Social Work program at Arizona State University.</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/carreers" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Carreers</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/cost-education" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Cost of Education</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/emcc-programs" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">EMCC Programs</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-engagement" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Engagement</a></div></div></div> Thu, 06 Nov 2014 21:42:28 +0000 SELCB60601 206 at Options for Women Writers /issues-higher-education/volume-3-issue-1/options-women-writers <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Kayt Ludi</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/higher-education" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Issues in Higher Education</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/issues-higher-education/193-writer.jpg?itok=nhioE6qv"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/issues-higher-education/193-writer.jpg?itok=nhioE6qv" width="480" height="324" alt="freelance writer" title="Women Freelance Writers, photo: S. Jones" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>We all write on a daily basis. Whether it is an email, a Tweet, a paper for school, or an article for a magazine, we all write, maybe now more than ever. So, how does one move from being a person who writes to being a writer?</p> <p> Writers come in a myriad of variations. There are freelance writers, novelists, journalists, screenwriters, playwrights, technical writers, poets, and more. Being an English major, I know I want to find a way to make a living by writing, but what are my best options? Will being a woman have an effect on those options? And what really are my chances of making my dream a reality?</p> <p> Melody Warnick is a freelance writer who has been published in O: The Oprah Magazine, Redbook, Reader’s Digest, and Woman’s Day, just to name some publications. </p> <p> In a personal interview, Warnick explained, “I'd always imagined myself as a writer and did all the normal writerly things, like spending four years on the high school newspaper, majoring in English at college, and reading a ton. But it wasn't until after my first baby was born that I started looking at magazines and realizing that, hey, those were freelancers doing most of the stories, not people on staff.”</p> <p> Valeria Flores, a sophomore at Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC) plans to become a journalist. She described journalism as “such a competitive field.”  As Flores explained it, “You have to know a lot of different things in order to be a good journalist.”</p> <p> Working.com backs up this statement by saying, “Both print and broadcast reporters need detailed knowledge of the geography, history, economy, politics, media law and social life of the communities and countries in which they work. For writing critical reviews and analyses, they also need specialized knowledge in a particular area such as art or politics.”<br /> So how does a person get a foot in the door?</p> <p> Warnick got her start by sending an idea to a small local magazine. They paid her $0.10 a word. “I got paid a whopping $200!” Warnick said.</p> <p> However, it was a start she could build on; pitching ideas to successively bigger and better publications. According to Warnick, “It took me less than a year until I'd gotten my first assignment for a national magazine.” Now Warnick makes between $45,000 and $50,000 per year (pre-taxes). “But I'm definitely part-time,” she added.</p> <p> Flores did an internship at EMCC’s student magazine, The Lion’s Perspective, to get some more experience. She said she occasionally does research about job availability in journalism. She added, “Honestly, I am concerned,” referring to future job prospects in her chosen field. According to a Forbes article published in April of 2012, “Journalist came in fifth on the worst jobs list”, but the same article also cited a Georgetown University study which said “The unemployment rate for recent [journalism] college grads was 7.7 percent, a half a point below the national rate of 8.2 percent.”</p> <p> Has being a woman affected Warnick’s career? “In good and bad ways,” she said. “On the upside, I've written a lot for parenting and women's magazines over the years; being the target demographic and a regular reader of those magazines helped me pitch stories they wanted to publish. However, the downside, Warnick continued, “is that I sometimes lack confidence to pitch publications that I see as more male-centric, like, say, GQ or Outside. There ends up being a bit of a women's magazine ghetto where female writers get stuck.”</p> <p> Flores said she thinks being a woman will probably affect her career somehow, but she said she thinks being Hispanic is something that will have an even bigger impact. “Because I'm bilingual, it's going to help a lot.” stated Flores. “Instead of paying two people to do one job, they can have just one person.”</p> <p> Warnick would advise college students who want to become writers to “Think broadly. I've stuck largely with very traditional magazine writing, and that's probably to my detriment. The most successful freelance writers I know have learned to find work in all kinds of places: writing web content for a local business, writing catalog copy, writing white papers or brochures, writing educational content, writing marketing or ad copy, writing blog posts or books or speeches.”<br /> Warnick continued, “One of the hardest parts about starting out is that everyone wants to see samples of your work, but you’re just starting out and you don't have those samples. It's frustrating.</p> <p> If I were a current college student, I'd get an internship at a newspaper or magazine or work on the college paper—anything that lets me write and rack up a few published samples of my writing. The other alternative: start a blog. I think editors are more willing than ever to look at blog posts as samples of how you write.”</p> <p> Whichever sort of writer I end up becoming, the key, it seems, is to let my writing become its own foot in the door. Whether it is through a job, an internship, a blog, or even papers I’ve written for a class, all of them can be considered samples. The consensus seems to be to create and select your best samples, and then use them to demonstrate what you can do. So that is what I plan to do.<br />  </p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-engagement" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Engagement</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-support" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Support</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/carreers" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Carreers</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/emcc-classes" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">EMCC Classes</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/emcc-programs" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">EMCC Programs</a></div></div></div> Tue, 04 Nov 2014 22:17:02 +0000 MARDH70971 193 at Student Success Fair at EMCC /campus-life/volume-3-issue-1/student-success-fair-emcc <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Ernesto Oliva </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/campus-life" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Campus Life</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/campus-life/186-studentsuccessfair.jpg?itok=2mL0qzI5"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/campus-life/186-studentsuccessfair.jpg?itok=2mL0qzI5" width="480" height="320" alt="Student Success Fair" title="EMCC&#039;s Student Success Fair" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>“It is the perfect weather to be out here today! So many great opportunities and a positive vibe,” said student Analise Soto at the Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC) Student Success Fair held this past March.</p> <p>The purpose of the fair, according to Christina Izaguirre, one of the organizers, is “to celebrate students’ success and help them achieve their personal and academic goals.” “Overall, I am excited to see the constant flow of interaction between students, faculty and staff here at the Student Success Fair,” said Izaguirre. Students received a tri-fold graduation passport that encouraged them to learn about their campus and resources while knowing how to prepare for their individual graduation date.</p> <p>The passport cover contained room for a date, which the students filled out after they visited the zones and determined their graduation date. The passport also contained a map of the campus and key zones the students needed to visit for their passport stamps. There were four zones, which consisted of the green enroll zone, blue discover zone, red learn zone, and purple lead zone. The passport was completed with a black stamp when students took a picture with Rory, the school’s mascot.  </p> <p>Once students completed their graduation passport they received a free EMCC T-shirt that could be personalized with their graduation date. In addition, the fair gave students the opportunity to learn more about the different clubs and organizations at EMCC. “The students who opened up to me about their goals in life were really amazing. It felt like I was making a difference in their lives,” said Ursula Jackson from the Culinary Club.   </p> <p>Jackson shared the story on how she found her calling in culinary arts and wanted to do the same for others. By sharing her story with students, she felt it would inspire them to seek opportunities for themselves. Another highlight for many students was all of the food being handed out. “I think it is really neat that EMCC is offering all of this free food. I mean, who doesn’t love free food?” said student Sam Roybal. Roybal explained that she previously attended Glendale Community College and was surprised at how EMCC showed so much care for their students.  “I feel proud and privileged to attend EMCC because the school puts on so many events to help me with my educational goals”.</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-achievement" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Achievement</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-support" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Support</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/campus-event" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Campus Event</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/emcc-campus" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">EMCC Campus</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/emcc-programs" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">EMCC Programs</a></div></div></div> Tue, 04 Nov 2014 21:44:57 +0000 MARDH70971 186 at Why High School Students Should Consider AAEC High School /beyond-campus/volume-2-issue-2/why-high-school-students-should-consider-aaec-high-school <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Katelyn Wiley</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/beyond-campus" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Beyond Campus</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/beyond-campus/180-aaec.jpg?itok=O472qIsz"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/beyond-campus/180-aaec.jpg?itok=O472qIsz" width="480" height="360" alt="AAEC High School" title="AAEC High School" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>Ten years ago, without a high school diploma finding work was difficult. Fast forward to 2014 and even <em>with</em> a college degree, finding work is a challenge.</p> <p>As of 2012, the percentage of people unemployed with an associate’s degree is 6.2, only 2.1 percent fewer than those with just a high school diploma, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics Data. Although the unemployment rate is on its way to recovery, the rate is still at one of its highest. Given that people are holding off from retiring or coming back from being retired, the struggle to find a job is at an all-time high.</p> <p>People are now aware of the struggle and have tackled this new situation several different ways, like trying to stay at the top of their class or putting aside their dream careers to pursue ones that seem more in reach. Others are looking for alternatives in high school.</p> <p>The Arizona Agribusiness and Equine Center (AAEC) High School is a program founded in 1997 that allows students to attend high school and college at the same time. The school's mission is described on its website as “[preparing] young adults for excellence in academics, social responsibility and lifelong learning.” AAEC High School is a public charter school and classes taken at the high school and at the college are paid for by the school and are free for students to attend. The only time a student has to pay for a class is if the student wishes to attend more classes at the college then required.</p> <p>The students that go through this school end up not only graduating with a high school diploma but also an associate’s degree. Dr. Mona Ramirez, the Principal at AAEC High School stated, “The great thing about AAEC is that it offers students the opportunity to earn a high school diploma while concurrently earning college credit toward an associate's degree.”</p> <p>This is one of the main deciding factors for students who choose to attend AAEC High School instead of normal high school. Getting an associate’s degree when they graduate will put them two years ahead of other high school students their age.</p> <p>Another reason why students decide to transfer to or attend AAEC High School is because of the learning environment. “At AAEC High School we stay true to our word when we say you will be taught in a better learning environment by keeping the classes small. Most high schools classes can go anywhere from 35 to 42 students, while at AAEC High School we keep our class to around 28 students,” Dr. Ramirez said.</p> <p>Even though college classes may vary in size, having such a small high school classroom environment makes a difference for the few classes students take on the AAEC high school campus. Some things that discourage students to attend AAEC High School is the fear of lacking a true high school experience, but AAEC High School does its best to make sure this does not happen by offering clubs, activities, and even holding prom at the end of the year.</p> <p>Maddy Taylor, a junior at AAEC High School, decided to start attending AAEC High School her second semester of her freshman year. “I decided to switch schools because I wanted to get a better education and graduate with an associate's degree.” She added, “The main reason why I originally didn’t go to AAEC High School was because I wanted to play sports, but then I found out that you can still try out and participate in high school sports at Millennium while going to AAEC High School, so I decided to make the switch as soon as I could.”</p> <p>If students do decide to attend AAEC High School, the next step for them to do is choose a program. They have seven different programs to start off their college career. The programs they offer are academics, engineering, equine studies, homeland security, international business, math and science, and last but not least, veterinary and medical.</p> <p>Each different program helps form a path into a desired career. For example, if someone chooses the engineering course, that person will be given classes to take to help receive an Associate of Science. Along with this, the program itself has formed plans and connections in the engineering field and each individual will be given guidance on planning the perfect path for that person to take. Not only does AAEC High School allow students to choose a program but they also have the choice of location. The AAEC High School program feeds into five colleges, one of them being Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC).<br /> .<br /> Once students have decided which campus they want to attend and what program they plan on attending, they are set to begin their learning career as AAEC High School student. “At first it was confusing having to go to the college and find classes on the campus but after I got used to everything, it became as normal as switching buildings at the high school campus during my morning classes there” Taylor stated.</p> <p>One benefit about AAEC High School is that they do not have a cutoff grade as to when students can transfer in. “You can start to attend AAEC as a freshman or you can transfer in your sophomore, junior, or even senior year.” Dr. Ramirez said. She then went on to explain that the only thing bad about joining AAEC High School late is that students may not get all the credits they need to graduate with an associate's degree. However, she says not to make that the reason not to transfer. Students who decide to transfer as late as their senior year will still be attending college and will still be leaving high school with some college credits, which will help them get their foot in the door for college in the future.</p> <p>To some students and parents the idea of going to college at such a young age might seem a bit scary but there are always people and friends there to help them along the way. “When I started at AAEC and was only 14 years old, I thought the 18 and 20 year old students would treat me different because they could notice the age gap, but it wasn’t as bad as I thought and I did feel very welcome” Gage Mikos, an AAEC student stated.</p> <p>All information needed to start attending Arizona Agribusiness &amp; Equine Center (AAEC) High School can be found on its website at <a href="http://www.aaechighschools.com" rel="nofollow">www.aaechighschools.com</a> or by phone at (602) 297 8500.</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/cost-education" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Cost of Education</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/education" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Education</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/emcc-programs" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">EMCC Programs</a></div></div></div> Mon, 03 Mar 2014 20:53:17 +0000 ERIXL33951 180 at How the Honors Program Honors its Students /focus-learning/volume-2-issue-2/how-honors-program-honors-its-students <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Eva Ziegler</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/focus-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Focus on Learning</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/focus-learning/171-hvillalpandohonors.png?itok=h_Xh0SJf"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/focus-learning/171-hvillalpandohonors.png?itok=h_Xh0SJf" width="431" height="452" alt="Honors Student Villalpando" title="Honors Student Villalpando" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>All students, upon enrolling in Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC), have had to take that nerve-wracking test that determines what level of classes they are assigned. One student, Hyacinth Villalpando, still remembers that day she took the EMCC placement test.</p> <p>Walking into that dim room with its tiny computers, she did not have the highest expectations, except to make classes at the one hundred level. However, to her surprise, that was the day she discovered that she had made it into Honors.</p> <p>Villalpando says, “I remember thinking, why would I want to be in Honors? It just sounds like more unnecessary work than college has to be.” To her surprise, the Honors Program offered her things such as a loving staff, scholarships, events and a taste of the culture of competition - this year's Honors study topic.</p> <p>In fact, a lot of students have this same negative view at first. When given the prospect of joining the Honors Program, many students might automatically assume that it means lengthy homework, difficult classes and strict teachers. Those same students would be correct, but not in the way that they think. Villalpando herself used to be one of those skeptical students. However, being in the Honors Program has changed her mind completely.</p> <p>She said, “Yes, the Honors Program gives lengthy work because it is made to challenge the students. The classes are difficult, but only to prepare students for their future. Finally, while the instructors may be strict, they are the most caring and encouraging people I have ever encountered.”</p> <p>Besides these benefits, the Honors Program offers many rewards students are unaware of. So what exactly are those perks and how can students gain access to the program?</p> <p>The first pathway into the program is the Presidents’ Scholarship, which can be obtained by either testing into Honors, or by being in the top 15 percent of one’s high school graduating class and receiving high placement test scores. This two-year scholarship covers tuition for up to 15 credits every semester.</p> <p>However, students who have not met these qualifications should not fret. There is also the Honors Achievement Award given to current EMCC students. Students who obtain a cumulative G.P.A of a 3.25 qualify for this scholarship and are rewarded at the end of every semester for their hard work. Even if students do not qualify for Honors at enrollment, they are still presented with an opportunity to join every semester.</p> <p>Villalpando says, “Not only is the program helping me to adjust to a more challenging learning experience to prepare me for a university, but it’s ensuring that it’s more affordable and possible.”</p> <p>Having tuition covered is just one of several pluses. Alexander Andrews, Honors Program Director, went over some of the other Honors Program goodies. Andrews said, "Being a part of the Honors Program enables students to maximize their academic success.  Students who graduate with Honors or Honors Distinction are more likely to receive future scholarships at the University level."</p> <p>In fact, upon admittance to Honors, students are automatically invited to join Phi Theta Kappa. Phi Theta Kappa is the international Honor society of two-year colleges and academic programs. It offers scholarships for several Arizona universities including University of Arizona, Arizona State University, and Northern Arizona University. Phi Theta Kappa also offers an entire website that allows students to search and apply for multiple scholarships and being an Honors student gives them an edge for each one.</p> <p>Andrews says, “Along with scholarships, Honors makes students more eligible for internships and future jobs.” There are even specific scholarships that students can only get if they are in Honors. Andrews says, “Students prove to be hardworking and dedicated in their professional life if they mention that they are in Honors."</p> <p>Honors graduates are actually more likely to obtain a higher paying job. In a statistical study done by Arizona State University, researchers found that students who graduated in Honors with a G.P.A of 3.5 or higher, received a higher annual salary overall than those who did not. Students can also present scholarly research at the Honors Expo every Fall semester.</p> <p>When students are not in an Honors only cohort class, they must complete an Honors project and this is what they present. If a student's presentation ranks in the top categories, students are able to attend the Western Regional Honors Conference, which builds confidence and helps develop leadership skills.</p> <p>This event is also favorable to University Honors programs for students planning to transfer. It is also another way that the program is always looking to help their students achieve more because it allows students to put on display the hard work they have been striving for, regardless if they win or not.</p> <p>Andrews said, “In a way, we are building a community for the students. There are exclusive things that they get to go to, such as the symphony. They learn to be in a group together and obtain a better global perspective.” Villalpando herself raved about the symphony.</p> <p>She said, “I just recently went to the symphony. It was a beautiful experience that I did not expect. I think it’s something that everyone would enjoy, if given the chance. The Honors office gives me the tickets for free so I will definitely be going again!”</p> <p>Besides listening to the soothing music of the symphony, students can attend the Honors Forum lectures. These lectures always have an inspirational message to offer and are an intellectually stimulating experience for the students. At this year’s forum, Dr. Luis Fernandez gave a speech about the ideologies of a free market, while bestselling author Victor Villasenor gave a speech about dedication to family, education, and the harmony of the written word.</p> <p>The teachers in the program also revel in their jobs and find it rewarding to teach the Honors students. When asked why she enjoyed teaching Honors, Communications teacher Roselyn Turner said, "I love teaching Honors because students come with highly responsible behavior.  I like to build on that foundation for future opportunities such as Service Learning projects, and encourage and support the students."</p> <p>Because staff members like Turner enjoy the experience, it makes the classes all the more enjoyable for the students. In fact, in a study conducted by Palm Beach State University, they found that on average, Honors professors rated a 4.28 for overall quality and helpfulness while normal professors rated a 3.57.</p> <p>Turner teaches some of the Honors Only cohort classes. These classes consist entirely of Honors students. While the classes may seem intimidating at first, they actually do not contain as much rigorous work as students fear.</p> <p>Turner says of the classes, "Yes, there is a lot of work.  The work is not necessarily more difficult, it is just different.  It's not about writing a longer paper, but a more advanced paper or speech.  It's about the content that reflects their learning from the Service Learning project." Turner is just one of the many teachers in the Honors program at EMCC. However, it seems as if every staff member involved wants to keep Honors students on the right track.</p> <p>Sitting in the waiting room in the Honors office, one can find many encouraging posters and pictures of Honors students' achievements and essays framed for their excellence. Colorful encouragements serve as a reminder to students that they are the ones setting their limits.</p> <p>Turner says, "The Honors personnel are good people.  They keep close tabs on each student because they want every student to be successful."</p> <p>It seemed as if Villalpando had the same view, “Felipa is perhaps the most helpful person I have ever encountered while on campus. Alex is very organized and always willing to help and encourage me.”</p> <p>This year’s theme of the Honors Program is The Culture of Competition. The idea of this theme is that students will recognize what it means to be competitive. It doesn’t mean that they race to the top of the chart, or beat the other student’s grade point averages, but it is what they do to challenge themselves. Only when students are achieving their own personal goals, do they become a part of the competitive culture. This is why the Honors Program encourages students not to be afraid.</p> <p>Joining might be scary and intimidating, but to stand up to this fear and go beyond expectations is what makes a true Honors student.</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-achievement" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Achievement</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-engagement" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Engagement</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-support" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Support</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/emcc-programs" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">EMCC Programs</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/honors" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Honors</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/music" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Music</a></div></div></div> Mon, 03 Mar 2014 20:26:00 +0000 ERIXL33951 171 at Women’s Job Prospects in Journalism /issues-higher-education/volume-2-issue-1/womens-job-prospects-journalism <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Jessica Stewart</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/higher-education" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Issues in Higher Education</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/issues-higher-education/136-womeninjournalism.jpg?itok=e-h2fcH1"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/issues-higher-education/136-womeninjournalism.jpg?itok=e-h2fcH1" width="480" height="319" alt="Broadcast Producer" title="Broadcast Producer" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>Today’s modern culture is that of change and growth in collective consciousness. With marriage rights for homosexuals a heated political argument, the demand for equality for people is front and center. In spite of greater social awareness, many still believe that the uneven balance between men and women is just as prevalent as ever.</p> <p>Is it true that my gender might play more of a role in my opportunity to succeed than my actual work ethic? I was recently accepted into Arizona State University Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication, where I intend to transfer in the fall of 2013 to pursue a career in broadcast journalism. During the next two years, I will be working hard to develop my skills as a journalist.</p> <p>I plan to have my bachelor’s degree by age 22 in 2015 and enter a workforce I’ve dreamed of being a part of since childhood. When making my decision to pursue this line of work, I understood it would be a challenging path wrought with deadlines, endless hours of research, and cutthroat competition, all of which I have decided that with hard work and resilience, I can overcome.</p> <p>But what if there is an obstacle in my way of which I have no ability to control or overcome? What if it’s my gender stands between me and realizing my dreams? In my chosen career path and for many others like me, women are a minority. Will our gender have more of an impact on our success than we would like to believe?</p> <p>Sociology professor Dr. Olga Tsoudis believes that even in today’s society, women are affected by outdated and unjust ways of thinking. She has personally felt the sting of sexism many times throughout her career, beginning with her high school guidance counselor who swore he would “eat his hat” if she got into an Ivy League school.</p> <p>After graduating from Cornell University, an Ivy League college, with a bachelor’s degree in Human Development and Family Studies, and then earning a doctorate in Sociology from the University of Arizona, Tsoudis began her first teaching position as the only female in the her department of Criminal Justice in Wayne State University.  She was often mistaken for a secretary to the male professors and even had students drop her class upon realizing she was in a position of power as the “professor.”</p> <p>Tsoudis warns about the economic adversity women face: “Economic justice is really important because that’s how people become independent. Today women make 77 cents to every dollar men make. If women do not have the same opportunities we’re really ruining, hurting, <em>impacting</em> their lives.” Her advice to any women seeking a place in the workforce is simple: “Negotiate your salary and benefits. Realize you are valuable.”</p> <p>Not only do women fall short monetarily when compared to men, but also in representation within journalism. According to a recent study, “The Byline Survey Report,” women are underrepresented in newspapers, making up only 40 percent of newspaper employees and writing only 20 percent of newspaper op-eds. When compared with data from the “2012 Status of Women in the U.S. Media Report,” which states 73 percent of journalism graduates over the last 10 years have been female, the numbers just don’t line up.</p> <p>The term “glass ceiling” is used to describe an invisible barrier preventing women and other minorities from advancing through upper rungs of executive ladders within corporate America no matter how qualified they may be.</p> <p>Maria Hasan, a student at EMCC believes she experienced a similar phenomenon at her job when she was assigned to train a male worker in her position and shortly after, he was promoted ahead of her.</p> <p>Hasan recently attended the “Smart Start” workshop offered during the second annual Women’s Conference, a Women’s History Month event.  The workshop provides female students and community members, tools to be successful in the workplace by addressing topics such as economic justice. “At the workshop I learned to investigate the pay rate and benefits of any position I apply for so I can bargain for the benefits I receive. I learned that it’s okay to talk about what I want financially and that it’s important to be confident.”</p> <p>Nicole Crites, news anchor on CBS 5 in Phoenix, believes that the newsroom today has evolved from the male favored institution it was years ago. “I think that men are actually at a disadvantage. In the valley, on-air women outnumber men and in my newsroom both the director and assistant director are female.”</p> <p>Before joining CBS 5 in 2004, Crites worked her way up from high school intern to weekend editor and reporter at KVOA. She then worked for the CBS news magazine “48 Hours” in New York City.</p> <p>Crites, who is award winning and Emmy nominated for breaking news and feature reports, believes that the glass ceiling is non-existent today. “Even when I was in college the highest paid people in the industry were strong females: Katie Couric and Oprah.”</p> <p>Crites believes salary in her industry is determined by credibility and time in the market, not sex. “Credibility creates viewership, the more you connect with your audience the more people will recognize you and that is what makes you valuable.</p> <p>For women joining this competitive field Crites’s advice is to be genuine. “If you’re looking to become successful, be humble, accept criticism, have a desire to learn, be willing to change, and be passionate about what you do.”</p> <p>While the glass ceiling resonates with a wide audience of women who share similar frustrations in being limited within the corporate equation, according to an article in The Harvard Business Review the term “labyrinth” might be more appropriate.</p> <p>The article titled “Women and the Labyrinth of Leadership” explores the idea that instead of there being an invisible barrier preventing women from reaching the top, there is a complex journey, riddled with barriers that can be overcome by women who are willing to work hard for their success.</p> <p>The article stresses the importance of understanding the obstacles that make up the labyrinth, such as prejudice, resistance to women’s leadership, leadership style issues, family demands and learning how to tackle them simultaneously to achieve success.</p> <p>It’s up to the women of today to pave the road for the women of tomorrow. We need to come together and make our voices heard. It is our responsibility to our future successors to address injustices in the workplace and demand change now. We have come a long way from the obvious gender prejudices of the past. Now it is time to correct the unfair limitations.</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-challenges" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Challenges</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/emcc-programs" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">EMCC Programs</a></div></div></div> Mon, 23 Sep 2013 18:57:19 +0000 MAN2026125 136 at A Closer Look at the Study of Psychology at EMCC /focus-learning/volume-2-issue-1/closer-look-study-psychology-emcc <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Lacey Holstein</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/focus-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Focus on Learning</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/focus-learning/126-psychology.jpg?itok=Z-PxEyeE"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/focus-learning/126-psychology.jpg?itok=Z-PxEyeE" width="319" height="480" alt="Psychology Studies at EMCC" title="Psychology Studies at EMCC" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>Today, psychology is a popular field of study. According to PrincetonReview.com, psychology ranked number two on its list of “Top 10 College Majors,” second only to Business Administration and Management/Commerce.</p> <p>Psychology is the applied, or cognitive, approach to studying mental functions and behaviors in an academic setting. In this field, some psychology majors may choose to conduct field research. Others decide to use their knowledge for the benefit of people around them by entering a clinical setting or having a private counseling practice.</p> <p>The number of psychology classes currently offered at EMCC, therefore, is extensive. With a growing number of new areas of research emerging, it is a must for students to be familiar with the basics first.</p> <p>For students who are either looking to meet General Studies requirements or to start out in a career of psychology, taking Introduction to Psychology (PSY101) is their first requirement. It offers a survey of the field and will help students who want to continue in psychology to determine which specific area they are interested in.</p> <p>“Unlike most subjects, psychology has become uniquely diverse,” said psychology student Paris Guzman, a student here at EMCC. “There are now a wide range of careers that you can choose from in this field.”</p> <p>To keep pace with these changes, EMCC offers classes such as “Psychology of Religion” and “Psychology and Culture.”</p> <p>Studying psychology at EMCC does not require students to learn theoretical information only. Guzman, who took <em>Introduction to Psychology</em> (PSY101) during the spring 2013 semester with Jean Norris-Bernal, recalls how this instructor would tell stories from her days as a therapist with a private practice, sharing real-life examples to illustrate psychological terms.</p> <p>“Ms. Bernal opened up a window for students because of her willingness to talk about her own experiences and encouraged us to voice our opinion on any psychological topic that intrigued us, even if it wasn’t directly mentioned in our textbook.”</p> <p>Norris-Bernal described her teaching approach this way, “With 20 years of clinical experience under my belt and a lifetime of family interaction, my life is an open book to my students so  they get a better understanding of those concepts that appear to be so complicated in their textbook.”</p> <p>For more information about studying psychology at EMCC, please visit the department website: <a href="http://www.estrellamountain.edu/programs/psychology" rel="nofollow">http://www.estrellamountain.edu/programs/psychology</a></p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/emcc-programs" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">EMCC Programs</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/emcc-classes" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">EMCC Classes</a></div></div></div> Mon, 23 Sep 2013 18:28:58 +0000 SELCB60601 126 at High Demand Causes Long Waiting Lists in Nursing Program /focus-learning/volume-2-issue-1/high-demand-causes-long-waiting-lists-nursing-program <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Manuel Guerrero</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/focus-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Focus on Learning</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/focus-learning/125-nursing.jpg?itok=CqnASHM6"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/focus-learning/125-nursing.jpg?itok=CqnASHM6" width="480" height="360" alt="Nursing Student During Practical Training" title="Nursing Student During Practical Training" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>Seeing students in scrubs is not an uncommon sight at Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC), as nursing degrees and certificates are in high demand.</p> <p>New students thinking of entering the field may find it daunting because of the wait time, requirements and overall commitment, but getting informed is the first step in the right direction to entering the Nursing Program.</p> <p>EMCC is one of eight Maricopa Community Colleges that offers these programs and certificates and it is the closest college for prospective students in the West Valley.</p> <p>New students must attend a Pre-Nursing Information Session before seeing an advisor. Sessions are offered Mondays and Thursdays in the spring and fall semesters. Students must also take an admission test before enrolling in program or certificate courses, and some require background checks.</p> <p>What many new students may not be aware of is the current two-year wait list to get accepted to the Associates Registered Nurse Program. Fortunately, it is “first come, first serve, so you don’t lose your place,” according to Clarissa Ruiz, advisor for nursing programs at EMCC.</p> <p>There is also a concurrent bachelor’s degree path through Northern Arizona University. “The good thing about the bachelor’s is that it can also be completed at EMCC,” according to Ruiz.</p> <p>The regulatory and accrediting agencies, such as the Board of Nursing and the Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing (ACEN), only allow a 10:1 ratio of students to teachers in the clinical setting and the teachers must have a Master of Science in Nursing and a minimum of two years of working experience to teach in a classroom setting. There is also limited clinical space. All of these requirements make it difficult to keep up with the demand.</p> <p>Ruiz advises students to talk to her so she can help them formulate a plan to take the necessary pre-requisite courses.</p> <p>She also advises students, while on the waitlist, to take a certificate program like Phlebotomy, Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) or Licensed Practical Nursing (LPN) to gain experience in other aspects of nursing.</p> <p>According to Ruiz, certificate programs such as these are also an option for students “looking to get a specific job, like at a long-term care facility or a rehabilitation center.”</p> <p>Ruiz says it’s not an easy path to become a RN, but with a good support system, it’s possible. The other certificates also help students to get established in the field without having to travel across the state to get certified.</p> <p>The options are available at EMCC for all kinds of careers. Students just need to get informed and create a path towards their educational goals.</p> <p> </p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/emcc-certificates" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">EMCC Certificates</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/emcc-programs" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">EMCC Programs</a></div></div></div> Mon, 23 Sep 2013 18:24:43 +0000 SELCB60601 125 at JRN201 Students Help Put The Lion's Perspective on the Map /focus-learning/volume-1-issue-1/jrn201-students-help-put-lions-perspective-map <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Manuel Guerrero</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/focus-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Focus on Learning</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC) students of the Journalism 201 class, News Writing, produced most of the content published in the inaugural issue of <em>The Lion’s Perspective</em> this spring semester.</p> <p>The introductory journalism course gave the students an overarching view of the journalism career field, ranging from journalism ethics, proper interview techniques, different journalism writing styles, and the emergence of social media.</p> <p>The article submissions were reviewed by Selina Schuh, course instructor, and Kathleen Iudicello, Division Chair of Arts and Composition, and they were approved by the student magazine’s Editorial Board members.</p> <p>The content that was chosen to be featured in <em>The Lion’s Perspective</em> highlights the journalism students’ best writing regarding EMCC events, student life, and editorials. The students mastered news stories, features, and many other writing styles, all of which are featured in the inaugural issue.</p> <p>“Journalism 201 was an interesting course,” said John Alvarado, a 20-year-old student who took the course. “It taught me how to work my way into the field of journalism and how the career works.”</p> <p>After each article, Instructor Schuh told the class what students did well in the article writing process and what could have been done better, commented Alvarado, who also said that he gained confidence in his interview techniques as the semester went on.</p> <p>In their final class, the 15 students had a roundtable discussion on how the class went and what they learned. They also read each other’s work and voted on articles they would like to see published in <em>The Lion’s Perspective</em>.</p> <p>Schuh has been teaching Journalism for three years at EMCC. She has written for local publications, such as <em>The</em> <em>Arizona Republic</em> and <em>Raising Arizona Kids,</em> so working on the student magazine was a natural fit for her. </p> <p>“We’ve been working on getting this magazine off the ground for quite some time. To see the first issue finally being published is quite exciting! The core of the content will probably always be generated by journalism students; however, we are hoping to get other students who are interested in writing involved as well,” said Schuh.</p> <p>The Division of Arts and Composition hopes to expand the journalism offerings each semester. This semester, Schuh is teaching JRN 201 and JRN 203, Writing for Online Media. Both courses prepare students for a career in journalism and allow students to produce content for <em>The Lion’s Perspective</em>.</p> <p>Students can enroll in any journalism class offered at EMCC if they are interested in writing for <em>The Lion’s Perspective.</em> Submissions from non-journalism students are also considered for publication. For more information on how to submit, contact Selina Schuh at <a href="mailto:selina.schuh@estrellamountain.edu" rel="nofollow">selina.schuh@estrellamountain.edu</a>.</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/emcc-programs" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">EMCC Programs</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/emcc-classes" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">EMCC Classes</a></div></div></div> Wed, 20 Feb 2013 17:28:41 +0000 KATMO78501 85 at Award Winning Culinary Studies /focus-learning/volume-1-issue-1/award-winning-culinary-studies <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Shashi DeHaan</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/focus-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Focus on Learning</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/focus-learning/84-culinary.jpg?itok=77eODScj"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/focus-learning/84-culinary.jpg?itok=77eODScj" width="480" height="320" alt="Culinary Student" title="Culinary Studies at EMCC" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>The Culinary Institute of Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC) boasts award-winning faculty and students.  During summer 2012, Chef Christopher Cwierz, adjunct faculty in Baking and Pastry, competed in the International Culinary Olympics in Erfurt, Germany, as a member of a United States regional team.  His team received the Bronze medal in a competition of 62 countries, ranking in the top 20 in the world. </p> <p>In a competition with five other EMCC students, Mashauna Jelavich, Culinary Studies student, received “Top Chef” honors from a diverse panel of judges, a $1000 scholarship, and her award winning entrée, Southwest Grilled Chicken, on the menu of Caballero Grill in Goodyear, Arizona.  Owners of Caballero Grill, Paul Fratella and Andrew Guerreio, have partnered with the Culinary Institute by offering internships and sponsored this competition and scholarship.</p> <p>Mashauna Jelavich said, “Winning the Caballero scholarship has given me confidence in my growing culinary skills.”</p> <p>Students interested in culinary arts can choose from multiple certificate, course, and degree options. EMCC’s Culinary Institute offers qualifying students opportunities for an Associate Degree in Applied Science, Culinary Studies, with 63 credits, which are fully transferrable to Northern Arizona University. The Culinary Institute also offers Certificates of Completion in Baking and Pastry, as well as Basic Culinary Studies for those who choose only to do a particular concentration. Each of the courses required in these certificates are required in the Culinary Studies degree. </p> <p>The Culinary Studies program offers a diverse course selection, including differentiated training in culinary theory, hospitality, and at least 500 hours of practical training in EMCC’s very own Regions Restaurant.  Most of the items produced in the kitchen are offered at a reasonable price in the restaurant. Patrons are seated by reservation only, which often have to be made weeks in advance.</p> <p>Jelavich said, “Being part of menu collaboration for Regions Restaurant and executing those recipes to prepare for the guests was rewarding and definitely a highlight of many of my culinary classes.”</p> <p>Tina Bort, a second semester culinary studies student, said, “A lot of other culinary institutes are not as affordable as Estrella Mountain’s program.”</p> <p>The reason for getting a culinary degree is compelling. Research by the National Restaurant Association states that “By 2022, restaurants in Arizona are expected to employ 303,000 people, 16.4 percent job growth – 42,800 new jobs.”</p> <p>Students choose the Culinary Institute for a variety of reasons, but they continue for the experience.  Isabel Lavander, a third-year student in the Culinary Studies program, said, “One reason I have stayed is because of the classroom environment.  We are together for long days. Chef Hill and Chef Griff joke around with you because they know you; you are not just a random student for eight weeks.”</p> <p>Chef Steven Griffiths, Program Director of the Culinary Institute, says students in the culinary courses attend for various reasons, such as recent high school graduates who are in pursuit of a career or current food service workers who are looking to improve their skills and training.</p> <p>“The food industry is a fast-paced, ever-expanding industry that takes a lot of perseverance and dedication to be successful.  The Culinary Studies program at EMCC is an excellent way to enter an occupation that focuses on food service and hospitality, providing the opportunity for West Valley students to pursue careers as professional chefs and food service managers,” said Griffiths.</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/emcc-programs" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">EMCC Programs</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/emcc-certificates" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">EMCC Certificates</a></div></div></div> Wed, 20 Feb 2013 17:26:46 +0000 KATMO78501 84 at