Lions Perspective - Activism /tags/activism en One Billion Rising at EMCC /campus-life/volume-3-issue-1/one-billion-rising-emcc <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Ernesto Oliva</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/campus-life" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Campus Life</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/campus-life/189-onebillionrisingcopy.jpg?itok=8R9ltfUi"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/campus-life/189-onebillionrisingcopy.jpg?itok=8R9ltfUi" width="480" height="320" alt="One Billion Rising" title="EMCC Students Dancing at the One Billion Rising Event" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>On February 2014, Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC) participated in the global “One Billion Rising” dance campaign to raise awareness and to end violence against women and young girls. </p> <p>The “One Billion Rising” campaign created a choreographed dance to “break the chain.” The purpose of the dance is for women to figuratively “break off the chain” their abuser has on them.</p> <p>Worldwide, violence against women happens often. One of the event coordinators, Dr. Sandy Zetlan stated, “One out of three women in the world are beaten or raped one time in their life.”</p> <p>The dance is all about a woman owning her space and not being scared to dance in public. Sociology professor, Dr. Olga Tsoudis led the dance for faculty and students as she demonstrated each new move that had its own meaning.</p> <p>During the event, various women took the stage and shared their story on how they survived the consistent abuse suffered earlier in their lives. Student Andrew Tran stated, “Being surrounded by all of these women who have survived being mistreated by men is inspiring. It’s also great that Estrella Mountain Community College is shining some light on this subject.”</p> <p>The outside courtyard of Estrella Hall was decorated with inspirational T-shirts that promoted encouragement with such phrases like “battered but not broken” and “break the silence.”</p> <p>Student Jemimah Garcia said, “I’m glad that I attend a college where these types of issues about women are important. It makes me feel like I am making a difference for others.”</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-engagement" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Engagement</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/educating-community" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Educating the Community</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/campus-event" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Campus Event</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/activism" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Activism</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/active-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Active Learning</a></div></div></div> Tue, 04 Nov 2014 22:04:01 +0000 MARDH70971 189 at A Home That Gives Animals Hope /beyond-campus/volume-2-issue-2/home-gives-animals-hope <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Eva Ziegler</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/beyond-campus" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Beyond Campus</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/beyond-campus/176-animalshelterzieglerrw.jpg?itok=lswvfwB-"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/beyond-campus/176-animalshelterzieglerrw.jpg?itok=lswvfwB-" width="480" height="320" alt="No-Kill Shelters" title="No-Kill Shelters" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>What happens when one drops an animal off at a pound? Picture this: a tearful child waving goodbye to his pet at the pound, distraught that he could not take care of it. As the animal walks down the corridor to meet its fate, whimpering cries bounce off the wall and a smell of dirt mixed with toxic moisture lingers in the air. It is at this moment, walking through this dank hall, that the animal knows. The animal panics, ears become flat, and its posture slackens. As it gazes upon that dark door into the unknown, it realizes that these halls might be the last thing that it will see in its short life. Animals, like people, can sense when death is near.</p> <p>The Humane Society has to put down three to four million animals each year due to overpopulation in the shelters.  Animals have to be euthanized, not because they are vicious or dangerous, but because a previous owner failed to take care of them properly.</p> <p>There are a number of no-kill animal shelters scattered across the United States. Not only do these shelters spay and neuter animals to solve the problem of euthanasia, but they also give animals a second chance. No-kill shelters care for animals that have been neglected or abused and send them to new homes. However, no-kill shelters cannot always take animals in because they do not have enough workers to care for the amount of animals that enter the shelter. This is where volunteering comes in. Volunteers are the reason every animal has new hope for a future loving home.</p> <p>How can volunteering change the life of volunteers and the animals' life as well?</p> <p>Vanessa Lhanes, the front desk attendant at Sun Valley Animal Shelter, explained, “You get to be around animals all day. It is fun and you learn with the animals. Sometimes if you’re having a bad day you can just go in the kitten room and lay down. Who wouldn’t feel better when they are surrounded by kittens?” In fact, upon interviewing people in the shelter, it seemed as if everyone had this same view. Half the workers, who started as volunteers, do not even clock in when they go in to work. “It is not about the money,” Lhanes says, “It is about the animals.”</p> <p>Kurt Oleson, the current manager of Sun Valley Animal Shelter, started volunteering in 2008 and has been active in the shelter ever since. “You have to ask yourself, are you doing it for yourself or the animals? Either way, everyone gets something out of it. It is better than staying at home. It makes you feel good about yourself and you are making a difference in the animal’s lives at the same time," Oleson said. In fact, the shelter adopts about 700 animals per month.</p> <p>Despite the massive number, the employees are actually very picky about what homes they send the animals to. That is also where the volunteers come in. They characterize the animals based on their personality and make it easier to find the best home for them. Plastered over the walls of the shelter are the colorful labels of perky dogs. One of a little black Chihuahua reads, “Jeff; Outgoing and playful: I was transferred from another shelter due to overcrowding. You may notice that I bark and act like a stud muffin, but that’s because I don’t know you. Once I know I can trust you, I’m a big love bug.”</p> <p>Looking around at these signs that detail each dog’s unique personality, anyone can realize how much work goes into the shelter. No animal is left behind because the volunteers get to know them and give them the attention that they need.  Every time Oleson spoke, dogs all around the shelter were being walked, their gums pulled back with huge grins and floppy, pink tongues askew. As one of the dogs playfully nudged Oleson’s leg, he explained, “I couldn’t work in a shelter that euthanizes. If I see Fluffy or Tiger one day, I would not be able to handle not seeing them the next day.” He added, “It is a big family. Sometimes you don’t want to say bye to the animals, but you do it knowing you sent them to a good home.”</p> <p>The Sun Valley Animal Shelter is just one of the no-kill shelters across America. According to the American Humane Association, “fifty-six percent of dogs and seventy-one percent of cats … are euthanized,” in a typical shelter. Oleson emphasized: “We are here to give the animals a forever home. We leave here every day knowing that we did that.”</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/activism" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Activism</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/volunteering" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Volunteering</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/educating-community" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Educating the Community</a></div></div></div> Mon, 03 Mar 2014 20:39:51 +0000 ERIXL33951 176 at EMCC Students Walk to Fight AIDS /focus-learning/volume-2-issue-2/emcc-students-walk-fight-aids <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Kristofer Lervold and Kayt Ludi</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/focus-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Focus on Learning</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/focus-learning/172-aidswalk3.jpg?itok=UDnHDAXj"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/focus-learning/172-aidswalk3.jpg?itok=UDnHDAXj" width="480" height="246" alt="SOC 130 class at the AIDS Walk in Phoenix." title="SOC 130 class at the AIDS Walk in Phoenix." /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>“Thank you all for joining us on our momentous occasion! We are so happy that so many people made it today! And now, on your mark, get set, go!”</p> <p>That’s how the AIDS walk started; several thousand people walking in unison for a common cause. Some people were alone, listening to music and jogging to the beat. Others walked with families, most likely planning to visit the surrounding restaurants and hot spots later. Some people also walked in groups, surrounded by their peers from social circles or the workplace. </p> <p>There were even a select few people who dressed up in drag.</p> <p>Throughout the walk, you could see people smiling, talking, and enjoying each other’s company.</p> <p>Then there was Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC).</p> <p>One morning, Professor Olga Tsoudis explained to her class SOC130 class that it would be participating in the AIDS walk. The students would also be organizing and recruiting others. To accomplish their task, they set up booths around campus, asking for donations to fund AIDS research, and also to hand out male and female condoms.</p> <p>More than one curious passerby looked at the array of prevention devices, which ranged from dental dams (to protect during oral sex) to female condoms. Many students who saw these items had no idea what they were, and most seemed embarrassed to ask.</p> <p>As for information on the AIDS walk, many people asked when it was starting, how much it costs, but most asked in disbelief, “You mean I could bring my dog to walk too?”</p> <p>“Yes!” they replied. Each dog could raise its own amount of money, and that too would go towards raising money for the AIDS walk. After switching the donation jar picture to show various dogs that were going to walk, donations seemed to increase to support the caring canines.</p> <p>CJ Minott, Director of Events at Aunt Rita’s Foundation (the organizers of AIDS Walk Phoenix), estimated that 6,000 people participated this year.  “It was our largest turnout ever.” Minott said.  All those people joined together to help stop the spread of a disease that has caused much harm in many lives.</p> <p>A woman with a microphone was pumping up the crowd, as back up dancers kept the beat of the music. During the walk, various points would have spots for local bands, who sold their CDs on the side to support their goals as well.</p> <p>EMCC student Annmarie Mathis said, “It was interesting to see so many diverse groups of people coming together for a common goal, a common purpose.”</p> <p>Nicole Archuletta, a fellow EMCC student, commented, “I really enjoyed walking in the AIDS walk. It was amazing to see so many people supporting a great cause.”</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/activism" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Activism</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/educating-community" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Educating the Community</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-engagement" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Engagement</a></div></div></div> Mon, 03 Mar 2014 20:29:03 +0000 ERIXL33951 172 at ISLO: A Pathway to Success /clubs-and-sports/volume-2-issue-2/islo-pathway-success <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Katelyn Wiley</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/clubs-and-sports" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Clubs and Sports</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/clubs-and-sports/157-islo.jpg?itok=9tRMb3Lt"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/clubs-and-sports/157-islo.jpg?itok=9tRMb3Lt" width="480" height="360" alt="ISLO" title="ISLO club members dressed for EMCC&#039;s International Festival." /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>As college students we all want to meet new people, get involved with the school, and have fun. The best way to do all three of these things at the same time would be to join a school club.</p> <p>Now when it comes to joining a school club you have to make sure you pick the perfect one for you.The sensible idea would be to choose a club related towards one’s passions and field of study, such as a theater major joining a drama club.</p> <p>This allows college students to work with what they love and build a better knowledge on the subject. Others join clubs simply to get involved and to have fun while on campus, like the Latin Dance Club. Finally, some join clubs to gain knowledge on a new topic or to help others.</p> <p>The International Student Leadership Organization, ISLO for short, is a club founded by Estella Mountain Community College (EMCC) students who had the urge to make a difference and it has been a successful club ever since.</p> <p>Makayla Sullivan, the communication officer for the ISLO Club says, “The International Student Leadership Organization is a club that volunteers at community and school events. It’s where we learn how to become leaders by helping out others.”</p> <p>As a member of the ISLO Club students not only participate in events planned out by the ISLO Club but also with clubs throughout the campus. The ISLO Club is there to help out other clubs and make sure events go well while also showing their support in the community by attending local events.</p> <p>Cindy Gilles, the president of the ISLO Club says, “The International Student Leadership Organization Club helps broaden cultural awareness and offers personal development and leadership skills.”</p> <p>“The international part of ISLO is that we invite everyone of every culture to join our club and have a place to be able to be themselves. We have a lot of people who came from other countries or even if our parents or ancestors came from another country.”  Sullivan explains why it is called International Students leadership organization.</p> <p>“The international part plays a huge role in ISLO. Half of our volunteer events that we volunteer at are at different cultural events. Like we volunteer at the Irish Cultural Festival, Russian Festival and just other international festivals and events.”</p> <p>In the month of November 2013 the ISLO Club has helped and participated in several events such as the International Festival where they showed students multicultural experiences from all over the world. During this event they planned for cultural arts, arts and crafts, live performances, study abroad program, and a fashion show for students to learn about different cultures.</p> <p>The ISLO Club also went to the Saint Mary’s Food Bank around Thanksgiving to help them with whatever they needed, knowing that the food bank would be extremely busy around such a holiday. With this major holiday taking place they were also participating in “No Turkey Left Behind” at the Sun City Health and Rehabilitation Center where they met new people and participated in actives to give back the community.</p> <p>An example of a past event that ISLO held to help the community was during the International Health Expo. “My favorite event I volunteered at was the International Heath Expo at Estrella. We taught students about how rice is a main staple for some countries and we just talked about all the different facts about rice,” stated Sullivan.</p> <p>However, ISLO is not only about giving back to the community, but becoming a leader, “My favorite activity we did was that we had a professor who taught at Estrella help us take a personality quiz and he explained what our results were and what our specific qualities and weaknesses are.”</p> <p>As you can tell by the list of activities above the ISLO club strives to help others which does not only give them a good feeling of knowing they help someone but the ISLO club has a lot of more benefits. Some benefits of joining the ISLO club would be volunteer hours, “You get to volunteer and put that on your resume. It looks very good, especially if you are applying for a leadership position,” said Makayla Sullivan.</p> <p>With the workforce becoming more difficult to join we need an extra boost for support and the ISLO club is a great way to achieve it. However, job resumes are not the only benefit of joining. The ISLO Club is a great club to place on college applications.</p> <p>The International Student Leadership Organization Club meets on Tuesdays afternoons from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. in the Plaza Gallery located next to the Career and Transfer Center. If helping out the community and your school while learning to better your understanding of different cultures sounds like an interesting activity to you, send an email to Cindy Gilles at <a href="mailto:cinlc04781@maricopa.edu" rel="nofollow">cinlc04781@maricopa.edu</a>.</p> <p>Once you do this she will simply ask for your information and begin to send you emails to let you know of events and meetings. “We are a very active group and there are no fees to join and no requirements,” says Gilles.<br />  </p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/activism" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Activism</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/cultural-celebration" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Cultural Celebration</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-clubs-0" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Clubs</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-engagement" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Engagement</a></div></div></div> Mon, 03 Mar 2014 19:11:32 +0000 ERIXL33951 157 at A Bright Future for PRIDE Club Members and the LGBTQ Community /clubs-and-sports/volume-2-issue-2/bright-future-pride-club-members-and-lgbtq-community <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Abby Landis</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/clubs-and-sports" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Clubs and Sports</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/clubs-and-sports/156-sandyzetlan.jpg?itok=ssU8_DR2"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/clubs-and-sports/156-sandyzetlan.jpg?itok=ssU8_DR2" width="239" height="283" alt="Pride Club Advisor Sandy Zetlan" title="Pride Club Advisor Sandy Zetlan" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>“I was bullied pretty bad in high school…I got a concussion from being slammed into a wall.”</p> <p>This is just one incident of unfortunate occurrences that plague adolescents who reveal themselves to be members of the LGBTQ community.  Happenings such as this one are frequent to those who choose to “come out”, as lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender.</p> <p>Schools such as Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC) have clubs to give common ground and support for those who identify as LGBTQ, such as the PRIDE Club. The term PRIDE is commonly used for many LGBTQ organizations.</p> <p>It is not an acronym; it stands for the pride the members feels for their own sexuality and who they are as individuals. Because of the sensitivity of the topics discussed in this article, all of the students interviewed chose to remain anonymous.</p> <p>PRIDE Club advisor and biology faculty Dr. Sonya Zetlan discusses the occurrences of bullying because of sexual orientation. She said, that “a lot of it is still clandestine.” Supporting this, a student in the PRIDE Club revealed that instances of cyberbullying are rapidly climbing because of the ease of access to social media. The student said there is “stuff that’s hard to prove and report.”</p> <p>Openly LGBTQ students would be an easy target if their first and last name were known. A few clicks of the mouse and all evidence of the bullying would be eradicated and the bullied student would be left with the emotional scars for years to come. Another student said that bullying occurs so often because “people aren’t used to any difference.”</p> <p>Zetlan said something similar, as she thought that “part of it is lack of education outside of their own community, and lack of awareness of positive aspects of diversity.” When asked if hatred toward the LGBTQ community had a correlation with this country being founded on Christian beliefs, she stated that “hate comes in all flavors—everyone is willing to be intolerant.”</p> <p>Zetlan said the EMCC PRIDE Club exists to “provide a supportive, politically active, educational, and socially fun environment for LGBTQ students.” Zetlan gave an insight to what types of events the PRIDE Club hosts on campus as well as happenings off campus. Zetlan said that because of the roots of the club, most of the events the PRIDE Club puts on are geared toward LGBTQ issues.</p> <p>PRIDE has a table during AIDS Awareness Month, and “during Women’s History Month we have a table for women’s issues,” Zetlan said. It also has a table for Coming Out Day on October 11th of every year. At their stations one would find information on the current issue and how it applies to the LGBTQ community.</p> <p>In addition to on-campus events, the PRIDE Club travels to downtown Phoenix to visit the art galleries. Zetlan said that “we sell buttons” to raise money for trips, and “we have our own button making machine”. Surprisingly, most of the PRIDE club’s money comes from donations. They received enough money two years ago to travel to Los Angeles. Zetlan also said that the EMCC campus, “is a very open campus to LGBTQ students and faculty. Because of that it is a very safe campus.”</p> <p>According to Parents, Families, and Friends of Lesbians and Gays, or PFLAG, a community of individuals working to promote safety and wellness in the LBGT community, “half of gay males experience a negative parental reaction when they come out and in 26 percent of those cases the youth was thrown out of the home”.</p> <p>A PRIDE club student member feared he would be one of those 26 percent, as he still has not told his family about his sexuality. He worries that he will be kicked out of the house and shunned from the family.</p> <p>According to CNN, on November 7th, 2013, Congress passed a law that would “protect gay, lesbian, and transgender employees from discrimination in the workplace”. The Employment Nondiscrimination Act, or ENDA, is one of many legislations that will empower the LGBTQ community, as times are changing and the social structure is constantly shifting.</p> <p>The New York Times reported that this is the first time in history both the Republicans and the Democrats have approved a nondiscrimination law that included transgender people. Zetlan was thrilled and encouraged at these new changes.</p> <p>Because students work while attending school, PRIDE club students discussed the new legislation. They said now if an issue arises, members of the LBGT community will be able to protect themselves in the workplace. It was often uncertain if employers would take the side of a LGBT employee. One student reported that the law “is going to make sure [the employers] have a liability to back you up.”</p> <p>The Republican Party had doubts about the bill. Republican Speaker John A. Boehner said that the bill will “cost American jobs.” He did not expand on this statement. PRIDE members are hopeful that ENDA will create a brighter future for the LGBTQ community.</p> <p>Gay marriage is a hot topic in this country as well. Zetlan touched on the subject, saying “there are interesting things” happening with marriage. She also said that “states are starting to come around.” According to procon.org, only 17 states have legalized same-sex marriage. Contrasting, 33 states have completely banned same-sex marriage. Given this new ENDA legislation, the LGBTQ community may see changes in the marriage department.</p> <p>EMCC’s PRIDE Club is just one example of the expanding acceptance that this country is experiencing. The club hopes that ENDA will pave the way to a more tolerant and liberal society.<br />  </p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-clubs-0" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Clubs</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/activism" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Activism</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-support" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Support</a></div></div></div> Mon, 03 Mar 2014 19:09:24 +0000 ERIXL33951 156 at EMCC Veteran’s Club Builds Bridge To Local Community: Launches Support for Homeless Veterans /clubs-and-sports/volume-2-issue-2/emcc-veterans-club-builds-bridge-local-community-launches-support <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Monica Garcia </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/clubs-and-sports" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Clubs and Sports</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/clubs-and-sports/155-veternsclubsellingbowls.jpg?itok=ZJLKXdhW"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/clubs-and-sports/155-veternsclubsellingbowls.jpg?itok=ZJLKXdhW" width="360" height="480" alt="Veterens" title="EMCC Veterens Club selling bowls to raise money and awareness." /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>You may be sitting at home while reading this article, but to the over 1,600 homeless veterans in Arizona, there is not a home to go back to.</p> <p>20 percent of homeless individuals in Arizona are veterans, according to USVetsInc.org., an issue that the Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC) Veteran’s Club takes to heart.</p> <p>The Veteran’s Club was signed into action at the beginning of October but has already started an initiative that will greatly help veterans in the community.</p> <p>“We hit the ground running, that’s for sure,” says Thomas Koch, President of the Veteran’s Club.</p> <p>Maryhelen Rosales, Co-Advisor of the Veteran’s Club and former Air Force veteran, came to the Veteran’s Club with a plan to help local veterans. Rosales had been searching for a way to give  back to the veteran community.</p> <p>The United States Veteran’s Initiative is a non-profit, statewide organization that provides assistance for military veterans and their families through housing, counseling, career development and support.</p> <p>The organization located in Phoenix started renovating an existing hotel in order to provide housing for veterans. These veterans are often homeless and have no other place to go.</p> <p>Money for the renovations are made with donations. $2,000 helps U.S. Veterans completely renovate a room, and any donations help provide materials for renovations.</p> <p>The Veteran’s Club jumped straight into planning in order to raise these funds. </p> <p>“Initially,” Rosales said, “when [the Veteran’s Club] was looking for officers they weren’t even looking for a treasurer because they didn’t want to raise any money for the club itself - but wanted to give back to the community.”</p> <p>Two major goals of the Veteran’s Club are to make other veteran students at EMCC aware of resources and how to utilize them, and secondly to give back to the veteran community. Inspired by Empty Bowl Events for World Food Day, Rosales thought, “Why can't we do something like that for veterans?”</p> <p>So the Veteran’s Club sprang into action. The plan was to decorate bowls and receive cash donations for them. The Veteran’s Club, however, didn’t have any funds to start off with. They reached out to the community and worked with local veteran organizations. They met with the President and Treasurer of the VFW Chapter #40 in Avondale, who donated $100 on the spot in order for the club to purchase bowls.</p> <p>With a bit of a laugh, Rosales commented, “And so we went to a few 99¢ stores and  just bought them out of plain white bowls!”</p> <p>Within that week, the club had everything prepared for the Paint-A-Bowl event. Held in the Plaza Gallery, the club allowed students and faculty to decorate their own bowls at no cost. “There was a ton of support from the instructors and students,” said Koch.</p> <p>Those who took part in the event were able to donate or pay for the bowls if they wanted to keep them. Rosales mentioned that “there were even students that gave whatever money they had out of their pocket just to donate to the cause.”</p> <p>The event raised around $1000, with donations even as high as $50.</p> <p>Other donations came in from the community as well.</p> <p>Adolfo Gámez, Mayor of Tolleson, worked with his organization  Hispanic Leader Forum del Oeste, Inc., and donated a $500 check. The owners of Avondale’s Auggie’s Sports Grill and Honey Baked Ham store also made donations to the cause. And Dysart High School’s Art Club reached out and donated more bowls to the Veteran’s Club.</p> <p>After the Paint a Bowl Event, the Veteran’s Club is currently only $500 short of its goal. During the whole project, Rosales and Koch agree that there was amazing support from the Avondale community.</p> <p>And despite only starting, the Veteran’s Club has built a network through this huge response, all willing and wanting to help the club next year, as Rosales says they will have a similar project to help the Veteran’s community.</p> <p>“What we want to do,” Koch says about the Veteran’s Club, “is to make sure that Vets are aware of what is available in the local community, to have resources available for their futures, and to help with job search, resume building —  just the basic transition from military life to civilian life. Because we all speak the same lingo.”</p> <p>On Veteran’s Day the club got together and went downtown to the Veteran’s Hospital and spent the day with the veterans staying there. “We spoke to a lot of them, pushed them to the parade that goes past the hospital.” Koch remembers it was a “pretty moving experience for all of us.” </p> <p>Not only has the Veteran’s Club followed its goals in making resources available for veteran students at EMCC and giving back to the veteran community, it has also built a community in the club and a sense of camaraderie.</p> <p>“The major thing is that we’ve all formed a special bond and we’re all friends,” Rosales says. “What’s nice is that everybody understands what the other person is talking about, like what Tom says —we speak the same lingo.”</p> <p>The Veteran’s Club meets every Friday at noon to eat lunch and “shoot the breeze” as both Rosales and Koch describe. “Members are from all branches of the military— and from all walks of life.”</p> <p>The Veteran’s Club is always looking for more veteran students to be involved with the community.</p> <p>For more information, please visit: <a href="http://www.estrellamountain.edu/students/veterans-services/emcc-veterans-club" rel="nofollow">http://www.estrellamountain.edu/students/veterans-services/emcc-veterans...</a></p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-clubs-0" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Clubs</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/activism" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Activism</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-support" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Support</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-engagement" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Engagement</a></div></div></div> Wed, 26 Feb 2014 20:39:51 +0000 ERIXL33951 155 at Earth Week: Make Your Voice Heard /campus-life/volume-2-issue-1/earth-week-make-your-voice-heard <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Chelsey Petersen</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/campus-life" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Campus Life</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/campus-life/137-earthweek.jpg?itok=huGjRSfn"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/campus-life/137-earthweek.jpg?itok=huGjRSfn" width="320" height="480" alt="Earth Week: Make Your Voice Heard" title="Art Creaded From Recycled Goods" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>Earth Week attracted students who wanted to get into the “green” spirit with activities and movies.  </p> <p>People may think that all they need to do to contribute to Earth Week is to recycle their plastic soda bottle or pick up a piece of trash on the side walk.  Certainly recycling and collecting trash is helpful, but there is a larger goal behind living green.</p> <p>EMCC Sustainability Team Co-Chair, Nadine Johnson, believes that “Earth Week represents a time to celebrate environmental conservation and responsibility.” Earth Week is about taking control of situations that can be controlled if we put our minds to it. Additionally, EMCC student Kaitlyn Thompson is “glad that there are people who care”.</p> <p>During the Earth Week festivities, a couple of movies were presented that expanded on the idea of what Earth Week and caring for the environment is really about. One of the films was “Sharkwater”, a documentary that followed Rob Stewart on his quest to save sharks being illegally fished and killed for their fins. Stewart ventured to Costa Rica with Paul Watson, a long-time defender of sharks. Stewart explained that sharks are not as dangerous as everyone believes. After spending many hours amongst sharks, his research shows that “It doesn’t want to hurt you and it’s the most beautiful thing you’ve ever seen.” Stewart also goes on to say that the reason sharks have been depicted as such frightening creatures is because “The media […] loves to have a monster.”</p> <p>Stewart and Watson went on a grueling journey, complete with danger and legal issues, discovered the scope of the undercover shark fin industry. They eventually had to flee Costa Rica to avoid being arrested on the charges of attempted murder after they ran into an illegal fishing boat.</p> <p>Another film, “Otter 501”, followed Katie, a young woman striving to become a marine biologist. While vacationing in Monterey at her uncle’s house for six months, Katie comes to terms with the positive and negative aspects of being a marine biologist, after she finds a baby sea otter abandoned on the beach. This event pushed her to connect with members of the Monterey Bay Aquarium who are conducting studies on sea otters. Katie helps the animals by surveying them and recording information about what they are doing and when they are doing it. Katie creates a special bond with the otter she rescued, and in turn begins to love all of the otters and wants to help them.</p> <p>The three main characters of these documentaries reveal the larger meaning of Earth Week: Make your voice heard. Do not be afraid to speak up about issues that are bothering you about the environment. Stewart, Watson, and Katie decided to speak up and be heard.</p> <p>.</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/campus-event" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Campus Event</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/emcc-campus" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">EMCC Campus</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/activism" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Activism</a></div></div></div> Mon, 23 Sep 2013 19:28:02 +0000 MAN2026125 137 at Blomstrand Inspires Students Through Active Learning /profiles/volume-2-issue-1/blomstrand-inspires-students-through-active-learning <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Manuel Guerrero</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/profile" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Profiles</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/profiles/133-eblomstrand.jpg?itok=rK1LmJru"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/profiles/133-eblomstrand.jpg?itok=rK1LmJru" width="345" height="480" alt="EMCC Faculty Erin Blomstrand" title="Erin Blomstrand" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>Erin Blomstrand’s class offerings at Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC) include Banned Books and Censorship (ENH 295) and Shakespeare on Film (ENH 256), unique classes for a teacher who has had a unique background herself. </p> <p>Blomstrand has taught at EMCC since 2004. In addition to being a teacher, she is a feminist, activist and daughter. She draws on her experiences to help students learn more than what’s inside a college textbook.</p> <p>Originally from Panorama City, Calif., Blomstrand moved to Washington state with her parents after her father received a job offer. A few years later they moved to Litchfield Park, Ariz. where she attended elementary school.</p> <p>She returned to California for College, where she found one of her many passions while attending Diablo Valley College.  As a sophomore she learned set design and then moved into set painting and designing in a local theater. </p> <p>Later, Blomstrand attended Cal-State Hayward and received a bachelor’s degree in English. She remembers one moment in school where she realized that she had the potential to be a teacher.</p> <p>“On one of the assignments, the instructor let me go for over 30 minutes,” said Blomstrand about a presentation she did. Her instructor was impressed with how effectively she had articulated the topic.</p> <p>She then began to pursue a master’s degree in English at Mills College, where she found out how much she enjoyed learning.</p> <p>"It was the most rewarding and exhilarating time of my life. I cherished every moment on campus,” said Blomstrand, who also taught foreign exchange students while there. “I loved learning, exchanging ideas with my professors and classmates. I felt like a scholar and academic in my master’s program.”</p> <p>While earning her doctoral degree in Post Secondary Education, she had a different experience.  She took an online course and realized the teacher wrote to the students in all caps. It seemed unprofessional and unnecessary to her.</p> <p>“I decided I didn’t need to be tortured by this person, so I dropped the class and took it again with a professor who knew that netiquette must be observed when teaching an online class,” said Blomstrand.</p> <p>Blomstrand returned to Arizona in 2004 to help her parents get settled after retirement. “I remember driving through here and seeing a school, where there used to be a melon field,” said Blomstrand, referring to the EMCC campus.</p> <p>She decided to apply for a position at the school and got hired teaching high school students in Tolleson in a dual-enrollment program in 2004. Her life before then had been filled with gaining knowledge and the first couple of semesters of teaching at EMCC were no exception.</p> <p>“I was enjoying teaching, but I saw that all I was doing was lecturing, just like my previous instructors,” said Blomstrand. “I learned from a colleague close to me about active learning. That was the beginning of my learning as an instructor.”</p> <p>Since then, Blomstrand has never looked back. She says the method works because it engages students, instead of just having them write notes in a notebook.</p> <p>“Active learning is where you are engaging students, doing activities, rather than me lecturing. I create activities for them to figure out. I also have them come up with activities when I direct them to teach the class on a specific topic.” said Blomstrand, who also teaches English 101 and 102. “Getting students involved is much better because then they will connect with the subject themselves.”</p> <p>Blomstrand teaches more than what is expected because she knows that all students’ aspirations are unique. “They need to be functioning and capable whether it is at Pepperdine or at Arizona State. I don’t discriminate. I prepare them for the next level, whatever that may be,” said Blomstrand.</p> <p>Blomstrand also understands that learning doesn’t need to be confined to the classroom. That is why she helps organize multiple campus activities, such as Banned Books Week, Love Your Body Week and Domestic Violence Awareness Week.</p> <p>Blomstrand is always thirsting for knowledge; in the near future she wants to travel to England to study 18th Century Theater first hand, gain knowledge and share it with the students she teaches.</p> <p> </p> <p> </p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/activism" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Activism</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/educating-community" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Educating the Community</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/employees" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Employees</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-engagement" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Engagement</a></div></div></div> Mon, 23 Sep 2013 18:50:44 +0000 SELCB60601 133 at Professor Tsoudis Shares Activism and Travel with Students /profiles/volume-2-issue-1/professor-tsoudis-shares-activism-and-travel-students <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Manuel Guerrero</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/profile" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Profiles</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/profiles/132-otsoudis.jpg?itok=BnaX4dTS"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/profiles/132-otsoudis.jpg?itok=BnaX4dTS" width="480" height="360" alt="EMCC Faculty Olga Tsoudis Volunteering in Africa" title="Olga Tsoudis" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>This summer, Dr. Olga Tsoudis, residential faculty for Sociology at Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC), traveled to Tanzania to volunteer at an orphanage with the Make a Difference (MAD) NOW organization, a nonprofit using a family and sustainability model to work with a select group of orphaned and vulnerable children by paying their school fees through college in a matching funds partnership with the schools the children attend.</p> <p>Tsoudis, who has been teaching at EMCC for ten years, enjoys traveling and making a difference in and outside the classroom as a sociology instructor and activist.</p> <p>She travelled with EMCC Counseling faculty, Dr. Bertha Medina, and together they tutored math, reading and made collages with the kids. They also shared a movie night and played soccer.</p> <p>Tsoudis commented, “Being in Africa confirmed for me even more and further reminded me that there is more to life than materialistic things and the competition for them,” said Tsoudis. “There are children who are grateful for what little they have and appreciate the world that they are in and they are smiling.”</p> <p>Tsoudis earned a bachelor’s degree in Human Development and Family Studies from Cornell University and a master’s and doctorate degree in Sociology from the University of Arizona.</p> <p>On campus she teaches SOC130: Human Sexuality, SOC157: Marriage and Family, and SOC212: Gender and Society.</p> <p>She also coordinates events with other faculty for the entire campus, such as Love Your Body Week, Domestic Violence Awareness, and Women’s History Month with English faculty Erin Blomstrand, and One Billion Rising with Biology faculty Sandy Zetlan and Marsha Segerberg; all of which she is very passionate about.</p> <p>“These events help make the students more socially aware of the issues,” said Tsoudis. “I try to involve my students.”</p> <p>Tsoudis has traveled extensively, exploring Greece and Cyprus where her and her husband’s family live, Singapore, and Nepal, and even Antarctica.  When she is not teaching or traveling, Tsoudis is an activist participating in AIDS walks, fundraising or securing donations for The New Life Center as well as other organizations that support women’s and gay rights.</p> <p>She says her activism goes hand in hand with her teaching subjects. It allows for people to understand each other better because everyone comes from different backgrounds.</p> <p>“I do think it’s my responsibility,” said Tsoudis. “However you don’t have to be a sociologist. Anyone can take on this responsibility and make a difference in the world.”</p> <p>Students who take her classes get to see pictures of her travels and are treated with guest speakers she has met throughout her journeys and connect with her activism.</p> <p>Tsoudis says she doesn’t see herself doing anything else. She likes EMCC and the Arizona weather, but when she can, she explores different parts of the world.</p> <p>When asked where she would like to travel next, her answer was simple, “I’ll travel anywhere I haven’t been to.”</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/activism" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Activism</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/educating-community" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Educating the Community</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/employees" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Employees</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-engagement" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Engagement</a></div></div></div> Mon, 23 Sep 2013 18:48:52 +0000 SELCB60601 132 at The Green Team /focus-learning/volume-2-issue-1/green-team <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Manuel Guerrero</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/focus-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Focus on Learning</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/focus-learning/130-owl.jpg?itok=wIIdyR64"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/focus-learning/130-owl.jpg?itok=wIIdyR64" width="480" height="320" alt="Burrowing Owls Living on Campus" title="Burrowing Owls Living on Campus" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>On a campus where students are constantly rushing from class to class, the efforts of people who keep the school environmentally friendly can get lost.</p> <p>Estrella Mountain Community College’s (EMCC) Sustainability Team, co-chaired by Eric Huntsinger and Nadine Johnson, is responsible for finding ways to make the campus “greener.”</p> <p>“The mission of the EMCC Sustainability Team is to promote environmental, economic, and social responsibility by providing advocacy, education, activities, and recommendations to students, faculty, staff and the surrounding communities,” explained Huntsinger.</p> <p>The teammates have been vitally important in making the Sustainability Team into what it is today. They helped develop the organizational structure of the team and have co-chaired all its efforts since the inception in August of 2009. Both Huntsinger and Johnson each spend several hours a week on various projects and meet once a month to update the team on everyone’s progress. </p> <p>One project this past spring consisted of developing a plan to protect two burrowing owls that had been found in an area that is designated for construction of the new Performing Arts building. According to Johnson, the goal was not only to save the two owls, but hopefully to make the EMCC campus an ideal environment to house dozens more. </p> <p>Currently, the team is are also working on a Sustainability Tracking and Rating System report, which will be published in January 2014, and focuses on reducing the school’s carbon emission footprint. This reduction is a requirement for each college within the Maricopa Community College District.</p> <p>“It is the responsibility of community colleges and universities to inform and educate our future generations,” said Huntsinger. He then added, “It is important for campuses to respond to environmental pressures and find new and innovative ways to help mitigate environmental issues.”</p> <p>Huntsinger, an economics professor, and Johnson, a curriculum technician, continue to work hard after their “day jobs” on campus to help EMCC be a “greener” place for students to learn. Much of their effort allows students to stop and smell the desert plants around campus.</p> <p>For more information on the Sustainability Team and how to get involved, please visit: <a href="http://www.estrellamountain.edu/sustainability/team" rel="nofollow">http://www.estrellamountain.edu/sustainability/team</a></p> <p> </p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/activism" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Activism</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/educating-community" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Educating the Community</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/employees" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Employees</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-engagement" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Engagement</a></div></div></div> Mon, 23 Sep 2013 18:43:26 +0000 SELCB60601 130 at