Lions Perspective - Educating the Community /tags/educating-community en StoriEstrella /campus-life/volume-3-issue-1/storiestrella <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Katelyn Wiley</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/campus-life" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Campus Life</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/campus-life/208-storiestrella.jpg?itok=wnc4QbrY"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/campus-life/208-storiestrella.jpg?itok=wnc4QbrY" width="480" height="320" alt="Fine and Performing Arts Week" title="Fine and Performing Arts Week at EMCC" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>As part of Fine and Performing Arts Week, Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC) held “StoriEstrella”, a storytelling concert where past and current students where able to put their new skills to the test in front of their fellow students, family, and friends of all ages.</p> <p>One student who got to perform a story was Mariesa Rojas. Rojas told a story entitled “Angelita and the Giants,” which is like Snow White but is a Brazilian tale. One fun fact about her tale is that instead of a poisoned apple, there are poisoned slippers that cause the princess to fall into a deep sleep.</p> <p>To most people, performing in front of their peers is nerve racking, but Rojas says it wasn’t all that bad, “My mouth was dry and my hands were sweaty, but once I started it was easy.” Rojas also said she enjoyed the event and thought it went smoothly, “I was impressed. I would do it again.”</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/emcc-campus" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">EMCC Campus</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-engagement" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Engagement</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/cultural-celebration" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Cultural Celebration</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/art" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Art</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/educating-community" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Educating the Community</a></div></div></div> Fri, 07 Nov 2014 00:12:11 +0000 SELCB60601 208 at Dr. Linell Cady Visits Glendale Community College /beyond-campus/volume-3-issue-1/dr-linell-cady-visits-glendale-community-college <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Miguel Guzman</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/beyond-campus" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Beyond Campus</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/beyond-campus/207-l.cady.jpg?itok=bTCVhOyt"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/beyond-campus/207-l.cady.jpg?itok=bTCVhOyt" width="339" height="480" alt="L. Cady" title="Honors Forum Speaker Linell Cady" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>For the school year of 2013/14, the Honors Forum Lecture Series sponsored by the Maricopa Community College District was focused on the culture of competition. For the third installment of the series, Dr. Linell Cady stopped by Glendale Community College (GCC) in the spring to talk about religion and competition.</p> <p>Cady is the founding director of the Center for the Study of Religion and Conflict and is a dean’s distinguished professor of Religious Studies at Arizona State University. She is also the author of “Religion, Theology, and American Public Life,” in addition to many essays regarding issues of feminist theology and the interrelation of religion and secularism.</p> <p>Cady’s opening thoughts were on the recent paradigm shift in how we view religion. She said that there is now a resurgence and politicization of religion. Politicians use religion as a scapegoat or to justify their cause, she went on to say.</p> <p>Cady also said that separationists believe that the church must be apart form the state to keep religious freedom for the people; but, she made the point that the church suffers from being apart of the state.</p> <p>She followed by saying that there had once been religious nationalism in the U.S. where serving the nation was said to be serving God; also that there are still many religious phrases in national symbols or practices. For example, God is mentioned in our national anthem and currency.</p> <p>Her closing thoughts were on how we can move forward by being literate in religion, balancing competition, and cooperation, cultivating a relational vision for an interdependent world, and move past religious exclusivism and dogma.</p> <p>Following the lecture was a ten-minute question session where people asked her about specific points she made that they didn’t quite understand; the questions asked showed that people were genuinely interested in what she was saying.</p> <p>When asked what he thought about the lecture, first-year EMCC student Erick Plascencia said, “It was captivating. I learned that more of the youth is straying away from religion.”</p> <p>For information on this year’s Honors Forum Lecture Series, please visit:<br /><a href="http://www.estrellamountain.edu/academics/honors/forum" rel="nofollow">http://www.estrellamountain.edu/academics/honors/forum</a></p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/honors" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Honors</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/competition" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Competition</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/district-event" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">District Event</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/educating-community" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Educating the Community</a></div></div></div> Fri, 07 Nov 2014 00:08:03 +0000 SELCB60601 207 at A Beautiful Campus /focus-learning/volume-3-issue-1/beautiful-campus <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Ernesto Oliva</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/focus-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Focus on Learning</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/focus-learning/198-landscaping.jpg?itok=JhnVqwsY"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/focus-learning/198-landscaping.jpg?itok=JhnVqwsY" width="480" height="360" alt="EMCC campus" title="Beautiful landscaping impacts students&#039; learning in positive ways." /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>Have you ever thought about how beautiful, positive, and sanitary Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC) is?</p> <p>If you have, then have you ever wondered who and how much work it takes to maintain a college so clean? But if you have not put much thought to this notion then please, let us take a moment to shine some light on the people who make it all happen.</p> <p>The custodians, grounds team, and maintenance team are responsible for why EMCC is such a clean environment. There is a lot of work that they do at EMCC that affects how students learn.</p> <p>Providing a clean and beautiful environment indirectly motivates students to want to attend EMCC and earn an education. Students like Karina Orabuena feel proud to attend a school like EMCC because of how well maintained the campus is.</p> <p>Seeing colorful flowers helps Orabuena because it puts her in a content mood. “One of the reasons why I enjoy attending EMCC is because of all the gorgeous flowers around the school. It brightens up my day a little and makes me happier to go to class,” said Orabuena.</p> <p>There are three teams that divide up the work. The custodians are primarily in charge of cleaning the inside of EMCC.</p> <p>The grounds team does all of the yard work on campus early in the morning. No one ever sees the grounds team because they do most their work from 5 a.m. until 7 a.m..</p> <p>Then there is the maintenance team who is in charge of fixing things like broken doors. Also, they are responsible for setting up for events that occur on campus.</p> <p>“It is really amazing how much work the teams put in. They never fail to amaze me,” said Courtney Bourgeous, the office coordinator for Facilities Management at EMCC.</p> <p>Kim Jordan, the maintenance supervisor for Facilities Management, speaks passionately about his job, co-workers, and EMCC. “I believe that a clean environment sets the tone for the campus,” said Jordan.</p> <p>The National School Boards Association found that a “positive school climate was the critical variable differentiating between schools with high and low rates of delinquency, behavioral disturbance, attendance, and academic attainment.”</p> <p>The appearance and atmosphere of a school is impactful. This fall the college won the Crescordia Award. It is a prize awarded by Arizona Forward, an organization that “brings business and civic leaders together to improve the environmental sustainability and economic vitality of the place we call home.”</p> <p>According to EMCC’s website, “The success of the landscape reveals that even with an extremely modest budget, if coupled with a critical understanding of microclimate, plants, materials and detail can create meaningful and engaging learning settings.”</p> <p>The grounds team, maintenance, and custodians help make all this happen without students ever realizing it. It is because of them that EMCC looks the way it does every single day.</p> <p>So if you walk around campus and happen to see a custodian or maintenance worker, then do not hesitate to give them a thank you.</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/emcc-campus" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">EMCC Campus</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/employees" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Employees</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/educating-community" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Educating the Community</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-achievement" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Achievement</a></div></div></div> Tue, 04 Nov 2014 22:37:20 +0000 MARDH70971 198 at Economic Impact of Spring Training on Arizona /beyond-campus/volume-3-issue-1/economic-impact-spring-training-arizona <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Joshua De La Rosa</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/beyond-campus" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Beyond Campus</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/beyond-campus/197-baseball.jpg?itok=gsZ7oqYt"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/beyond-campus/197-baseball.jpg?itok=gsZ7oqYt" width="480" height="320" alt="Spring Training" title="Spring Training in Arizona" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>Spring training baseball in Arizona is a tourist attraction in the early spring months. The players and coaching staff have benefited from the beautiful weather to prepare for the long season ahead. However, that is not the only benefit that comes from spring training. The Arizona economy is the ultimate beneficiary of spring training in the desert.</p> <p>Many tourists visit Arizona in search of 70-degree weather and the possibility of outdoor activity. Some of these tourists are lingering snowbirds bypassing the severe winter weather at home. However, a large number of these visitors come solely to see their beloved teams play in the Cactus League.</p> <p>According to Peter Corbett, reporter for The Arizona Republic, a study conducted by the Cactus League Baseball Association showed that “67 percent of the visitors said that spring training was a primary reason for their visit to Arizona.” Baseball brought 1.7 million fans to Arizona this past spring. </p> <p>Spring training visitors are spending large amounts of money on these different industries during their stay in the valley. The continual increase in economic growth is no surprise to some. According to Glenn Hamer, President and CEO of the Arizona Chamber of Commerce, “Spring training in Arizona was created as a business push by local civic leaders.”</p> <p>These leaders saw baseball as an opportunity to draw business owners and tourists to the desert.</p> <p>These spring training visitors buy a lot of tickets, memorabilia, food, and parking during these months. In addition, the surrounding restaurants, hotels, and shopping centers generate a lot more revenue than they normally do. Corbett added, “Spring training accounted for $422 million in economic impact in 2012, up 36 percent from the previous study.”</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/educating-community" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Educating the Community</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/economy" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Economy</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/spring-training" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Spring Training</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/arizona-tourism" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Arizona tourism</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/cactus-league-baseball" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Cactus League baseball</a></div></div></div> Tue, 04 Nov 2014 22:34:24 +0000 MARDH70971 197 at Honors Lecture on the New American Economy /beyond-campus/volume-3-issue-1/honors-lecture-new-american-economy <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Kayt Ludi</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/beyond-campus" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Beyond Campus</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/beyond-campus/195-kimberlylanning.jpg?itok=UBl7feRZ"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/beyond-campus/195-kimberlylanning.jpg?itok=UBl7feRZ" width="351" height="480" alt="K. Laning" title="Honors Forum Speaker Kimber Lanning" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>The theme for the Honors Forum Lecture Series for the 2013-14 academic year was “The Culture of Competition.” During the last lecture of the series, Kimber Lanning spoke about “Finding a Place in the New American Economy”. The lecture was hosted by Mesa Community College (MCC).</p> <p> According to Dr. Shari L. Olson, President of South Mountain Community College (SMCC), who introduced the speaker, Lanning is “an entrepreneur, arts advocate and community activist who works to cultivate strong, vibrant communities.”<br /> Lanning founded an organization in 2003 called “Local First Arizona”, a non-profit devoted to educating people about the economic and cultural benefits of locally owned businesses.</p> <p> Lanning grew up in Glendale in what she describes as an “artsy family.” She originally dropped out of college to open a record store, though she later went back to school. She followed this by opening Modified Arts in downtown Phoenix a gallery in what was then, according to her, a very rough neighborhood.</p> <p> She and a fellow gallery owner began the First Friday events that are now a large part of cultural life here in Phoenix, and turned the run-down neighborhood into an arts Mecca. She gives credit for this achievement to the “power of what small businesses can do when they work together.”</p> <p> The goal of Local First Arizona, and the main point of Lanning’s lecture, was to encourage people to spend their money locally whenever possible. As Lanning put it, “We’re voting with our dollars every day.”</p> <p> Local First Arizona runs several different programs, one of them being “Shift Arizona” – the goal of which is to have Arizonans shift just 10 percent of their spending to local businesses. According to Lanning, for every $100 spent in a local business $45 stays in the community. While the same $100 spent at big box stores only results in $13 for the local economy. And for every two jobs created by a big store coming into town, three local jobs are lost.</p> <p> Lanning explained that local governments provide major incentives to big businesses to open locations in their cities; believing that jobs will be created.</p> <p> According to Lanning, Cabela’s is the number one business in the nation for receiving subsidies from local governments, averaging $25 million per store. However, when its location in Glendale opened it actually received a total of $68 million in subsidies, including free land. Big businesses are even given something called “tax abatement” where they are allowed to pocket the sales tax they charge customers instead of it going to the community.</p> <p> But Lanning pointed out the discrepancy between what makes a good job versus a poor one, and warned that we are “going to end up with clerks and shareholders and not much in between” if our economy continues down the path we are currently on.</p> <p> She noted that Walmart is the largest employer in Arizona, and that most people shop there because they think the chain has the cheapest prices. But 83 percent of Walmart employees nationwide utilize their state’s Medicaid programs. Lanning said that if we factor in the cost of subsidizing healthcare for their employees (and health care is the number one expense for big businesses) through tax dollars, Walmart suddenly is not so cheap anymore.</p> <p> How hard is it to shop locally? Lanning said she is not asking people to only buy all their clothes from a tiny boutique downtown that is only open for two hours on Tuesday afternoons. But things like getting a local oil change, seeing a movie at Harkins, or shopping at Basha’s all count as small changes we can make to support locally owned businesses.</p> <p> And even when you do have to dash into Walmart, try buying your milk from Shamrock Farms instead of a non-Arizona based dairy. Little things add up and can make a big difference.</p> <p>For more information on Local First Arizona, please visit: <a href="http://www.localfirstaz.com" rel="nofollow">http://www.localfirstaz.com</a></p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/sustainability" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Sustainability</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/educating-community" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Educating the Community</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-clubs-0" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Clubs</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/honors" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Honors</a></div></div></div> Tue, 04 Nov 2014 22:26:14 +0000 MARDH70971 195 at Black History Month Art Display /campus-life/volume-3-issue-1/black-history-month-art-display <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Kayt Ludi</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/campus-life" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Campus Life</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/campus-life/190-blackhistorymonth.jpg?itok=khJhoyU2"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/campus-life/190-blackhistorymonth.jpg?itok=khJhoyU2" width="480" height="320" alt="Black History Month" title="EMCC Black History Month Celebration" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>To celebrate Black History Month, Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC) presented an art exhibit entitled “Civil Rights in America” at the beginning of the year.  The exhibit featured seven photos and nine photomontages by Stephen Marc.</p> <p> The images encompassed important events, figures, and landmarks in the context of Black history and the civil rights movement in the United States. Some of Marc’s pieces depicted President Obama on the campaign trail, the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial, activist Angela Davis, and a montage of different sites involved in the tragedy of Emmett Till.</p> <p> Another montage showed marchers here in Phoenix commemorating the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington and Martin Luther King Jr.’s birthday, with the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D. C. as a backdrop. And hovering in the ‘sky’ of the montage was an image from an 1864 issue of Harper’s Weekly, entitled “Emancipated Slaves, White and Colored.”</p> <p> According to Austin Shepard, Director of Academic Enrichment at EMCC and who was instrumental in organizing the display, “Stephen Marc was a great choice for the Black History Month Art Display because of his strong interest in Black History and student success.”</p> <p> Stephen Marc is a professor of art in the Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts at Arizona State University. Marc describes himself as “a photographer/digital montage artist engaged in weaving together, and bringing to life, the places and remnants of the African Diaspora, with an emphasis on United States history.” Marc describes his work as “an interpretative relocation of, and commentary on the limited representations and accounts of the black experience, into the early years of the 20th century, that were usually defined from outside the community.”</p> <p> To learn more about the artist and see samples of his work, please visit: <a href="http://ihr.asu.edu/origins-art/marc" rel="nofollow">http://ihr.asu.edu/origins-art/marc</a></p> <p> </p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/campus-event" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Campus Event</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/emcc-campus" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">EMCC Campus</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/cultural-celebration" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Cultural Celebration</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/educating-community" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Educating the Community</a></div></div></div> Tue, 04 Nov 2014 22:06:47 +0000 MARDH70971 190 at One Billion Rising at EMCC /campus-life/volume-3-issue-1/one-billion-rising-emcc <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Ernesto Oliva</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/campus-life" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Campus Life</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/campus-life/189-onebillionrisingcopy.jpg?itok=8R9ltfUi"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/campus-life/189-onebillionrisingcopy.jpg?itok=8R9ltfUi" width="480" height="320" alt="One Billion Rising" title="EMCC Students Dancing at the One Billion Rising Event" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>On February 2014, Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC) participated in the global “One Billion Rising” dance campaign to raise awareness and to end violence against women and young girls. </p> <p>The “One Billion Rising” campaign created a choreographed dance to “break the chain.” The purpose of the dance is for women to figuratively “break off the chain” their abuser has on them.</p> <p>Worldwide, violence against women happens often. One of the event coordinators, Dr. Sandy Zetlan stated, “One out of three women in the world are beaten or raped one time in their life.”</p> <p>The dance is all about a woman owning her space and not being scared to dance in public. Sociology professor, Dr. Olga Tsoudis led the dance for faculty and students as she demonstrated each new move that had its own meaning.</p> <p>During the event, various women took the stage and shared their story on how they survived the consistent abuse suffered earlier in their lives. Student Andrew Tran stated, “Being surrounded by all of these women who have survived being mistreated by men is inspiring. It’s also great that Estrella Mountain Community College is shining some light on this subject.”</p> <p>The outside courtyard of Estrella Hall was decorated with inspirational T-shirts that promoted encouragement with such phrases like “battered but not broken” and “break the silence.”</p> <p>Student Jemimah Garcia said, “I’m glad that I attend a college where these types of issues about women are important. It makes me feel like I am making a difference for others.”</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-engagement" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Engagement</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/educating-community" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Educating the Community</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/campus-event" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Campus Event</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/activism" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Activism</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/active-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Active Learning</a></div></div></div> Tue, 04 Nov 2014 22:04:01 +0000 MARDH70971 189 at A Home That Gives Animals Hope /beyond-campus/volume-2-issue-2/home-gives-animals-hope <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Eva Ziegler</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/beyond-campus" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Beyond Campus</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/beyond-campus/176-animalshelterzieglerrw.jpg?itok=lswvfwB-"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/beyond-campus/176-animalshelterzieglerrw.jpg?itok=lswvfwB-" width="480" height="320" alt="No-Kill Shelters" title="No-Kill Shelters" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>What happens when one drops an animal off at a pound? Picture this: a tearful child waving goodbye to his pet at the pound, distraught that he could not take care of it. As the animal walks down the corridor to meet its fate, whimpering cries bounce off the wall and a smell of dirt mixed with toxic moisture lingers in the air. It is at this moment, walking through this dank hall, that the animal knows. The animal panics, ears become flat, and its posture slackens. As it gazes upon that dark door into the unknown, it realizes that these halls might be the last thing that it will see in its short life. Animals, like people, can sense when death is near.</p> <p>The Humane Society has to put down three to four million animals each year due to overpopulation in the shelters.  Animals have to be euthanized, not because they are vicious or dangerous, but because a previous owner failed to take care of them properly.</p> <p>There are a number of no-kill animal shelters scattered across the United States. Not only do these shelters spay and neuter animals to solve the problem of euthanasia, but they also give animals a second chance. No-kill shelters care for animals that have been neglected or abused and send them to new homes. However, no-kill shelters cannot always take animals in because they do not have enough workers to care for the amount of animals that enter the shelter. This is where volunteering comes in. Volunteers are the reason every animal has new hope for a future loving home.</p> <p>How can volunteering change the life of volunteers and the animals' life as well?</p> <p>Vanessa Lhanes, the front desk attendant at Sun Valley Animal Shelter, explained, “You get to be around animals all day. It is fun and you learn with the animals. Sometimes if you’re having a bad day you can just go in the kitten room and lay down. Who wouldn’t feel better when they are surrounded by kittens?” In fact, upon interviewing people in the shelter, it seemed as if everyone had this same view. Half the workers, who started as volunteers, do not even clock in when they go in to work. “It is not about the money,” Lhanes says, “It is about the animals.”</p> <p>Kurt Oleson, the current manager of Sun Valley Animal Shelter, started volunteering in 2008 and has been active in the shelter ever since. “You have to ask yourself, are you doing it for yourself or the animals? Either way, everyone gets something out of it. It is better than staying at home. It makes you feel good about yourself and you are making a difference in the animal’s lives at the same time," Oleson said. In fact, the shelter adopts about 700 animals per month.</p> <p>Despite the massive number, the employees are actually very picky about what homes they send the animals to. That is also where the volunteers come in. They characterize the animals based on their personality and make it easier to find the best home for them. Plastered over the walls of the shelter are the colorful labels of perky dogs. One of a little black Chihuahua reads, “Jeff; Outgoing and playful: I was transferred from another shelter due to overcrowding. You may notice that I bark and act like a stud muffin, but that’s because I don’t know you. Once I know I can trust you, I’m a big love bug.”</p> <p>Looking around at these signs that detail each dog’s unique personality, anyone can realize how much work goes into the shelter. No animal is left behind because the volunteers get to know them and give them the attention that they need.  Every time Oleson spoke, dogs all around the shelter were being walked, their gums pulled back with huge grins and floppy, pink tongues askew. As one of the dogs playfully nudged Oleson’s leg, he explained, “I couldn’t work in a shelter that euthanizes. If I see Fluffy or Tiger one day, I would not be able to handle not seeing them the next day.” He added, “It is a big family. Sometimes you don’t want to say bye to the animals, but you do it knowing you sent them to a good home.”</p> <p>The Sun Valley Animal Shelter is just one of the no-kill shelters across America. According to the American Humane Association, “fifty-six percent of dogs and seventy-one percent of cats … are euthanized,” in a typical shelter. Oleson emphasized: “We are here to give the animals a forever home. We leave here every day knowing that we did that.”</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/activism" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Activism</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/volunteering" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Volunteering</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/educating-community" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Educating the Community</a></div></div></div> Mon, 03 Mar 2014 20:39:51 +0000 ERIXL33951 176 at EMCC Students Walk to Fight AIDS /focus-learning/volume-2-issue-2/emcc-students-walk-fight-aids <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Kristofer Lervold and Kayt Ludi</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/focus-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Focus on Learning</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/focus-learning/172-aidswalk3.jpg?itok=UDnHDAXj"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/focus-learning/172-aidswalk3.jpg?itok=UDnHDAXj" width="480" height="246" alt="SOC 130 class at the AIDS Walk in Phoenix." title="SOC 130 class at the AIDS Walk in Phoenix." /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>“Thank you all for joining us on our momentous occasion! We are so happy that so many people made it today! And now, on your mark, get set, go!”</p> <p>That’s how the AIDS walk started; several thousand people walking in unison for a common cause. Some people were alone, listening to music and jogging to the beat. Others walked with families, most likely planning to visit the surrounding restaurants and hot spots later. Some people also walked in groups, surrounded by their peers from social circles or the workplace. </p> <p>There were even a select few people who dressed up in drag.</p> <p>Throughout the walk, you could see people smiling, talking, and enjoying each other’s company.</p> <p>Then there was Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC).</p> <p>One morning, Professor Olga Tsoudis explained to her class SOC130 class that it would be participating in the AIDS walk. The students would also be organizing and recruiting others. To accomplish their task, they set up booths around campus, asking for donations to fund AIDS research, and also to hand out male and female condoms.</p> <p>More than one curious passerby looked at the array of prevention devices, which ranged from dental dams (to protect during oral sex) to female condoms. Many students who saw these items had no idea what they were, and most seemed embarrassed to ask.</p> <p>As for information on the AIDS walk, many people asked when it was starting, how much it costs, but most asked in disbelief, “You mean I could bring my dog to walk too?”</p> <p>“Yes!” they replied. Each dog could raise its own amount of money, and that too would go towards raising money for the AIDS walk. After switching the donation jar picture to show various dogs that were going to walk, donations seemed to increase to support the caring canines.</p> <p>CJ Minott, Director of Events at Aunt Rita’s Foundation (the organizers of AIDS Walk Phoenix), estimated that 6,000 people participated this year.  “It was our largest turnout ever.” Minott said.  All those people joined together to help stop the spread of a disease that has caused much harm in many lives.</p> <p>A woman with a microphone was pumping up the crowd, as back up dancers kept the beat of the music. During the walk, various points would have spots for local bands, who sold their CDs on the side to support their goals as well.</p> <p>EMCC student Annmarie Mathis said, “It was interesting to see so many diverse groups of people coming together for a common goal, a common purpose.”</p> <p>Nicole Archuletta, a fellow EMCC student, commented, “I really enjoyed walking in the AIDS walk. It was amazing to see so many people supporting a great cause.”</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/activism" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Activism</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/educating-community" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Educating the Community</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/student-engagement" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Student Engagement</a></div></div></div> Mon, 03 Mar 2014 20:29:03 +0000 ERIXL33951 172 at EMCC is Celebrating and Educating About Black History Month /campus-life/volume-2-issue-1/emcc-celebrating-and-educating-about-black-history-month <div class="field field-name-field-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">By Jessica Stewart</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-topic field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Topic:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/campus-life" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Campus Life</a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="og:image rdfs:seeAlso" resource="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/campus-life/139-blackhistorymonth.jpg?itok=J8hidlyQ"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/articles/campus-life/139-blackhistorymonth.jpg?itok=J8hidlyQ" width="480" height="331" alt="Black History Month Celebrations on Campus" title="Black History Month Celebrations on Campus" /></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-body field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> </p> <p>In February, students and faculty of Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC) showed their appreciation for American history by celebrating Black History Month.</p> <p>All month long the college was hosting events to celebrate and educate the community on the achievements and contributions African Americans have made to American culture. Events featured cultural exploration, commemoration of prominent leaders, and various educational workshops and lectures.</p> <p>Among the proceedings was the second annual Black History Conference, a program focused on educating college and high school students in depth about the different aspects of black history. Director of Student Life and Leadership/Athletics, Herschel Jackson has been involved in coordinating this event since its debut last year, and was ecstatic about the turnout of over 400 students, 35 of which were still in high school.</p> <p>For Jackson, the purpose lay heavily in educating about the deep impact African Americans have had on American history. He stated, “History books teach us about Martin Luther King and Rosa Parks, but there is a rich history neglected. It’s a shame it’s not taught to children from very early on.”</p> <p>An article about Black History Month entitled “The Debate Rages On” expresses the notion that with all the accomplishments in racial equality, some feel Black History Month is unnecessary or even racist. Jackson disagreed, expressing a need for change in educational representation, “Ideally, history books would have a comprehensive outline of all immigrant development. American history is a melting pot, but currently history books only focus on the dominant elements, while glossing over minority contributions.”     </p> <p>Honors Program Director and English Professor, Alexander Andrews, echoed a desire for better education about black history. “My biggest grievance is that history books, particularly K-12, teach slavery as a side note, when actually it was a major event in our country. The economic benefits of slavery propelled us to becoming the richest and most powerful nation.” This fact is confirmed in an article entitled “Agriculture in History”, which states that agricultural slavery was highly profitable for the U.S. In 1860, cotton exports alone accounted for nearly 60 percent of the nation’s total exports.</p> <p>EMCC student Christopher Poole felt that black history is essentially American history, and should be celebrated year round. When discussing the struggles of African Americans today he said, “There are still barriers before us. Stereotypes are still prevalent, and racism still exists, just slightly subdued.” Poole cited poor portrayal of African Americans and other minority cultures in the media as a factor and said we needed to follow Dr. King’s dream and unite.</p> <p>From students to administration, the message was clear: Black History Month is not only a time to celebrate and honor African Americans, African American culture and contributions to our society, but also to focus on what we can do to better our future in becoming the best and most culturally inclusive nation in the world.</p> <p> </p> <p> </p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/educating-community" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Educating the Community</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/ethnicity" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Ethnicity</a></div><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/campus-event" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Campus Event</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/tags/cultural-celebration" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Cultural Celebration</a></div></div></div> Thu, 26 Sep 2013 03:48:35 +0000 SELCB60601 139 at